Do employers want BSNs or does it matter?

  1. Just curious...since you guys are out of school now and into the "real" nursing world...

    In general, do employers seem to be more impressed with a BSN? Or does it matter? I'm sure that with the shortage it isn't an issue affecting whether or not you'll be hired...but are you finding that it makes any difference in starting salary, getting your first choice of area/department, etc.?

    Thanks,
    Karen
    •  
  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   fergus51
    Depends on where you go! Some places prefer it, others prefer and ADN, others a diploma. It does matter where I am and it can be used as a consideration factored into who gets a job, but I seriously doubt anyone will find themselves unemployed with an ADN.
  4. by   mark_LD_RN
    OUR HOSPITAL IT DOES NOT MATTER TO WORK THE FLOOR, SUPERVISORS, AND CHARGE NURSES NEED BSN AND MUST HAVE BSN IF NEW GRAD TO WORK ER,L&D,ICU OR OPERATING ROOM
  5. by   nightingale
    Like the posters say, it does not matter for floor nursing nad depends on where you want to go with nursing.

    The BSN does open more doors for you. Some facilities offer a minimal pay dif (I have seen a dollar dif) with a BSN. With board certfication of some specialties you must have the BSN although you can certify.

    I am proud to say I have my BSN.

    B.
  6. by   shay
    For general staff nurses, I think all most employers want right now is a valid license and a pulse. :chuckle
  7. by   KC CHICK
    Shay says it best.
    Most hospitals in my area hire ADN's for EVERY specialty. Members of my graduating class went to ICU, ER, L&D, OR, AND PEDS.
  8. by   BrandyBSN
    I dont really think it matters, and not having a BSN will definately NOT keep you out of getting a job I get 50 cents an hour more for having my BSN, which isnt much. Out of 25 new nurses that started hospital orientation with me in May, only 3 of us have bachelor's degrees. It doesnt keep you out of the job market at all at my hospital, charge nurses, supervisors, whathaveyou, it doesnt matter on degree, just on performance and seniority.

    higher positions such as administration, directors and that type of positions when vacant and posted say things like "BSN prefered", but that is not mandatory. they look at many other things when filling the postions, not just degrees

    brandybsn
  9. by   Mito
    I haven't even started my final year of a my diploma nursing program (your ASN) and the offers keep rolling in. Like Brandy said it doesn't really matter, there is plenty of work for everyone.

    Mito
  10. by   Michelle_nurse
    I work in a federal hospital, and to have positions like head nurse, community health nurse or hospital coordinator ("supervisor") you need a bachelor's. It also gives you higher ranking on desired shifts/replacements. Also if you have a bachelor's you get $1000 extra a year. (Canadian) and my hospital will pay for the tuition.

    I have my RN diploma from a 3 year college program. I graduated just over a year ago. I am an assistant head nurse, part time on night shift and I work on availability on evening shift. I have the highest position that I can have with my education at my hospital.
    In 6 days, I am starting my bachelor's degree, part time, while working.
  11. by   RNConnieF
    I came out of an ADN program and when I was interviewing no one asked me if I had a BSN, the only question was when I was going to sit boards! Where I work BSN is not even on the name badge as there is no pay increase for getting the BSN. Non BSN nurses serve in all areas of the hospital at most levels. Nurse Manager requires a BSN.
  12. by   Neon8
    Kaiser Permanente in California grab BSN's as soon as they walk in the door. The pay is $1/hr more also.
  13. by   futurecdrn
    It's true that both ADN and BSN grads will always have jobs especially with the demand. However, what happens if you want to try another field or industry that requires a Bachelor's degree. The fact is ADN is not a Bachelors degree that's necessary to propel your career and simply, BSN can provide more opportunities long-term.

    I've been working outside of nursing field and it helps having BSN that I can fall back on in case I want to make career changes. For example, pharmaceutical, medical, biotechnology fields require Bachelors and prefers allied graduates such as BSN, PharmD...

    I'm off to studying NCLEX Have a nice day!
    Last edit by futurecdrn on Sep 5, '02
  14. by   memesuzRNC
    [B]I am new to this forum and wanted to say to all of you out there to go straight from your ADN or diploma program to at least the BSN program. I would give anything if I had just started my BSN basics early on before I got so old. I got my ADN the year I turned 40 and have been a nurse for just over 12 years....you do the math. Needless to say the older I get the harder it is for me to start working on my BSN. I am gathering my letters now and want so badly to get my BSN before I die! I have had lots of health problems for the past few years so it is even harder for me to get motivated! I pray God will give me the strength to get through it and the mental capcity to pass do well as far as my grades. Most of the nurses here are ADN other than those in administration or education. That is what I would love to do! I would love to be involved with diabetic or other type of education. I work in the Regional Transfer Center of a 360 bed hosp. We are the Regional Trauma Center and I deal with the helicopter and the calls from the outlying areas. I am going to put in for a transfer to our ER next week on the clinic side. I doubt I can deal with the pace on the acute side. Anyway get after it and keep on your education ASAP! Dont put it off any longer that absolutely necessary. Even just one class a year....anything to be working toward that goal. God Bless you all!
    Last edit by memesuzRNC on Aug 3, '04

close