Discrimination, discrimination.. Tell me what you think. - page 2

by MaravillosaRN

I recently applied for an RN position out of state. After less than 8hrs of applying I got a call from the nurse recruiter asking for an interview. I was so excited. I spent whatever little money I had bought a ticket and went to... Read More


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    You could genuinely have been great during the interviewing process and still not have been the best candidate the position. That's something a lot of new grads are facing these days.

    I can't imagine what it must feel like deal with those kind of feelings after receiving a rejection email/letter. "Did I not get the job because I didn't interview well or because of the way I look?" Honestly, I think that would be frustrating and disheartening. However, as others have said there could be a number of reasons why you didn't get the job. The problem with focusing on whether or not racism was the reason is that it doesn't leave you with a way to be proactive for future interviews. You are who you are and that's not going to change the next time around. Some people are indeed racist, but it is nearly impossible to prove in these situations. What would be better is to continually focus on what you can improve so that you increase your odds of being hired. Some managers and recruiters will be racist, but not all of them! It would be so much better to be hired by the ones who are not as ignorant and closed minded
    NurseB_ and sunnyd_83 like this.
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    My heart sank that you spent what money you had and flew to interview and still didn't get the job. That just plain stinks.

    Honestly, there isn't anything in what you posted to indicate ANY reason why it happened. Could it be race? Of course it could. But it could also be a hundred other things. Sometimes people just don't "fit" in the corporate culture. Sometimes you do everything right and it all went great and you STILL don't get the job. And sometimes life gives you results that make you want to know why and you just don't get to know.

    It sounds like there is nothing for you to focus on here other than the grief of not getting the job; that pain is hard to sit with, so we start looking for the reasons why to try and ease the distress. It is much easier to be angry than to be sad a lot of times and finding out it was your skin color would undoubtedly make you angry. But..... You can't say it was race or personality or lack of qualifications and you probably never will have those answers. If you create a bias in your mind, you are creating a bias in yourself as well. A bitterness you do not need to carry with you given it is unproven in this particular instance. It is just as likely it was your distance from the job as it was your skin color.

    Undoubtedly there is something better in store for you coming down the line. Don't let the question become the answer. In the end, you can't change any of it, including your skin color - therefore the why doesn't matter at this point. It sounds like you interviewed well and had a good experience there. That will do nothing but help you at your future interviews. Hold your head high and keep your eyes open for the next opportunity. I wish you the best!
    pchs052010 likes this.
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    There was absolutely nothing in your post to indicate that it was because of your race. It could be they didn't like your personality or because they wanted to see if someone with more experience than you would eventually apply or they felt that they would be better off with someone who has a slightly different skill set, or one of a hundred other reasons.
    Geesh...icon_roll
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.
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    As a former nurse manager, I would like to explain a bit about the hiring process.

    When a position becomes open, most institutions require that it be posted in house for a period of time before it is posted to the public. If no candidate is hired in-house, then it opens up to outside candidates. That is where you came into the process.

    Usually, resumes and applications are reviewed by HR, weeded out, then forwarded to the nurse manager. The NM may not initially (or ever) see all of the applications or resumes received. HR chooses some potential candidates and the NM chooses some. Interviews are set and may take weeks to complete. It is possible that at this point, a "special" candidate entered the process, someone from in-house, someone personally known to the manager or a staff person, a recent grad with a work/scholarship agreement, maybe even the neice of the CEO.

    While ideally, the NM would have the final say over who is hired, that is not usually the case. The manager probably will select 2-3 candidates that s/he would like to hire, then HR will give their input and a final choice will be made.

    It is entirely possible that the NM's choice will be over-ruled for any number of reasons, including references, past work history of the candidates, salary constraints, hospital obligation to employees with scholarships, even nepotism.

    So the nurse manager may have wanted to extend you an offer that was over-ruled for any number of reasons by HR. I understand the tendency to question race as a factor, but highly doubt it. No reasonable or reputable HR department would allow that to be a consideration. If it were, you are better off not working there.

    Best of luck to you.
    CandyGyrl, fashionistaRN, GimiRN, and 9 others like this.
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    Please keep your head up. Discrimination happens, we know it. People can state it doesn't happen but we know that it does. I CANNOT say this is what happened to you in this situation. You have to keep going and apply for other jobs. Trust and believe that you will get a job. I applied all of the US. Telephone interviewed in KY, AZ, and FL. I just kept applying about 100 times if not more.

    Keep applying and praying for the job that you want.
    sunnyd_83 likes this.
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    Quote from MaravillosaRN
    I respect your opinion that maybe it has nothing to do with race. But I was simply expressing how I felt, I never said it was a fact. To say that I'm making it about race to make myself feel better, really? You must be kidding me. You think it makes me feel better to think that someone maybe couldn't look pass my race and take a closer look at my qualifications? I would rather feel like I didn't get the job because there were a lot of candidates, my interview wasn't as good as I thought etc.. For the record no one who ever felt discriminated against because of their race chose to feel that way to feel better.Again, I was expressing how I felt, I didn't choose to feel that way; I just did, and nor does it make me feel better.
    I apologize for making it sound that way but I was meaning you found comfort in thinking that the denial was based on race and that they had an excuse to not hire you. You now had a justification.

    With this day and age, I just dont see racism in hiring (especially in nursing). The nurses that work in my small hospital come from all over the world. We have African nurses (from Africa), Indian nurses (from India), Chinese, American, British, Australian, Mexican and Philippians. There is a vast cultural diversity in the health field and racism just doesnt have a place these days due to the lack of qualified applicants. While I cannot say it doesnt happen, look around at the people working there and tell me that racism was a factor when hiring the staff of a hospital. I live in good ole Texas where people still think we are racist.... it is just not a factor
    jelly221,RN likes this.
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    Quote from 8mpg
    With this day and age, I just dont see racism in hiring (especially in nursing).

    I live in good ole Texas where people still think we are racist.... it is just not a factor
    Okay. I live in Louisiana, and have spent much time in Texas. I am black, and I can tell you without a shadow of a doubt there are still plenty of racists in both of our states. I say this not because of assumptions, but because I have be told directly some very nasty racist things, and have been called quite a few racist names both in LA and TX, and I am just twenty something.

    I wish it weren't a factor, but sometimes it is.
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    Quote from DreamNurseRN
    Okay. I live in Louisiana, and have spent much time in Texas. I am black, and I can tell you without a shadow of a doubt there are still plenty of racists in both of our states. I say this not because of assumptions, but because I have be told directly some very nasty racist things, and have been called quite a few racist names both in LA and TX, and I am just twenty something.

    I wish it weren't a factor, but sometimes it is.
    You were told you didnt qualify for a job because of your race? Yes there are racist people, but did it effect your job? If it did, you have legal recourse.

    My comments were to the original poster who thought she might have been denied a job based solely on race and that it wasnt her interview, education, experience, etc that were the contributing factors. I never denied that there are racist people throughout the world, I commented that racial discrimination in a workplace setting such as a hospital is a very rare occurring. There is so much cultural diversity throughout hospitals and they employ people from all around the world.
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    Quote from 8mpg
    My comments were to the original poster who thought she might have been denied a job based solely on race and that it wasnt her interview, education, experience, etc that were the contributing factors. I never denied that there are racist people throughout the world, I commented that racial discrimination in a workplace setting such as a hospital is a very rare occurring. There is so much cultural diversity throughout hospitals and they employ people from all around the world.
    While this may be true in the hospital you work, I think that claiming that discrimination in the hospital setting is "rare" is a gross generalization. Unless you are hiring people all all around the world, how would you know?

    Fyi, I can't tell if the OP experienced discrimination or not, I just don't think that it's "rare". It definitely happens.
    Hoozdo and Strivin2BgreatNurse like this.
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    Funny thing happened on my way to my first nursing jobs.....

    The first was in school. In NE FL, the vast majority of my instructors were women of color (euphamism for black). All of the graduate nurses of color in our class had no difficulty finding jobs. I have been in the hospitals and see an amazing amount of women of color working as doctors, nurses and aids.

    I am in SC and I haven't seen it different here. So where racism is supposed to be the strongest, how is it I see so many women of color succeeding?

    I have, however, seen those fired or not hired claim that it was because of thier skin color. It makes a person go....hmmmmmm, really?

    Was it skin color or some other innocuous reason? Unfortunately, you most likely will never know. Move on an succeed regardless.
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.


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