Anyone else frustrated with being a new nurse? - page 3

I have been a nurse for 4 months. So far, I've been disappointed and frustrated with my job. I am not sure how much has to do with my hospital, floor, and shift, and how much has to do with me. In... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    Quote from veegeern
    On a really good day we have 5 or 6 patients each. On most days, we end up having 6-9 patients at a time because we are either between times to flex staffing (every 4 hours staffing is re-evaluated) or because there just isn't anyone to bring in to work.
    This is outrageous. Come to California. They can't give you more than five patients by law.

  2. by   fudgeprincess
    Hi i am about to become a new nurse - starting a diploma in notts england in march.
    I am so excited but have just been scaring myself with web pages saying its impossible tpo survive on the bursary.Did u recieve and NHS bursary and how easily attained is the hardship fund im scared now!:uhoh21:
  3. by   DidiRN
    One year, many years ago (1989 I believe), I had five jobs...didn't get fired at all, quit every one of them. Hated them all. It just took finding the right position and the right place. There was a shortage back then too, but not nearly as bad as it is now. I am one of those people that I just had to actually go in and try an area; by just hearing about it wasn't enough. That's how I ended up doing ICU and ER. I never thought I'd ever do either area of nursing, but I tried them both and loved them (I am currently doing ICU now).
    Are all your jobs in one facility or different ones? Either way, I think you just got to keep trying to find something that will make you happier, you can't go wrong doing that. Good luck to you


    Quote from NurseCyd
    I don't know that I would really be considered a "new nurse", but I definitely still feel like one. I've been nursing since June 2004, and since then have had three different jobs (well, four if you count my recent transfer against my will to another unit). I still haven't found what I'm looking for. I did med/surg, and like many of you, the 3 to 11 shift, which I hated because it was just overwhelming. I would get admissions back to back (once I got two new patients at the same time), sometimes would have twelve patients with an LPN (sometimes not IV-certified, which was stressful), didn't really have any help, and worked with a bunch of old burned-out nurses. Anyway, you get my point. I was stressed out. Then, I worked in the NICU for four months. Didn't like that either. THEN, tried labor/delivery, but that didn't work out (too high-stress and my orientation was lasting a little longer than it should have). Now, I'm on the postpartum unit, which I guess is okay. I started working nights last week and hate it already. I've been desperately searching for another job because I need to make more money and I truly think that I want to get out of the hospital environment.
    So, now that I'm done complaining, I just want to say that I relate to all of these posts. But now I need some help or advice from some of the more experienced nurses out there. My mom tells me that it will look bad on my employment record if I continue to go from job to job (I call myself a job hopper), but then my good friend (not a nurse) tells me yesterday to go for it, that I should keep trying until I find the area of nursing that I love. I tend to agree with my friend (simply because I don't want to feel bad about wanting to leave my current job). Thing is, I have no idea what I want to do. I've thought about travelling, but I keep thinking of excuses not to. I thought about agency nursing, but that would keep me in hospital work, and some of the places around here are less than desirable to work for (lots of horror stories). I've thought about home health, because I really like the independence of it, and especially the opportunity for lots of patient education. Then, I thought about hospice, but what if I couldn't handle it?
    It would just be nice to know that I'm not the only nurse who thinks this way. I'm not satisfied with my job right now, and I don't really want to feel bad about it. But I also don't want to jeopardize my career future. I'd like to get my NP, but you need money to do that, and I'm not making enough! And I haven't been in a place long enough to get tuition reimbursement.......ugh.
    Any advice, magic spells, prayers, whatever............would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, and I really enjoy reading all of these posts. Makes me feel like I'm part of a big community........
  4. by   DidiRN
    God Bless you new grads out there today...to be quite honest, I don't think if I was a new grad today, that I could make it on how things are today in hospitals compared to 20 years ago.
    Stepdown/telemetry to me is the hardest area to work in. I did surgical stepdown for many years, and it was just so crazy. But looking back, I gained a lot of very valuable experience that really helped me out in other areas that I tried out later on. Cardiac stepdown I really liked, but when they started to have the "revolving door" constantly of admissions and discharges, it just got too much for me personally.
    Take a look around at some of the more experienced people on your unit...if they are unhappy too, and morale is horrible,turnover is sky high, chances are maybe you should find something else. But you still are pretty new, and you have to take that into consideration too.
    Sometimes it just takes finding the right enviroment, a place that is very supportive to new people. Those places are out there, and I currently work at one.
    I feel really bad for all of you new nurses...HANG IN THERE, WE NEED YOU!!!


    Quote from nupsgrad
    Well, it's been five months now and it's still a nitemare!!!Telemetry, anyone? I have been working on a busy tele floor since I passed my boards in June. Well, it's been hard. My training lasted 8 weeks. My preceptor had to leave the country after three weeks. I was left to train with any nurse that was available, and often "picked up " by another preceptor, who (helloooo!!!) already had a neubee nurse to orient. Nevertheless, I got through it. My problem is not having enough time to get everything done. I know, I have to prioritize, but at the end, everything STILL has to be done, and with not enough staff, I leave home at least one hour past my shift, because I have no time for charting, or finishing up admission papers, or discharge papers...
    Take a BREAK, you say? Yea, usually it's around 1:00 pm (I work a rotating 7-3:30 and some 3:00-11:30) by which time I am totally dehydrated and dizzy....not to mention no BR trip, either...Not very healthy, hugh? But what can I do when most of the patients on the floor are age 80+, most of them are total care, they need to be washed, fed, and up in a chair for PT by 9:00, or going to a procedure, or Xray, or being discharged in 30 min? (We usually have one CNA on the floor, with 20-30 patients).Most of these patients have between 10-15 different meds PO, IV, SQ, IM, top, + dressings etc...Most have meds scheduled every 2 hours. Vitals are every 4 hours. Have to notify the doc if they're off, right? By the time I'm done with 10 o'clocks, it's time to start insulin and 12 o'clocks, then it's 2 o'clocks...Not to mention that docs change,add or d/c meds and treatments every day by noon...Not to mention not all meds are in the bin and I have to call/and fax pharm to get them to the floor....Not to mention call bells, either...And if there is any kind of emergency(chest pain, SOB, tubes being pulled out or not functioning, change of mental status...), everything gets put off. And FAMILIES who always think you are their private duty nurse....Don't forget to add up I/O's and tape report by 3:00 pm....I like nursing. I love it when my patients say that "I have what it takes" because I am very pleasant, symphatetic and I always treat my patients like they are a part of my family. When they get better and feel good, I feel good and it makes me happy. And I love the people I work with, they are a good bunch and we get along very well, thru all the miserable times...But I am wondering if I'm in the right kind of nursing? I get home every day exausted, with very little energy to tend to my family, myself or anybody/anything else...Is this how nursing is supposed to be?? Living just so I can do my job? Please someone say NO, because I don't think I could be doing this for the next 20 years....Maybe I need a different shift, or apply to a different floor, or OR? Or work at a doctor's office?? Any suggestions?? (Sorry for pouring my guts out, but where else but here...) Thanks allnurses!
  5. by   cydney7
    Hi to all,

    Thank you, Didi, for saying what you said. It was just what I needed to hear. And to answer your question, my first and second nursing job were at different facilities, then I moved to another hospital and am still there (just got transferred to mother/baby about two months ago). It's not really the facilities........the hospital I'm at now is great. The people are great, for the most part. Thing is, I still don't really get to spend a whole lot of time with my patients like I'd like to.......especially working nights now........and I'd like to make more money if possible.
    What do you love about ICU? I don't know if I could ever do ER (my friend does it and LOVES it), because I don't handle high-stress well.........and also have trouble making quick decisions (I like to think things through). That's why I couldn't make it on labor/delivery. But the people there were all mean anyway........so I guess it's for the best.
    I talked to a lady at a hospice today, she said they have a full-time RN position open, and I'm supposed to fax my resume to her tonight when I go in to work. I don't know what will happen with that, but there's no harm in trying.
    Again, thanks, and thanks to everyone else for their support. Merry Christmas!!
  6. by   pie123
    Quote from DidiRN
    God Bless you new grads out there today...to be quite honest, I don't think if I was a new grad today, that I could make it on how things are today in hospitals compared to 20 years ago.
    Stepdown/telemetry to me is the hardest area to work in. I did surgical stepdown for many years, and it was just so crazy. But looking back, I gained a lot of very valuable experience that really helped me out in other areas that I tried out later on. Cardiac stepdown I really liked, but when they started to have the "revolving door" constantly of admissions and discharges, it just got too much for me personally.
    Take a look around at some of the more experienced people on your unit...if they are unhappy too, and morale is horrible,turnover is sky high, chances are maybe you should find something else. But you still are pretty new, and you have to take that into consideration too.
    Sometimes it just takes finding the right enviroment, a place that is very supportive to new people. Those places are out there, and I currently work at one.
    I feel really bad for all of you new nurses...HANG IN THERE, WE NEED YOU!!!
    I am a new grad and I work on a telemetry unit, of sorts. I noticed you mentioned that you didn't think you could be a new grad presently because of how the hospitals are. I am in full agreement. Honestly, were it not for my husband pushing me, I probably would have quit already, 2 year contract and all. I don't care. Some days are so-so, but others are pure hell. I am still on orientation for about another month. Lately, I have been getting put totally on my own, sent to ICU overflow, or put on my own for several hours. I am planning to speak to my manager regarding my orientation. Specifically about when there's a staffing shortage I'm on my own, but when we are adequately staffed, then I'm with a preceptor. I do not feel that I should have to pick up the slack for staffing issues. Several nurses on my unit are fulfilling their 2 year contract and leaving. Some are going to areas that they deem to be "less stressful." While I think every area has its own particular stressors, I cannot imagine anything being like working on some of these units. As I have mentioned before, I'm not sure if my dislike thus far comes from still being new and trying to understand things/sometimes getting overwhelmed, or if it is truly a dislike for my unit. I have heard that it gets better with time. How much time is the (rhetorical) question. Thanks for reading/listening.
  7. by   greatshakes
    Hi Didi RN

    Thnk you for saying we need you. That is good, even thouigh I know you are in America and I in Queensland. I wrote in earlier saying I had resigned my job from a small hospital as I had a sick husband and could only work once a week. Management had gone through 10RNs in 10 mkonths and I was the 11th. I was not prepared to risk my licence and my sanity. I was, as a new grad, with out post grad experience, not equipped should an emergency arise. They were always finding fault, even once because i took the mIMs in, a handbook of medications to check on any drugs I wasn't sure of. Out of 25 meds (I only needed to user the book once). Their receptionist has also left, fault- finding , nit- picking management all the time given with a smile. I hope to get a post grad sometime and I know exactly where I want to go. It won't be the same as when I did my prac there but the staff are all pretty good and they too, thankfully remember when they were grads. Just being told, we're needed does it for me. Thanks
  8. by   Nurse_Nikki_RN
    Quote from asilmk
    I have been a nurse for 4 months. So far, I've been disappointed and frustrated with my job. I am not sure how much has to do with my hospital, floor, and shift, and how much has to do with me. In the last month 5 nurses and 2 CNAs have left. 2 more nurses and 2 CNAs turned in their notices tonight. We have a new chief nursing executive that has us on a bare bones staffing grid and people have been dropping like flies. I work 3-11 on a Med/Surg floor. I dread going into work, am stressed the wole time I'm there, and cannot wait until I am off for a few days. I never expected to practice in the "Ivory Tower" like they taught us in school, but I never expected it to be like THIS. I never do anything for my patients except, "Here take this pill" or "Here's your shot." Is anyone else as disappointed with nursing as I am?
    I am now six months in and had my first job at a community hospital. I started with Telemetry and I hated it. I was stunned by how fast everything moved. Then I switched to Med/Surg. I didn't like that either. I felt like I was just too slow. They claimed that I would have support on days and then no one would help. I never complained to anyone, yet somebody started the rumor that I complained to the DON that no one was helping. I now work at a nursing home where the meds are often not there, I have 30 patients with tons of meds and I feel frustrated that there is no working thermometer on my floor and one B/P cuff for a floor of 60 people with HTN meds. The scheduling women schedules me for 2 days at a time and forgets when she had me scheduled for (yes, I am full-time perm there) and had people thinking I was just now showing up for my shift when she gave me the day off. I hat the nursing home too. I want so badly to be good at what I do. I passed my nursing classes with flying colors, but my time management sucks and I am trying to be more organized. I feel hurt and ashamed at the end of the day. I feel soft for wanting to cry sometimes. I pray everyday that it will be better, that I will be better...more relaxed with what I do. I need some encouragement because I want to do well for my patients..I want to remember to do everything I should do.
  9. by   drtlmartin
    I am a "newbie" and the other people that I work with make sure to remind me of that often! I enjoy my job for the most part but would like to feel more appreciated. I have searched for another job in a different facility but it is a double-edged sword type of thing -- I am told that I lack experience due to the fact of being a new graduate and that nursing home care is where new nurses get their experience -- it sucks because LTC is not for me. HELP!!!!
  10. by   LPN2RNmommy
    my sentiments to alll you guys that feel disillusioned... although i have had lpn license for two.5 yrs.. i took a year off to care for pregnancy and then my son for six months......then i went back to nursing, but agency doing ltc.. i love the elderly.. but nursing homes seem like warehouses of some sort.. the workload is impossible and the charting and regulations are ridiculous!!!
    i wonder if i can find a decent area of nursing..... i have back problems so i don't want lifting/excessive bending.... i don't know where to turn.. but i do'nt want to leave nursing yet either....i am working on RN and hopefully i can find something decent with my miniscule work experience..
    all i can say is good luck guys..... new nurses have it rough...
    people may say we are in the wrong profession... but i think we are trying to be good nurses but management/politics won't allow it..we see that patients aren't getting what they deserve and it bothers us.... why? cuz we CARE!!
    i hope u guys find luck in nursing.. i am looking to find a decent job that i can feel proud of....i don't want all this schooling to go to waste....
  11. by   Miss Mab
    Just wanted to vent about my own experience....

    I have been in the ED for almost 3 months as a new grad(yes, I know some people don't think you should do that anyway but I figured I'd try it and see). Anyway, it is a nightmare. I have yet to be assigned an actual preceptor. Every day I go in and basically stand around until the charge nurse can pester someone to be willing to "take " me. I have the routine down well enough, but I am unable to help out with code situations or anything like that. I guess I thought I would be taught certain things. I am more than proactive about seeking out my own learning experiences but I am just floating around in a no man's land right now. I still have no computer access of my own, Pyxis or Accucheck #'s. My unit is also, frankly, kinda gross and extremely disorganized. Most of the staff seems pretty disgruntled and I don't think they're necessarily rude people, probably just overwhelmed by the situation.
    Anyway, I have begun sending out my resume again but don't know if that will look bad. Plus, I do feel bad because I really wanted this to work but it's just so NOT.

    Anyway, thanks for listening and always open to good advice.....
  12. by   DidiRN
    Oh that's terrible...having to wait for a preceptor like that. Plus all the other stuff too you mentioned. And it is just so unfair to you. A friend of mine with 20 plus years experience quit a job here recently because she had over 10 preceptors. I quit an OR job because I felt my orientation was lacking (actually quit two OR jobs for that reason).
    I don't have a problem with new grads in ER, but you really need a detailed orientation. I think if you should find another job, just make sure to ask questions in regards to how you will be precepted, do you have enough preceptors, etc. Sometimes if you do get assigned one, it may not be the right person, so don't feel bad about asking for another one.
    ALso, I think if you could find place, if there is one close by to you, that has special programs for new grads in speciality areas, that would be a great help to adjusting to the hard life of ER nursing (done that myself too). If not, you can still do it, just in your interviews ask some pretty detailed questions about your orientation.
    Good luck to you, and and I am so sorry that you have to go through this with your very first job. But don't let it get ya down too much, there's lots of jobs out there (at least in most places).

    Quote from Miss Mab
    Just wanted to vent about my own experience....

    I have been in the ED for almost 3 months as a new grad(yes, I know some people don't think you should do that anyway but I figured I'd try it and see). Anyway, it is a nightmare. I have yet to be assigned an actual preceptor. Every day I go in and basically stand around until the charge nurse can pester someone to be willing to "take " me. I have the routine down well enough, but I am unable to help out with code situations or anything like that. I guess I thought I would be taught certain things. I am more than proactive about seeking out my own learning experiences but I am just floating around in a no man's land right now. I still have no computer access of my own, Pyxis or Accucheck #'s. My unit is also, frankly, kinda gross and extremely disorganized. Most of the staff seems pretty disgruntled and I don't think they're necessarily rude people, probably just overwhelmed by the situation.
    Anyway, I have begun sending out my resume again but don't know if that will look bad. Plus, I do feel bad because I really wanted this to work but it's just so NOT.

    Anyway, thanks for listening and always open to good advice.....
  13. by   pie123
    Quote from Miss Mab
    Just wanted to vent about my own experience....

    I have been in the ED for almost 3 months as a new grad(yes, I know some people don't think you should do that anyway but I figured I'd try it and see). Anyway, it is a nightmare. I have yet to be assigned an actual preceptor. Every day I go in and basically stand around until the charge nurse can pester someone to be willing to "take " me. I have the routine down well enough, but I am unable to help out with code situations or anything like that. I guess I thought I would be taught certain things. I am more than proactive about seeking out my own learning experiences but I am just floating around in a no man's land right now. I still have no computer access of my own, Pyxis or Accucheck #'s. My unit is also, frankly, kinda gross and extremely disorganized. Most of the staff seems pretty disgruntled and I don't think they're necessarily rude people, probably just overwhelmed by the situation.
    Anyway, I have begun sending out my resume again but don't know if that will look bad. Plus, I do feel bad because I really wanted this to work but it's just so NOT.

    Anyway, thanks for listening and always open to good advice.....

    My very first nursing job was like that. It was on a Med. Surg. unit that was very disorganized. The preceptor that I was given was basically told that she was going to precept me. She turned out to be far, far less than ideal. So I went to my manager very early on (the second week) and told her that I felt I was getting very little from the experience. I told her that anything that I knew was because I had worked previously as a nurse apprentice on a Med. Surg. unit. At this time, my manager admitted that this person was probably not the strongest nurse on the unit. Ok, then why was she selected???? I requested another preceptor. Well, they kept me on my former preceptor's schedule, but I never got another preceptor. I would show up and the charge nurse would be like, "Let's see...today I will put you with the unit secretary." Then one day she scanned her entire schedule of nurses working that day and still couldn't find anyone to put me with. On that particular day, she said I could "float" to the other Med. Surg. unit and work with another nurse there and if there wasn't one, then that charge nurse would be willing to precept. That day I decided to give notice. My manager also seemed less than interested in the fact that I was being shuffled around. Then at the end, she tells me what a good nurse I'm going to be and offered to have me work on another unit, blah, blah. By this time, I had already made up my mind to leave. This is probably going to sound horrible, but I left that job at the start of my 3rd week. I had no trouble getting another job. During one interview, the manager just wanted to know why I left. I was very honest (tactful all the while). In the other interview, the manager didn't even ask about it. I was offered both jobs. I say keep looking.
    Last edit by pie123 on Jan 11, '06

close