A new grad mentor

  1. Hi all,
    I am not a new grad however, in my role as a Clinical Resource Nurse, I offer a New Grad Mentorship Program. I am always looking for issues to discuss or any ideas of what would be interesting for new grads. So I would like to hear from anyone of the new grads re: difficult issues and circumstances, what your first year has been like, relationships with staff. Do you have mentors and/or preceptors and if so, how was that??

    Karen
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   RN-NY
    Hi Karen, I'm sure you'll be hearing from quite a few nurses soon and I can assure you it's very much appreciated! In the meantime, I wanted to mention a book I'm reading by Donna Wilk Cardillo, RN "Your 1st Year As A Nurse". It has a lot of interesting tidbits, anecdotes, facts and advice that I have found useful and has both US and Canadian grads mentioned.
    Although I got licensed more than a year ago, I only have limited experience in ambulatory care. So, I too am finding this will be helpful in continuing with the profession.
    I hope this helps. Take care!
  4. by   live4today
    Originally posted by Karen Barratt
    Hi all,
    I am not a new grad however, in my role as a Clinical Resource Nurse, I offer a New Grad Mentorship Program. I am always looking for issues to discuss or any ideas of what would be interesting for new grads. So I would like to hear from anyone of the new grads re: difficult issues and circumstances, what your first year has been like, relationships with staff. Do you have mentors and/or preceptors and if so, how was that??

    Karen
    Hello Karen...good for you for having that program at your place of employment. New grads need to know that such programs exist for them once they are hired on someplace to begin their nursing careers.

    One suggestion that I - a seasoned nurse - would make for you to consider doing at your place of employment is to allow all new grads the opportunity to rotate throughout the various areas of the hospital where nurses work so they can see where they would like to plant their roots as nurses. Too often these new grads accept jobs out of enthusiasm or NEED for financial pay right away that they end up regretting their choices. Med students get to rotate through various areas of the hospital, and many find their nick while doing so. I think Nursing grads should be given the same opportunity, so they can hopefully discover their nick, too.
  5. by   Karen Barratt
    To RN-NY and Cheerfuldoer,
    thanks for your comments and info. on resources. I will consider carefully...karen
  6. by   Nurse K-Bear
    I bought the book your first year as a nurse as well. I thought I wrote it. It helped me to understand that I am not alone and my fears and frustrations are shared by many. The book put it all in to perspective for me.
    I just got off of orientation as a LPN. Since I am going into my last year in a BSN program I challenged the LPN test. I spent a lot of my orientation learning what a LPN does.
    I found it strange to do procedures and the such without anyone standing over me. Now that I have been finished with orientation for about a month now, I have a lot more confidance in myself. I am still working on time managment thought, that probably takes a while to achieve.
  7. by   MHN
    most new grads here undertake a new grad program they are required to rotate through the different specialties and are given to opportunity to pick one specialty themselves we have had several postgrad students in psychiatry some have even gone on to undertake a post graduate degree in mental health.however I wouldn't suggest starting with psychiatry as your first post grad degree as one who is qualified as an RN,Midwife,Geriactric,and admin all these skills and my life experience are of great benifit.

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