RN Career Change to Massage Therapy

  1. I am a RN with 15 years of experience. I am seriously investigating going back to school to become a massage therapist. One of the schools I have visited assured me that I could have a successful practice as an independent contractor. Is this realistic or a sales tactic to get me to enroll? I would love any advice, especially from a nurse MT.
    Thanks,
    LLLRN
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Nicky032605
    Quote from LLLRN
    I am a RN with 15 years of experience. I am seriously investigating going back to school to become a massage therapist. One of the schools I have visited assured me that I could have a successful practice as an independent contractor. Is this realistic or a sales tactic to get me to enroll? I would love any advice, especially from a nurse MT.
    Thanks,
    LLLRN
    Hello, I have almost completed a Massage Therapy course. If you would like some information, I might be able to help. Feel free to PM me.
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    I was looking into this also. I looked in my yellow pages and found an LPN, LMT. I called him to ask about this career. What he told me was that the market is saturated w/ massage therapists in our area. He says people make appts (he opened a day-spa) and don't show up. He says this happens all day. He will have appts to see 9 or 10 people and 2 will show. He was in the process of closing his shop and going back to the nursing home.
    He told me that LMTs who make appts out of their home then go to the client w/ a mobile table, and those that work in chiropractic offices do ok, as well.

    Resort/retirement areas have a better market for LMTs than colder climates, in most cases. Although I did not become an LMT, I did research it thoroghly and talk to several people before deciding against it.
  5. by   LLLRN
    Great information. Thanks.
  6. by   StokoRN
    I live in Florida.. I too thought it would be a nice change from staff nursing in PACU & ED. I had 20 years experience at that time. I went to school & became an LMT. I don't regret that move, but I should have researched it better.

    Jobs in medical & chiropractic offices or not that plentifull and I understand that the pay in those settings is low.
    Like any venture. opening a day spa or massage therapy office is expensive and establishing a client base is challenging.
    Home visit massage therapy seems to be the way to go, but you have to be a real go getter, highly motivated and not concerned with marketing yourself.
    That is actually the way I went, but not very agressive, and I developed a very small client base. Subsequently, I stayed at hospital staffing and "moon-lighted" in my massage practice.

    I moved to N C and then to Utah and let my lisence lapse. I am now studying so I can get it reinstated.

    I hope this helps. If you are planning on being, or are already in Florida, please be aware that minimum requirements to graduate from massage school are getting tougher.


    "Your flag decal won't get you into heaven anymore , their already overcrowded from your dirty little war. Jeasus don't like killin, no matter what's the reason for..." John Prine

    The miracle is not that I finished, but that I had the courage to start.
  7. by   LLLRN
    I live in California and I requirements for school/training/hours depends on the local government. The school I am probably going to go to has a component that discusses the business aspect of self-employment. I have never really had to seriously market myself before, so I think that is going to be a big challenge for me.
    LLLRN

    Quote from StokoRN
    I live in Florida.. I too thought it would be a nice change from staff nursing in PACU & ED. I had 20 years experience at that time. I went to school & became an LMT. I don't regret that move, but I should have researched it better.

    Jobs in medical & chiropractic offices or not that plentifull and I understand that the pay in those settings is low.
    Like any venture. opening a day spa or massage therapy office is expensive and establishing a client base is challenging.
    Home visit massage therapy seems to be the way to go, but you have to be a real go getter, highly motivated and not concerned with marketing yourself.
    That is actually the way I went, but not very agressive, and I developed a very small client base. Subsequently, I stayed at hospital staffing and "moon-lighted" in my massage practice.

    I moved to N C and then to Utah and let my lisence lapse. I am now studying so I can get it reinstated.

    I hope this helps. If you are planning on being, or are already in Florida, please be aware that minimum requirements to graduate from massage school are getting tougher.


    "Your flag decal won't get you into heaven anymore , their already overcrowded from your dirty little war. Jeasus don't like killin, no matter what's the reason for..." John Prine

    The miracle is not that I finished, but that I had the courage to start.
  8. by   Nemhain
    Quote from LLLRN
    I am a RN with 15 years of experience. I am seriously investigating going back to school to become a massage therapist. One of the schools I have visited assured me that I could have a successful practice as an independent contractor. Is this realistic or a sales tactic to get me to enroll? I would love any advice, especially from a nurse MT.
    Thanks,
    LLLRN
    Yes, you can have a successful practice as an independent contractor, but realize that the work most likely will not be as steady as nursing. I've been a LMT for about 10 years now and I don't regret going to school at all. I don't do massage full time, but it's good money on the side and I get to set my own hours.
  9. by   soonermagic01
    You do not have to be an RN to be a nurse massage therapist, you may also be an LPN. They do not discriminate.
    Quote from LLLRN
    I am a RN with 15 years of experience. I am seriously investigating going back to school to become a massage therapist. One of the schools I have visited assured me that I could have a successful practice as an independent contractor. Is this realistic or a sales tactic to get me to enroll? I would love any advice, especially from a nurse MT. Thanks,
    LLLRN
  10. by   andy_allspice
    MANY nurses naturally gravitate towards massage. You might be surprised to find out there's a National Association of Nurse Massage Therapists, and that nurses do massage in all sorts of settings: private practice, hospitals, hospice, nursing homes, doctors' offices, etc. Their stories would probably inspire you.
    Last edit by andy_allspice on Nov 15, '07

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