Footcare: equipment, etc.

  1. Hello everyone!

    I got my CFCN last year and I'd like to hear from others who are practicing or considering it.

    I started working as a footcare nurse last fall, and am currently doing homecare and one clinic at a senior center. I'm working contract for another nurse who started a footcare LLC and had more demand than she could handle on a part-time basis. I also work part-time in a podiatry office but do not do footcare there. That may or may not change; the doctor I work has mentioned the possibility of my doing footcare but this has not become a reality. In the meantime, I like the regular income I get from this job and the access to the doctor's accumulated knowledge.

    I would really like to someday have a location where clients come to me for care. I'm not sure this would make any financial sense, but I'll be figuring that out this year. In any case, footcare is the niche for me, and considering my age it may end up being just the perfect part-time retirement job. The service I provide is very much appreciated, and I get a lot of job satisfaction from this.

    I just thought I'd write about the equipment I've bought so far and if anyone has any questions or anything to add, that is welcome! I do have a question about autoclaves, so I'll start there.

    I don't like the amount of chemicals I'm using currently, and don't want to chuck these down the drain. I've been disposing of the used disinfectant in a 10 gallon bucket, and I'm hoping that once the weather gets warmer, I can just put it in the garage without a cover and let it evaporate. Whatever doesn't evaporate, I'll channel through hazardous waste disposal. So, I want to by a small autoclave. I'm considering a small clave by a company called Revolutionary Science in Minnesota. They have two small models, the RS-SC-102 and RS-SC-200. If anyone out there is using one of these, I'd love to hear about your experience.

    As for equipment I aready purchased:

    I'm not very good at detecting pulses, especially pedal pulse (!) and have a numb left hand index finger, so I bought a doppler, which has been invaluable.

    I also have a power file from Medicool, the Pro Power 20K, which is quite nice. I went to Medicool beause the podiatrist I work for has that brand in the office. Since I'm doing home care and clinics, I bought the portable one with a rechargeable battery, and it's been great. I initially bought and used a set of diamond bits, but for grinding thick mycotic nails, I think the miniature sandpaper drums (or tubes) work better. I wear an N95 mask for this. I will also be making some (hopefully attractive) back-tie gowns as I really dislike being covered with fungus nail dust. I tried to find some that were not crazy expensive and not disposable but haven't found any yet, so I may just make some.

    For disinfection, I've been using Barbicide which is easily obtainable at any beauty supply shop. I may switch to Benz-All (benzylkonium chloride). Benz-All is what my podiatrist employer uses and it's covenient as it comes in pre-measured concentrated doses that you just add to a gallon jug of water. But I'm not sure it's the best and I have to do research on this.

    Ok, I've got to get to work so I'll quit for now. I hope to hear from others!
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  2. 1 Comments

  3. by   NedRN
    I don't like the idea of letting hazardous waste evaporate. We certainly thought the ground, lakes, rivers, and oceans, and now the atmosphere were inexhaustible places to dump but that is not obviously not true. If the safety data sheet requires special handling, do it! It is the right thing to do.

    I think you are right that setting up a permanent practice setting doesn't make financial sense. Senior citizen center clinics, and nursing homes visits are more cost effective for your likely bell curve clients. Or podiatry offices if you can get docs on board.

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