Foot care training - page 12

I have been interested in starting a foot care service for some time now and after reading posts from LoisJean feel this is something I can do. I would like to start out by receiving some kind of... Read More

  1. by   lindarn
    Quote from Hisdaughter
    You're right, it makes sense. I have my liability through NSO. Quite a jump up to $300.
    I live in Spokane, and I pay $150. 00 for insurance coverage for my Legal Nurse Consulting business. I take the lower levels of coverager because the cost is determined by the number of hours that you work in thr business. It also covers errors and omisssions. I have had Seabury and Smith for a number of years. They were formerly Maginnas. I was considering changing to NSO and then they increases their rates. Does anyone know why they increased their rates?

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, WA
  2. by   NedRN
    Quote from lindarn
    I was considering changing to NSO and then they increases their rates. Does anyone know why they increased their rates?
    I asked them why. They told me that the underwriters had not increased the rate for seven years. They were not able to tell me why now. They did not know of increased risk. I'm guessing that the underwriter's actuaries changed some assumptions about the risk. One of the problems with their rates is one size fits all. I'm have to think that interventional procedures (such as foot care) carry higher risk for lawsuits than what I do. As a travel nurse, my role is no different than a hospital employee who is paying a third my rate for insurance. The risk is identical.
  3. by   sherese
    I live in NYC Iam a new nurse with 2 years of exp. I would love to become a foot care nurse but how can I get clients? How does a nurse with no experiece go about starting a Foot Care business. Can I do this full time? What kind of money can I make?

    Iam sorry I cant help you with your questions but any info you provide I will really appreciate

    thanks


    Sherese




    This is the first time I have posted any message on this forum. I found the forum by doing a search on the interenet on foot care courses and came up with allnurse.com. I am a foot care nurse in private practice in California and have owned my own business for 8 years. There is not much in the way of foot care courses in the US, but Canada has many training programs and might be worth checking out. There is an annual foot care nurse course on the first Monday in October in Winnepeg that I presented at a few months ago that was great. There are 240 foot nurses in the provence of Mannitoba. I do not think there are half that number in the entire United States! The Canadians are far more organized than we are. The WOCN ( Wound, Ostomy, Continence Nurse organization) is in the process of developing a certified foot care program for RN's. I would like to know if the LVN's in the USA have any certified programs because they should be doing this too. There is definetely a major role that LVN's have in foot care. My approach is team work and I am working with and training both LVN's and RN's for my business. I would love to hear from anyone on this subject.
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 14, '08
  4. by   ehresources
    Hi Sherese,

    The first thing you should do is take a nursing foot care course. A lot of the courses do include some information about starting your own practice. How you market your business will depend on how you want to do business. Are you going to do house calls? Are you going to set up an office? What are your goals for the business besides doing it full time? A business plan is a must, and will guide you to the research you must do before starting and will also help you see your progress. Nursing Foot Care is a good business to be in but to be successful, you do need to do your prep work. What is your competition like? What are your strengths and weaknesses? Having a business has its ups and downs. When I started my business, I kept my other jobs (this was in the time of lay-offs and no nursing jobs) and built up my clientele. Network, tell everyone you know that you've started your own business. If you're trying to reach out to seniors that are isolated, they can be hard to reach. I love having my own business and now have others working for me. We have expanded to other services as well. It is the most challenging and rewarding experience for me professionally. I hope this helps...
    J



    Quote from sherese
    I live in NYC Iam a new nurse with 2 years of exp. I would love to become a foot care nurse but how can I get clients? How does a nurse with no experiece go about starting a Foot Care business. Can I do this full time? What kind of money can I make?

    Iam sorry I cant help you with your questions but any info you provide I will really appreciate

    thanks


    Sherese
  5. by   mattsmom81
    I am always revitalized by reading the entrepeneur posts here at Allnurses and have read this thread with interest!

    I have a silly question about the basics of foot care...do you provide the care from the position of a shoe salesman ie on your knees with feet on a small stool? Or do you have more comfortable position such as on the bed or with feet up on the couch, etc.

    I am trying to think of a comfortable position ergonomically to provide this care..LOL!
  6. by   ehresources
    Doing foot care is never going to be easy on the neck and back! The ideal is to have a chair that lifts the client, tilts them back etc. I work with the clients in podiatry chairs, gerichairs, raised recliners or any other type of chair. I have a Rubbermaid toolbox/stool that I sit on. It's just the right height for me and my clients. I find it too hard on my legs to be on the floor. The client's foot is on the chair leg rest or on my lap. Occasionally, they're in bed & I sit on my stool at the end of the bed. It depends on the client & where I am. There is a leg rest that you can buy to help support the client's leg. You have to be careful that they are not straining their hips & knees. The first thing I do is get myself & my client in a comfortable position. Hope that helps. I'd love to hear more from others about how they operate.
    J

    Quote from mattsmom81
    I am always revitalized by reading the entrepeneur posts here at Allnurses and have read this thread with interest!

    I have a silly question about the basics of foot care...do you provide the care from the position of a shoe salesman ie on your knees with feet on a small stool? Or do you have more comfortable position such as on the bed or with feet up on the couch, etc.

    I am trying to think of a comfortable position ergonomically to provide this care..LOL!
  7. by   mattsmom81
    Thanks for answering...I DO have back and neck problems...which is why I was wondering!
  8. by   ehresources
    I have been doing foot care for over 10 years in many settings and a sore back does seem to go along with the work. What I find that works best for me is to remind myself constantly while providing care to watch my back. It's easy to get lazy & tired and then start to slouch. Bend at the hips and try to keep your back & neck as straight as possible. I also stretch every time I stand up between clients. I need that minute or two to move and realign everything. The other thing that has helped me is Pilates. The exercises are gentle, help you stretch and work on increasing the strength of your core muscles which help support your back. A good instructor can help you modify them if necessary. My favorite instructor always showed the moves at 3 different levels of difficulty so you could gear the class to how you were feeling. It's been a real back-saver for me!
    The hard part is that we are always trying to accommodate the environments we're working in like people's homes, nursing homes where the clients are in special chairs, beds and haver to work around equipment and footrests etc. etc. etc. It is a real health & safety issue. While we do our best to protect ourselves, sometimes the job has to be done any way you can do it and clients don't/can't always assist in making it comfortable for both of us. Another one of the challenges of this job, I guess.
    Good luck,
    J


    Quote from mattsmom81
    Thanks for answering...I DO have back and neck problems...which is why I was wondering!
  9. by   guest***
    When I do home visits I sit on the floor in a stadium seat, sort or Janpanese style, with the client sitting in a comfortable chair. Since using this method I very rarely have back discomfort. You can get these seats at sporting good stores. It was the best investment I ever made!
  10. by   pmsrn76
    I have, only today, found allnurses.com. I was sent by my employer to the foot care course in 1997, then taught by Teresa Kelichi and an associate, in Charleston, SC. It was an 18 hour course then and the knowledge I obtained that weekend has been invaluable to me. It has allowed me to provide, with confidence, a service no other non-specility nurse employed by the company I work for can provide. Does anyone know of a source for monofiliments or is anyone making their own?
  11. by   JoFloRN
    Hi! I'm new to allnurses.com and have read through (I think all) the posts on foot care training. I've been searching for training in Texas. So far, unsuccessful. Are there any foot care nurses in Texas? I've been an RN 18 years, and am also a registered massage therapist with a certification in geriatric massage. I'm wanting to start a practice to include foot/nail care in addition to massage. I would appreciate any input. Thanks!
  12. by   footsavvy
    There are foot care courses listed on the wocncb.org website. Look at the links that take you to foot nurse certification information. They have a resource list.
  13. by   JoFloRN
    Thanks. I have found that web site, and it does offer some good information. I was wondering if anyone knew of any training courses offered in Texas as well, and if there are nurses in Texas doing this kind of work. Anyone know if there is a market for this in Texas or is it pretty much taken over by podiatrists?
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 14, '08

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