What type of education is needed to be a nurse massage therapist.

  1. 0
    I was told by a friend that an RN can give a "relaxation" massage vs. a "therapeutic" massage without any further education. Is this true? We were taught is nursing school to give massages, especially after a bath or prior to hs.
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  3. 15 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    most states require a massage therapy license or certificate of some sort in order to be able to perform massage services in exchange for money. To obtain that license or cert, it MIGHT be possible that there are states who might say a nurse could do that - I don't personally know of any.

    Texas is pretty specific - I would suspect most other places are too. I dont know of any nursing programs that offer the following within their curriculum:

    Texas Department of State Health Services, Massage Therapy Licensing Program - Apply for a New License - Massage Therapist

    A post bath relaxtion back rub is not really considered a massage. You aren't hanging a shingle out and drawing in customers to pay you for massages.
  5. 0
    I was not thinking about massage for money , but as a service that is always included with with a Botox or Restylane treatment. Like "Free relaxation massage with every injectable treatment." It would be a neck and upper shoulder relaxarion massage prior to tx.
    What do you guys think?

    Quote from gauge14iv
    most states require a massage therapy license or certificate of some sort in order to be able to perform massage services in exchange for money. To obtain that license or cert, it MIGHT be possible that there are states who might say a nurse could do that - I don't personally know of any.

    Texas is pretty specific - I would suspect most other places are too. I dont know of any nursing programs that offer the following within their curriculum:

    Texas Department of State Health Services, Massage Therapy Licensing Program - Apply for a New License - Massage Therapist

    A post bath relaxtion back rub is not really considered a massage. You aren't hanging a shingle out and drawing in customers to pay you for massages.
  6. 0
    I would probably check with your state regs on that one - both with the folks who regulate massage therapists and nurses. Doing it may be fine. Advertising it may be where it gets sticky.
  7. 0
    It only requires a few weeks of education and training to become a certified massage therapist. To be on the safe side, I would go ahead and earn the certification. I did this 6 years ago.
  8. 0
    Only a few weeks? I didn't know that. I thought it was at least several months of training including so many hundred hours of hands on massage. I need to look that up again then.
  9. 0
    It was three months and 100 clinical hours of massage when I took the program 6 years ago. However, I fully realize that mandates might have changed a whole lot within the past 6 years.
  10. 0
    Was this a course specifically for RN's? Where could I find out about this?

    Quote from TheCommuter
    It was three months and 100 clinical hours of massage when I took the program 6 years ago. However, I fully realize that mandates might have changed a whole lot within the past 6 years.
  11. 0
    Quote from Tanya RN
    Was this a course specifically for RN's? Where could I find out about this?
    None of the people in my classes were nurses. Everybody in the massage therapy class was a layperson.
  12. 0
    Check: Welcome to the NANMT!
    ABMP

    Fibril_late


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