Concierge Nursing

  1. 0
    I need some advice. I was considering starting my own "concierge nursing service" if you will that caters mostly to pregnant women and focuses and pre-natal, and post partum care of mother and baby, lactation counseling and other areas of care. How can I go about this? Is it with in the "scope of practice" of and RN to offer these services to individuals. I have researched this concept and it seems that it would be both lucrative and enjoyable but I want to make sure I have the logistics and legalities in order. Thoughts?
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 4,047 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 4 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    That sounds very similar to a midwife; not a bad idea, but I would think that even if it falls into the scope of practice in your state, you would need to be able to prove your expertise to potential clients with certifications, experience and the like. Is this an area in which you work now? Also start with assessing customer base/need.

    Other than that I'd recommend having a business manager - someone to manage the money, bills, etc. It's next to impossible to run a business AND provide quality care. I've worked for providers who have and have not employed business managers with their practice and the difference is startling. I don't feel like a provider who also directly runs and monitors the day to day business aspects of a practice can be totally committed to providing care a lot of patients need d/t a preoccupation with the financial bottom line. There's gonna be a battle of values.

    Of course this is just my opinion
    lindarn likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from TheOracle
    That sounds very similar to a midwife; not a bad idea, but I would think that even if it falls into the scope of practice in your state, you would need to be able to prove your expertise to potential clients with certifications, experience and the like. Is this an area in which you work now? Also start with assessing customer base/need.
    Actually, what you are describing does NOT sound like a midwife- it sounds like a doula or monitrice. Doula work is perfectly within your scope; monitrice work gets tricky because you are actually assessing/monitoring. If you are not attending the actual labor, then you should be just fine- PP and antenatal monitoring are definitely within your scope, as long as the mother is still seeing her midwife/OB as scheduled.

    If you are attending the birth, I would only act in a doula role. No "nursing" care. There is too much liability. JMO (says the RN/CPM)

    Do you current work in maternal/child health? You could easily take a doula course and maybe get certified in childbirth education-that would be a GREAT service to offer! Are you interested in home birth?
    lindarn likes this.
  7. 0
    Thank you for the comments it really helps. I am looking into acquiring CLC (lactation counseling certification) as well as taking some other relevant training courses to help better prepare myself for this possibility. I would certainly NOT be taking the place of regular pre-natal care, and would only attend the birth at the client's request. I know this may sound strange, but I am currently working in home health, not OB/Gyn, however working in home health has offered me unique perspective on the importance of quality, individualized and specialized patient care which I think can be valuable in this potential venture. I am also a mother of 2 and have counseled many friends through pregnancy and childbirth etc...I know that is not a qualifying factor as to my abilities , but it certainly encourages me to want to move forward with this...

    Other thoughts?
  8. 0
    This is what labor and postpartum Doulas do. Check out the national doula organization Doulas of North America (DONA)
    I think that show "pregnant in high heels" created this buzz about "maternity concierge"
    but really, this is what Doulas have been doing for a long long time, check it out. I am a Doula and a Labor & Delivery Nurse. Both roles are very separate and different. Doulas do not provide medical care or advice, but do provide physical and emotional support, as well as breastfeeding teaching and support, and postpartum care. A great career choice! but doesnt pay as well as nursing :-(

    Quote from miropp
    I need some advice. I was considering starting my own "concierge nursing service" if you will that caters mostly to pregnant women and focuses and pre-natal, and post partum care of mother and baby, lactation counseling and other areas of care. How can I go about this? Is it with in the "scope of practice" of and RN to offer these services to individuals. I have researched this concept and it seems that it would be both lucrative and enjoyable but I want to make sure I have the logistics and legalities in order. Thoughts?


Top