Why can't nurses intubate?

  1. 0 Paramedics and Doctors intubate, why can't nurses?
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  3. Visit  natnat122 profile page

    About natnat122, ASN, EMT-P

    From 'NY, US'; Joined Aug '11; Posts: 476; Likes: 170.

    104 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  prnqday profile page
    24
    No thanks!
    Quote from natnat122
    Paramedics and Doctors intubate, why can't nurses?
  5. Visit  pookyp profile page
    4
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    No thanks!
    Lol!!!!
  6. Visit  RNFiona profile page
    11
    Why would you WANT to? I certainly don't. I have enough to do.
    PerfectlyNumb, Jessy_RN, poppycat, and 8 others like this.
  7. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    5
    Quote from RNFiona
    Why would you WANT to? I certainly don't. I have enough to do.
    I can see the need for us too---I for one would love to be able to, our facility is tiny, sometimes one doc misses or can't do it and we are stuck waiting for anesthesia to come in, if nurses could do it we'd at least have a fighting cjance

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    willachieve, monkeybug, crb613, and 2 others like this.
  8. Visit  natnat122 profile page
    2
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    No thanks!
    Lmbo!!!

    Aw come onnn it's fun!
    ajmclean and NutmeggeRN like this.
  9. Visit  natnat122 profile page
    1
    Quote from itsnowornever
    I can see the need for us too---I for one would love to be able to, our facility is tiny, sometimes one doc misses or can't do it and we are stuck waiting for anesthesia to come in, if nurses could do it we'd at least have a fighting cjance

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
    I agree!
    sallyrnrrt likes this.
  10. Visit  DeBerham profile page
    7
    I believe it's more facility driven than state mandated. I imagine it probably comes down to liability, most nurses wouldn't be doing enough intubations to remain proficient, and the last thing you want in a code is someone who is not confident, or even worse over confident in their skill set attempting an intubation. There are hospitals, where I do believe that SOME nurses can intubate a patient, but these are few and far between. So long as they are competent I have no issue with this. That being said, the typical nurse on a floor or unit has no business sticking a tube down anyone's throat. In the hospital setting, quite frankly, bagging a patient will get you by for the couple of minutes while you wait for the code team to arrive. The LAST thing that I would want is some cowboy (or cowgirl) who works in an outpatient clinic attempting an intubation on a patient simply because they believe that the can or should. I would rather have that person using a good old fashioned BVM, provide adequate breaths, and begin whatever protocol is appropriate in that situation. When it comes down to it, in a code, time to intubation is not a factor when saving someones life so long as an airway is maintained.
  11. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    3
    Quote from DeBerham
    I believe it's more fascility driven than state mandated. I imagine it probably comes down to liability, most nurses wouldn't be doing enough intubations to remain proficient, and the last thing you want in a code is someone who is not confident, or even worse over confident in their skill set attempting an intubation. In the hospital setting, quite frankly, bagging a patient will get you by for the couple of minutes while you wait for the code team to arrive. The LAST thing that I would want is some cowboy (or cowgirl) who works in an outpatient clinic attempting an intubation on a patient simply because the state says you can. When it comes down to it, in a code, time to intubation is not a factor when saving someones life so long as a airway is maintained.
    Completely true, but in some instances you can't maintain an airway without the intubation. It's a slippery slope, but we need a middle ground

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
  12. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    8
    It is a facility driven mandate. Nurses intubate IF they are covered by the facility policy. The problem is...nurses have so many other responsibilities to add that one isn't the best case scenario when there are others that can maintain a higher competency and frequency to ensure success.

    I have worked at a facility that the designated code team (it was run like the present rapid response team) could intubate...in the days before hospitalists and the ED doc was the only other person who intubated. I have also worked at facilities that allow their respiratory therapists intubate...which when you think about it makes sense.

    Nurses can when covered by facility policy and properly trained and not just ACLS. I would rather see LMA's on crash carts and the ICU code nurses trained in their use.
  13. Visit  dah doh profile page
    7
    No reason for it at my facility! Some of our experienced respiratory therapists can still intubate. We have medical interns and residents, pulmonologists, some attending doctors, and also have a minimum of 3 anesthesiologists available. My favorite story happened late at night; this one internal medicine attending doctor was walking by a coding patient's room that the medical intern and resident couldn't intubate. This doctor came in to check on us because of the commotion; intubated and placed a central line on this patient who he actually was not even seeing just because help was needed. Then we found out he hadn't intubated or placed a central line in over 20 yrs during his residency! Apparently he's still "got it"!
    casi, sallyrnrrt, Anonymous865, and 4 others like this.
  14. Visit  All4NursingRN profile page
    1
    Do CRNA's even intubate on a regular basis? pardon me if that's an ignorant question.
    sallyrnrrt likes this.
  15. Visit  sserrn profile page
    2
    Yes, all the time
    sallyrnrrt and Esme12 like this.


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