What was the MOST ridiculous thing a patient came to the ER for? - page 162

and do you have to treat them? I am just curious. Your stories always seem to either crack me up or shake my head in amazement. Thanks for sharing :)... Read More

  1. by   Christy1019
    Quote from ceres24
    one am shift, our er door blasted open and a guy came and shouted 'i need help. theres something wrong with my sister'. being an ER nurse, I have seen quite a lot of 'stuff' already. I remained calmed and told him bring the patient inside. and they did, him and another guy carry this woman, one holding the hands, the other guy on her feet. woman seems unconscious. i told them lay the patient in the stretcher while getting oxygen cannula, a pulse oxy and bp app. when i approached the patient, i noticed tears running from her eyes. immediately i asked, did you broke up with your bf? or if youre married did you had a fight. she opened her eyes, told me ' its been 2 years since we broke up. but it still brings memories'

    blah.
    I've been around the ER block a few times so I get what your saying, but if someone comes in yelling help, someone outside isn't acting right, I sure as heck wouldn't tell THEM to bring the pt in, nor would my initial assumption be that she had a bad breakup. Maybe that's just me though... I'm glad you were right in this situation, but if I was "carried in" by my family and that was the first thing I was asked, I'd be royally ticked off.

    Sorry to hijack the thread, please continue with your regularly scheduled program...
  2. by   BendyEm
    I've had to be one of 'those patients' against my will a few times throughout my training.
    Halfway through my training I'd started getting dizzy/passing out and eventually got diagnosed with POTs. In a manual handling session that lasted 4 hours, no drink breaks with poor ventilation, I got a bit dizzy. About 15minutes before the end, I asked if I could take 5minutes in the corridor, with some fresh air.
    The instructor decided to call the Head of year. The Head of year decided to call my tutor. My tutor decided to call the head of the School of Nursing. All 3 showed up, and after half an hour of trying to explain that "this is normal, I just need fresh air, water and rest." they decided to take me downstairs to A&E. On a wheelchair. In my nursing uniform. Through all the other students that were waiting to use the room next.

    I spent the next 7hrs repeatedly explaining my condition, and that I didn't want to be admitted. I had tests run, ECGs, fluids given. Only one person believed that it might have anything to do with the POTs. As it was, my flat mates who could have made sure I was safe on the bus had now left, so I had no way home.

    Eventually I got told "There's no sign of it, but we think you have an ear infection. Here's a prescription for antibiotics and your discharge letter."
    I checked with 3 nurses, a doctor and the nurse in charge that there was nothing more they needed to do, and she assured me it was all taken care of, and that I should leave ASAP.

    I took two steps before turning back and leaning over to grab some gauze, and a vomit bowl. There, in front of her, I took out the cannula they'd forgotten (I'd reminded them 6times at this point), dropped it in the vomit bowl and taped myself up with the tape on my lanyard. "I hope I didn't still need that." Then I went at sat in the hallway just outside for an hour before someone could pick me up.

    Same thing happened again, after qualifying, though now my dizziness comes with chest pains occasionally. Night shift, last 2 hours. I've been feeling the chest pain for maybe 30minutes. Nurse in charge notices when a patient wakes up, looks at me and says "You should go home!" Full monitoring goes on, she calls the night doctor, makes a nurse sit with me.
    I told her if it continued after the shift I'd go to my GP, but she wasn't having it.
    I find myself again, being wheeled down to A&E in my uniform, with two nurses escorting me. 12hrs later, fluid, bloods, urine, chest X-ray, 2hrly ECGs (all done by nurses I graduated with) and "You're probably getting an ear infection."
  3. by   gospa
    Here's a good one. Few months back, someone comes in by EMS for dizzyness. When did it start? "Someone rang my doorbell at 10 p.m. and when I opened the door there was a brownie on the ground. I ate it and I've felt really weird since." Who the heck eats food randomly found food at their doorstep.
    Imagine their luck, it was the special brownie.
  4. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from gospa
    Here's a good one. Few months back, someone comes in by EMS for dizzyness. When did it start? "Someone rang my doorbell at 10 p.m. and when I opened the door there was a brownie on the ground. I ate it and I've felt really weird since." Who the heck eats food randomly found food at their doorstep.
    Imagine their luck, it was the special brownie.
    This sounds like a cover story to be able to explain why they'd be positive for THC in a drug screen. We get people coming to the ER who want specific meds to cover themselves in case of the random drug screens of which the Army is so fond.
  5. by   Momma1RN
    Quote from gospa
    Here's a good one. Few months back, someone comes in by EMS for dizzyness. When did it start? "Someone rang my doorbell at 10 p.m. and when I opened the door there was a brownie on the ground. I ate it and I've felt really weird since." Who the heck eats food randomly found food at their doorstep.
    Imagine their luck, it was the special brownie.
    This is amazing haha. We got a lady in her 70s whose family made her some bacon in marijuana oil (who knew that was a thing) and she arrived feeling dizzy and hallucinating. Hahaha.
  6. by   skylark
    Quote from Momma1RN
    This is amazing haha. We got a lady in her 70s whose family made her some bacon in marijuana oil (who knew that was a thing) and she arrived feeling dizzy and hallucinating. Hahaha.
    Reminds me of another of my favorite senior patients.
    84 year old guy from an assisted living, likes to smoke weed and on one occasion it wasn't right, he thought it was cocaine instead and that his family had brought it by mistake.
    His solution? Visit his neighbor and shoot up heroin to take away the nausea he had from the coke.

    I think I need to move to another city, this one is just too weird for me : )
  7. by   Jasel
    Yesterday morning at 0630 had a 71 year old man come via ambulance to the ER for some swelling in his left nostril. Denied any pain unless he put his finger in his nose and pushed down on it hard which he was more than willing to show me. No other complaints. EMS just walked him in.
  8. by   Jmarty31
    This was supposed to be a reply to someone... Anyway... Once someone hadn't eaten all day and had a headache. (Not homeless)
  9. by   emtpbill
    Quote from Jmarty31
    This was supposed to be a reply to someone... Anyway... Once someone hadn't eaten all day and had a headache. (Not homeless)
    Stupidity keeps us in business!
  10. by   Jmarty31
    Quote from emtpbill
    Stupidity keeps us in business!
    Agreed! There's more I could go on and on and on in every situation... Strangers ... Sorry sorry didn't mean to sing. Anyway yes
  11. by   Pixie.RN
    Blue hands ... new jeans. By EMS. lol
  12. by   FineAgain
    21 years old, called an ambulance because she "s*%t herself". Didn't take a shower, didn't change her clothes. Glad she wasn't mine although we all enjoyed the ambiance.
  13. by   Pixie.RN
    "Belly rubin." Hahaha.

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