What does it take to be considered for an ER position as a New Graduate RN?

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    I am new graduate RN really committed to landing a ER position and was just wondering what it takes for me to be considered into a program. Aside from having experience, BLS, ACLS, and PALS, what can I do to make myself standout to nursing recruiters?

    I recently started at a skilled nursing facility/acute rehabilitation so that I would be able utilize and develop some skills while I wait and pray to get accepted into acute care hospital. I am very grateful for the opportunity given to me at the SNF, but would really want to gain experience in acute care, specifically ER.

    I've had experience as a student nurse extern on a medical-surgical floor, but thats about it. New grads, seasoned ER nurses, whomever who can provide advice on applications, resumes, etc are welcomed. Thanks in advance!
    Last edit by Joe V on Jan 24, '12 : Reason: spacing
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    As a nurse with 1yr experience who was hired to the ED as a new grad, having my EMT-B (with experience) helped, as was having completed my internship in the ED before graduation.

    I actually think that anyone, new grad or not, considering an ED job should sit through an EMT-B class at some point. It helps to understand what happens to our patients before they arrive in our ambulance bay.
    k31kozumi and Esme12 like this.
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    Being an emt is a definite plusIm not too sure exactly if you need any actual ER experience to take the CEN exam... But pass that and youll stand out the most
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    1 yr of ED experience is recommended, but not required, to sit the CEN exam. However, it's your money to take the test...
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    Some even recommend 2 years experience before taking the CEN. I would hold off taking the CEN without real-life experience to fall back on, but like TheSquire said, it's your money.. I second the EMT experience. You could get your EMT and work either in the field or in a hospital as a tech while waiting to get an RN position.
    Esme12 likes this.
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    I did an internship there through my school as a student nurse, so they took me on as a new grad.
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    unquestionably, locate a hospital with a preceptor program. moreover, working in the er is a different environment than other areas of the hospital and takes additional skills. following this further, with the nursing experience being assigned to a preceptor it will help you make the transition to er work. therefore, call hospitals & speak to the nursing director to inquire about a preceptor program. in addition, learn to work effectively as part of a team, er nurses work very closely with other members of the health care team. undoubtedly, e.r. situations are stressful & fast paced emotions can run high, er nurses need to be calm; efficient and work as part of a team. no one can deny, it is very helpful to get your cen under your belt, however, take your time before you take this step, since it is an expense that some hospitals would reimburse. lastly, try to make friends with an e.r. nurse in your area, you never know when someone may leave and (he or she) can refer you to their manager. good luck in all of your future endeavors...ciao~

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  10. 1
    Certified Emergency Nurse Exam

    The Board of Certification for Emergency Nursing (BCEN) created the Certified Emergency Nurse (CEN) exam to verify and measure the knowledge and skills of emergency nurses ('www.ena.org'). The test was first administrated in July 1980 and the American Board of Nursing Specialties accredited the test in February 2002.

    The CEN exam is a comprehensive examination that covers a range of topics related to emergency nursing and medicine, such as the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, gynecology, neurology, orthopedics and psychology. The CEN exam also covers specific types of duties that an emergency nurse handles, including wound care, substance abuse and shock. According to the BCEN, the overall goal of the test is to ensure nurses that pass the test are knowledgeable and skilled in every area aspect necessary for providing excellent nursing care in an emergency setting.
    http://www.bcencertifications.org/ce...es/CENFAQ.aspx
    http://www.ccrn-cen-central.com/

    CEN exam applicants must be RNs with a current and unrestricted license, including probation or any limitation in function or duties. A disability does not count as a restriction and if there is pending action against a nurse's license then she or he may be able to take the exam as long as duties are not restricted and approval is given by the BCEN.
    It is also recommended, but not mandatory, that a nurse has two years of experience in emergency nursing or comparable area. There are three options for CEN certification renewal, which must be done every four years, including Internet testing, traditional exam and continuing education credit.

    Although it can be done, I HIGHLY recommend waiting to take the CEN until you have some experience under your belt. It's an expansive test. I would look into ENPC, TNCC and CATN.
    http://www.ena.org/coursesandeducati...s/Default.aspx
    http://www.ena.org/coursesandeducati...s/Default.aspx

    I wish you the best!
    k31kozumi likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from mikeynizm
    I am new graduate RN really committed to landing a ER position and was just wondering what it takes for me to be considered into a program. Aside from having experience, BLS, ACLS, and PALS, what can I do to make myself standout to nursing recruiters. I recently started at a skilled nursing facility/acute rehabilitation so that I would be able utilize and develop some skills while I wait and pray to get accepted into acute care hospital. I am very grateful for the opportunity given to me at the SNF, but would really want to gain experience in acute care, specifically ER. I've had experience as a student nurse extern on a medical-surgical floor, but thats about it. New grads, seasoned ER nurses, whomever who can provide advice on applications, resumes, etc are welcomed. Thanks in advance!
    It would help to work in the emergency room as a nursing assistant. At the hospital that I work at, they have a nurse residency program in the ER for new grads but they have to have worked as a nursing assistant in the ER (specifically) to be hired. Hope this helps!
  12. 1
    Quote from unc hopeful
    It would help to work in the emergency room as a nursing assistant. At the hospital that I work at, they have a nurse residency program in the ER for new grads but they have to have worked as a nursing assistant in the ER (specifically) to be hired. Hope this helps!
    My department does not hire aides. The department is staffed by EMT-Paramedics, RN's, and MD's. The director is a fan of new grads though, so while we have a lot of very experienced nurses, we also get lots of new grads. It will all depend on the director. Getting your ACLS, PALS, and NRP will help. Knowing someone helps too!
    k31kozumi likes this.


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