What do you see in a Level 4 ER?

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    Any input is appreciated. Thanks!
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    I was not aware there is such a thing as level 4, unless you mean non trauma facility where basic medical care is provided? I understand the Trauma Centers go from 1 to 3.
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    Well in some states, like here, they range from level 1 (comprehensive) to level 4 (basic). I was just wondering what types of patients come through those facilities.
    Esme12 likes this.
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    Probably your more "urgent care" scenarios as well as the occasional chest pain, stroke, over dose where it would all be stabilized and transported out. That's what is think anyway

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
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    Level IV essentially says "We recognize that on occasion people suffer serious traumatic injuries. We also recognize they don't need to be here"
    krazievi3t6url likes this.
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    Often times Trauma IV hospitals are critical access hospitals (in my area) they can and do treat trauma patients of all levels but stabilize and ship them to bigger trauma centers. They have trauma trained nurses, protocols in place, and have to submit for their trauma designation just like a level 1 trauma center has to.

    They are not "urgent care" but small hospitals with sometimes 25 inpatient beds. You'd be surprised at the crazy traumas these places get--being the ONLY hospital in a given area, all patients would come to you and you wouldn't have much in the form of resources that larger hospitals have.
    Altra, Esme12, and NurseOnAMotorcycle like this.
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    Quote from Larry77
    Often times Trauma IV hospitals are critical access hospitals (in my area) they can and do treat trauma patients of all levels but stabilize and ship them to bigger trauma centers. They have trauma trained nurses, protocols in place, and have to submit for their trauma designation just like a level 1 trauma center has to.

    They are not "urgent care" but small hospitals with sometimes 25 inpatient beds. You'd be surprised at the crazy traumas these places get--being the ONLY hospital in a given area, all patients would come to you and you wouldn't have much in the form of resources that larger hospitals have.
    This makes sense. I have never heard of a IV so I was taking a shot in the dark, so to offend you.

    Posting from my phone, ease forgive my fat thumbs!
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    Quote from itfeelsgr82savealife
    Any input is appreciated. Thanks!
    Level IV centers sometime see the worst traumas as they are far from large trauma facilities where transport from the site is not possible especially when the weather doesn't provide for flying.

    The ER's in those places are usually pretty functional in acute care as they see much more than the floors or ICU's ever do because these patients are transferred after "stabilization.

    You wide see a wide variety of patients there.....those places can really be busy!
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    A trauma center is a hospital that is designated by a state or local authority or is verified by the American College of Surgeons

    Level I
    A Level I Trauma Center provides the highest level of surgical care to trauma patients. Being treated at a Level I Trauma Center increases a seriously injured patient’s chances of survival by an estimated 20 to 25 percent versus not going to the hospital. It has a full range of specialists and equipment available 24 hours a day and admits a minimum required annual volume of severely injured patients. A Level I trauma center is required to have a certain number of surgeons, emergency physicians and anesthesiologists on duty 24 hours a day at the hospital, an education program, and preventive and outreach programs. Key elements include 24-hour in-house coverage by general surgeons and prompt availability of care in varying specialties—such as orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, plastic surgery (plastic surgeons often take calls for hand injuries), anesthesiology, emergency medicine, radiology, internal medicine, oral and maxillofacial surgery (trained to treat injuries of the facial skin, muscles, bones), and critical care—which are needed to adequately respond and care for various forms of trauma that a patient may suffer. Additionally, a Level I center has a program of research, is a leader in trauma education and injury prevention, and is a referral resource for communities in nearby regions.

    Level II

    A Level II trauma center works in collaboration with a Level I center. It provides comprehensive trauma care and supplements the clinical expertise of a Level I institution. It provides 24-hour availability of all essential specialties, personnel, and equipment. Minimum volume requirements may depend on local conditions. These institutions are not required to have an ongoing program of research or a surgical residency program.

    Level III
    A Level III trauma center does not have the full availability of specialists, but does have resources for emergency resuscitation, surgery, and intensive care of most trauma patients. A Level III center has transfer agreements with Level I or Level II trauma centers that provide back-up resources for the care of exceptionally severe injuries, Example: Rural or Community hospitals.

    Level IV
    A Level IV trauma center exists in some states where the resources do not exist for a Level III trauma center. It provides initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities, and transfer to a higher level of care. It may also provide surgery and critical-care services, as defined in the scope of services for trauma care. A trauma-trained nurse is immediately available, and physicians are available upon the patient's arrival to the Emergency Department. Transfer agreements exist with other trauma centers of higher levels, for use when conditions warrant a transfer.

    Level V

    Provides initial evaluation, stabilization, diagnostic capabilities, and transfer to a higher level of care. May provide surgical and critical-care services, as defined in the service's scope of trauma-care services. A trauma-trained nurse is immediately available, and physicians are available upon patient arrival in the Emergency Department. If not open 24 hours daily, the facility must have an after-hours trauma response protocol.

    Pediatric Trauma Centers
    A facility can be designated an adult Trauma Center, a pediatric Trauma Center, or an adult & pediatric Trauma Center. If a hospital provides trauma care to both adult and pediatric patients, the Level designation may not be the same for each group. For example, a Level 1 adult Trauma Center may also be a Level 2 pediatric Trauma Center. This is because pediatric trauma surgery is a specialty unto itself. Adult trauma surgeons are not generally specialized in providing surgical trauma care to children, and vice versa, and the difference in practice is significant.

    Not that I'm a huge wiki fan this is a good depiction......Trauma center - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    LakeEmerald and krazievi3t6url like this.
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    No offense to me...I was just trying to clear it up a little. I don't work in a trauma IV hospital ;-)


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