WARSWITHFLOORS/Round 99,999

  1. Looking for a good faxed report form.
    Anyone using one that seems to placate floor and ER nurses?
    A one-pager is what I am looking for.....
    Pithy but good.
    THanks,
    Peace to the floor girls....
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   suebird3
    Post moved for more responses.

    Suebird
  4. by   Larry77
    We have one called "SBAR" stands for Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendations...If your interested I am willing to scan it into my PC and email it to you.

    We don't really use it much but is good for new nurses or nurses who have never worked the floors and aren't sure what the floors need to know.
  5. by   mmutk
    We use an SBAR here to suit JCAHO and the floors, but it's a pain in the but for ER nurses it's like rewriting the whole chart all over again.
  6. by   nuangel1
    we use a summary form it has pt's usual info :name ,sex ,dx ,md.hpi.pmh,allergies.
    meds given,iv,iv fluids if any ,blood hanging if any ,abnormal tests ,
    vital signs,any o2 ,code status,belongings sent home or with pt .then space at bottom for anything else needed.we fax this standard form which we complete on all admits .they have 15 min then if bed ready pt is sent up.
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    I walk around the corner from the ER to the acute floor and give a verbal report. Also, the ER chart is made part of the acute chart so the floor nurses can read that too.

    (Small rural hospital).

    steph
  8. by   Dinith88
    Quote from LooAndDoo
    Looking for a good faxed report form.
    Anyone using one that seems to placate floor and ER nurses?
    A one-pager is what I am looking for.....
    Pithy but good.
    THanks,
    Peace to the floor girls....
    The er at my place of employement does not use a 'form' for the er nurses to give report. It seems to me a bit of an insult. Do you honestly need a 'guide' for giving report? Sure...some er nurses give a lousy floor-type report, but others are good at spinning a tale and telling the patient's story. Was there some issue with a different department? It seems a competent nurse wouldnt need a 'guide' to hold her hand????
  9. by   NYCRN16
    Quote from Dinith88
    The er at my place of employement does not use a 'form' for the er nurses to give report. It seems to me a bit of an insult. Do you honestly need a 'guide' for giving report? Sure...some er nurses give a lousy floor-type report, but others are good at spinning a tale and telling the patient's story. Was there some issue with a different department? It seems a competent nurse wouldnt need a 'guide' to hold her hand????

    A faxed report is the best thing that we have found, because first off, trying to get the nurse on the phone is a few hour ordeal, secondly, they are asking questions that are not priorities for ER nurses. I may not remember if the patient has a stage I decubius ulcer or something like that, and if you forget to tell them that they get mad. Sorry, but total skin care is not my priority. Getting the patient stable to go up to the floor is. You can be "competent" and just busy, so you dont have time to give a head to toe assessment report on every patient you have. You will get to know the important things and then you can read the chart. If this is an ICU patient it is different, but this is the floor.
  10. by   CritterLover
    [font="comic sans ms"]we used to use a form that had room for basics such as name/dx/rm #/assessment abnormalities/vs/iv site/meds given/i/o. i didn't really like it, i thought there was a lot of stuff missing. i mean, no place for the admitting doctor, medical hx, abnormal labs.... we would tube the report up, and the patient would soon follow. actually, from what i understand, the patient often got there first.

    my hospital went to this because of how tough it could be to get someone on the phone to give report to.

    anyway, with the new caregiver communication issue with joint commission, the tubed report is no longer ok, we have to call report so the person receiving report has the opportunity to ask questions. i actually like it better this way (maybe i'm weird), though it does get frustrating when i get asked a question that i had already answered. ("do they have an iv?" "um, yeah...that sc tlc i told you that the doc put in....")

    when we switched back to the verbal report, the big concern was getting someone to actually come to the phone and take report. they have been told that they have to take report within 15 min. if they can't, then the charge nurse has to take the report. end of story. so far, no problems. i'm sure there were come a day when even the carge nurse is too busy to take report, and there will be a big scene about it all. i only hope that whomever is trying to call report has the good sense to realize that if even the charge nurse is too busy to take report, then it is probably not a good idea for the patient to go up at that time. (i know this isn't the case in all hospitals, but at least in the one i work out, they have good charges who don't tend to play games).
  11. by   chip193
    Quote from Dinith88
    The er at my place of employement does not use a 'form' for the er nurses to give report. It seems to me a bit of an insult. Do you honestly need a 'guide' for giving report? Sure...some er nurses give a lousy floor-type report, but others are good at spinning a tale and telling the patient's story. Was there some issue with a different department? It seems a competent nurse wouldnt need a 'guide' to hold her hand????
    We use one here - and it's what the floor takes report on. So it makes it go faster if we have it.

    Our rule is simple - one attempt to call, and if noone will take report, fax it and send the patient.

    Chip

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