Sloppiness results in write-up - page 3

Hell again, If you have read my previous posts, I am a new grad in the ER since June of this year. Yesterday I was called to my directors office, because one of the Docs had written me up.... Read More

  1. by   gam3rchic
    All i got to say is, if i were thrown on probation when I was a new nurse, for every time I forgot to chart something by accident or misspelled something, I would never have gotten off orientation! Those were honest, simple mistakes, and NO ONE HERE can claim they NEVER forgot to chart something or misspelled a medication!

    Oh, and about the CP, if the doctor thought it was cardiac, he would not have ordered Toradol (unless he's a complete idiot, which he might be) and the fact that he yelled at you was completely unprofessional. There is no excuse for that kind of belittling, no matter what the mistake. If a mistake is made, it needs to be addressed professionally. That doctor should've been written up, not you.

    Also, no nurse here can say they've never assumed a route when taking a verbal order, and while I'm not condoning this, we've all done it! Mistakes are much more easier to be made this way, which is why verbal orders should not be made, unless in an emergency...he should've written that order for you in the FIRST PLACE.

    If I were you, I wouldn't put up with all the crap there, but if you really want to stick it out, good luck to you. I just think our jobs as nurses is hard enough without all this crap. You did not deserve probation for those simple mistakes...you sound like an awesome nurse. Good luck to you!
  2. by   Djuna
    [quote=gam3rchic;2487425]all i got to say is, if i were thrown on probation when i was a new nurse, for every time i forgot to chart something by accident or misspelled something, i would never have gotten off orientation! those were honest, simple mistakes, and no one here can claim they never forgot to chart something or misspelled a medication!

    i have to respectfully disagree with this statement. in an er you never forget to do vitals, that is part of your role when you triage a patient. how can you possibly assess a person without doing baseline observations? it isn't a matter of a simple mistake, it had the potential to be very serious.

    i work in er and we have new graduate rns rotating through our department for 6-8 weeks at a time. there are few new grads who can pick up and run with the ball and in general i don't think er is a good place to start your nursing career, but that's just my personal opinion.

    to the op, good luck in your job, your er seems supportive and i'm sure you'll be fine once you start feeling confident in your skills.
  3. by   gam3rchic
    I believe she said she forgot to "put the vitals in" as in forgetting to put the vitals in the computer for charting, not forgot to take vitals altogether! Maybe the OP can shed some light on this?
  4. by   Noryn
    Yeah I took it as she did the vitals but forgot to put them in the computer.

    But the ER is rough, especially for a new grad. I have seen seasoned nurses cry when pulled to the ER.
  5. by   longjourneydream
    Quote from noryn
    yeah i took it as she did the vitals but forgot to put them in the computer.

    but the er is rough, especially for a new grad. i have seen seasoned nurses cry when pulled to the er.

    hello all,

    clarifications: triage meant bedside triage, as ems brings them in.
    yes. i did hook them up for vitals just forgot to put them on the triage sheet.
    meds that were spelled wrong were mis-spelled due to sloppiness, on my part, will not do again.

    orientation was in the works before the write up, it just enforced commitment to help me.



    i thank you for all your support and advise so far.

    i went to work yesterday, and it was an eye opener.

    i have so many supporters, i was amazed.

    they are dedicating this 40+ year veteran to me,for 60 days.

    we will work together, and we will be taking the hardest patients that come through the door.

    this is what i wanted to begin with;more orientation, but i did not expect it to be like this.

    they want me to be able to function through season, and they know, i can do it.

    i am pleased with the support and encouragment so far.

    i owe myself,as well as my co-workers/supporters.


    i will stay...

    the doctor that wrote me up has been very supportive to me as well.
    Last edit by longjourneydream on Nov 10, '07
  6. by   Djuna
    cweeks, you sound like an amazing nurse, I wish you all the best for your future. It's just wonderful to see a new grad not buckle and give up in the face of pressure and difficulty. You've done so well
  7. by   sashaETDRN
    CWEEKS,
    DON'T WORRY, KEEP YOUR HEAD UP!!! THERE ARE ALWAYS GOOD AND BAD DAYS IN THE ER!! fROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, DON'T EVER ASSUME ANYTHING OR DOWNPLAY A PATIENT'S SYMPTOMS WITH ANY PATIENTS, I LEARNED THIS THE HARD WAY. iF YOU DON'T THINK ITS CARDIAC IN NATURE, ASK THE MD WHAT HE THINKS, THEY WILL RESPECT YOU FOR ASKING, EVEN IF IF THEY THINK ITS NOT CARDIAC EITHER. uSUALLY THE ER DOCS ARE HELPFUL IF YOU ASK QUESTIONS, ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVEN'T WORKED WITH THEM BEFORE, THEY LIKE TO SEE YOU ASK MANY QUESTIONS ABOUT THEY WAY THEY TREAT PATIENTS, B/C EVERY DOC IS DIFFERENT.
    ASK YOUR PRECEPTOR EVERYTHING, WHAT IS THE WORST SHE CAN SAY, SHE ASKS A LOT OF QUESTIONS??? NO!!!
    GOOD LUCK LADY!
  8. by   bigsyis
    cweeks, like I said in my original response to your thread, the ER and MD obviously recognize some serious value in you to give you this opportunity. If you are with the most experienced nurse and are going to get the worst patients, you are going to see SOME stuff! I almost envy you. The "worst cases" in the ER covers a very broad spectrum of illnesses and injuries. Keep your eyes open and learn all you can. They obviously feel that you are the candidate for them or they would've greased the skids to get you out of there, not tried to make the transition easier and more thorough for you.
  9. by   sheluke
    Just one addition to this interesting and very insightful thread-amazing the different opinions! Whether ER or anywhere, I believe it is your attitude 'cweeks' that has garnered you everyone's support in the ER.

    I mean that entirely positive-as nurses, (not everyone, of course) there seems to be frequently many who takes things too personally, or are a bit oversensitive to any criticism. I think some learn through the years to not be defensive but to listen and see if there is validity and room for growth, learning while others decide to 'take a stand' and place the accountability elsewhere whenever criticized.

    As a new nurse, your willingness to accept criticism, to learn from your mistakes (which we all have made at some point, none are perfect) and willingness to continue working hard, will take you far, whether you stay in the ER for 20 years or try ten different nursing arenas. You've 'survived' this and persevered-that also often gains respect amongst your peers.

    Best of luck and keep giving your best wherever you are!
  10. by   longjourneydream
    Hello again.

    It has been 60 days since the incident.

    Well,

    Progress has been made, and I have had training.

    I feel more confident but I DO NOT FEEL SAFE...

    I have decided to go up to the medical telemetry floor, which is slower paced, to learn more delegation,triage,and priority skills.

    After 6 months to one year go back to ER or possibly go to critical care.

    ER is fast paced, and I feel mistakes could be made, if my confidence level does not match the environment.

    I feel due to the high volume of cardiac patients that we see in a high geriatric setting, that I need stronger cardiac assessment skills.

    My goal now for the new year is:

    1. Become a strong leader, and a safe nurse.

    2. Be a strong team player when a code takes place.

    3. Be strong in cardiac strip identifications.

    4. Master my job.

    I start the new floor January 7th, I AM EXCITED!!!!!

    Happy New Year!!!
  11. by   bigsyis
    Congratulations, and good luck! I think your reasoning and plan is sound. Good job.
  12. by   ERbunny
    Congratulations on being so self aware and flexible. Very few people have the insight you have shown. I think your plan is wonderful. As long as you feel unsafe in the ED, you will BE unsafe. You will gain even more knowledge than you have listed in your time on the telemetry unit. My 38 years have all been critical care and emergency nursing, but I have always held a high regard for what floor nurses do. Best wishes to you in your endeavors, and please keep us up to date on how it is going. Your patients are fortunate to have such a caring nurse.
  13. by   bthynn
    Well I read thru these posts and there is not much to add...

    I think the fact that they realize they failed you in orientation and are going to give you more is a good thing...alot of times orientations for new grads are cut short and they are just thrown to the wolves...which is not good.


    But, look at your hospital's policy on Chest Pains...most get at least an INT..you never know tillthe labs are back if it is true cardiac or not...and EKG is not diagnostic of cardiac only ischemia due to cardiac.

    Keep learning thats what nursing is all about...when you think there is nothingmore to learn then it is time to get out of nursing.....

    Good Luck and hope you enjoy the ER as much as I do!!

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