Please be prepared for your interview... - page 2

by Larry77

21,379 Views | 72 Comments

We have been doing interviews for a new hospital that's opening so we are looking for 50 ED people. After the first day I was really surprised at the amount of people who were not prepared for their interview. We had some well... Read More


  1. 9
    Quote from wooh
    I'd prefer someone fat to someone that doesn't even know the name of a major hospital regulation would be HIPAA, not "hippa."

    Sweet charm, Nascar nurse, jalyc RN, and 6 others like this.
  2. 7
    1) Do you under staff?2) Do you have a one-month Preceptor program?3) Do you list the pay scale up front?4) Are the doctors respectful to the nurses?5). No one is interested in your hospital unless you rate A+ in these items. Skill giving interviews does not equate top rate skilled RN's.
    Last edit by laurelember on Feb 19, '13
    jalyc RN, GrnTea, SoldierNurse22, and 4 others like this.
  3. 19
    I have a special needs child and will need 2 afternoons a week off to take him to PT,"
    So you discriminate against people with disabilities Even though it is against FEDERAL LAW to do so. That's why those "high maintenance" people don't say anything up front. They know you will ake up a reason to not hire them. I bet you make up reasons to get rid of them as fast you can, too.
  4. 2
    Quote from mmc51264

    So you discriminate against people with disabilities Even though it is against FEDERAL LAW to do so. That's why those "high maintenance" people don't say anything up front. They know you will ake up a reason to not hire them. I bet you make up reasons to get rid of them as fast you can, too.
    My thoughts exactly...
    SoldierNurse22 and midmichiganRN like this.
  5. 7
    Quote from blondesareeasy
    I've got a ton of experience and a good interviewer should ALWAYS pick up on that. Knowing how long you've been in the previous position, (ER/ICU, etc.) should obviously dictate what you do or don't know. One year in ER? Well, you've got a lot more to see. Ten years in a Level one? Skip the questions and when can you start?
    I slightly disagree with this statement, we are not only hiring experience we are hiring for a good fit. Do I want someone who has been in a level 1 for ten years who is a bear to work with...heck no. But if you are an up-and-comer who has a great personality and has been in a level 3 community hospital who gets all trauma's for 4 years...I want you!

    Plenty of 10+ year ED RN's are not going to make the grade so please don't just expect to get hired because you have experience...still have to make an effort in an interview and be a good fit for our department.

    We actually had a highly experienced nurse today that couldn't think of a "situation when" for 2 different questions...really? You are an ED nurse! We know you have had those situations (ie a "connection" with a patient, or "conflict in the workplace")...but how can we pick you over someone who gets slightly emotional thinking about a touching story or proud about how they handled conflict with a coworker and actually became friends?

    In our situation we are lucky enough to have great recruiter's to work with who screen out the applicants without experience and who may have red flags in their history.

    For those who asked about new grads, we are hiring two nurse interns but they are internal to the system (highly competitive process).
    Surprised1, jalyc RN, hiddencatRN, and 4 others like this.
  6. 4
    Quote from laurelember
    1) Do you under staff?2) Do you have a one-month Preceptor program?3) Do you list the pay scale up front?4) Are the doctors respectful to the nurses?5). No one is interested in your hospital unless you rate A+ in these items. Skill giving interviews does not equate top rate skilled RN's.
    Did you see that this is a "new hospital"?...I would hope that we would not plan on "understaffing", would be terrible foresight IMO. Training is extensive with all employees starting months prior to opening. The docs I have met have been great and the culture we are building is one of team care, not us against the MD's. BTW, I'm certainly NOT on here to recruit...we have more than we need and are in a position to pick the "cream of the crop". Skill sitting in an interview does not necessarily mean you are a good nurse but you must give an effort...was my biggest point, don't assume your experience will get you hired.

    Can we please stop the discrimination topic? I would much rather this thread be about interviewing than about very personal issues like the one used as an example.
    mommaRN29, jalyc RN, hiddencatRN, and 1 other like this.
  7. 6
    I'll be honest and say I was caught off guard and was unprepared for my first interview. I am still mortified with my performance. I came in with hair pulled in a bun, conservative top, no flashy jewelry or makeup, black slacks pressed with closed toed kitten heeled shoes. Cell phone off. Resumes and portfolio ready.

    My mother is a nurse of 36 years and has sat on many interview panels. She said some of the questions I was asked were ones that she would've asked a more experienced nurse. As a a newly graduated nurse, all of my nursing experience has been in clinicals where we have to follow procedures, patient care and protocols to a T. There is no breaking the rules or bypassing the right thing to do, whether you're a student nurse or an experienced nurse, IMO.

    The two questions that really bothered me were 1) Tell me a time where you knew what the right thing to do was but you decided to confer with your colleagues first and 2) Tell me a time where you broke the rules. ??? Even one the other managers looked at the manager asking that question and shook her head as if she knew it was sort of a trick question. She wasn't really in agreement that the question should be asked.

    As a new grad, I definitely suggest new grads to write down all the difficult situations you were involved with during nursing school, what happened and the result. I feel like the farther I get out from nursing school, the more I forget the finer details of those kinds of situations. Then, bring that paper with you to the interview so you have something to reference instead of freezing in your seat, becoming increasingly tachycardic and diaphoretic like I did. I had to work PM shift right after the interview. I got changed into my scrubs and proceeded to break down at the nurse's station. Not a good feeling. I was so angry and disappointed with myself.

    I was prepared to answer questions like why I got into nursing, how I handled caring for a full team, my thoughts on the hospital's mission statement, how I value customer service and realize the importance of patient satisfaction and HCAHPS surveys, why I would be a good fit on that particular floor, my strengths/weaknesses...

    Ah wells, I blew that interview so now I will learn from that experience and hopefully, will do better on the next.
  8. 0
    TOUCHE ALISON!!!
  9. 2
    Quote from Larry77

    Can we please stop the discrimination topic? I would much rather this thread be about interviewing than about very personal issues like the one used as an example.
    You brought it up and if this is an example you use, it is something you think about. There are a lot of nurses, great nurses, great BECAUSE the have a special needs child and you want to blow them off as "high maintenance"??? That's why intermittent FMLA is in place. It's a good thing we don't know where this new hospital is. I would tell people to RUN. I bet Workers Comp is a four letter word to you, too. And getting pregnant. They would have those little brats to take care of.
    monkeybug and SoldierNurse22 like this.
  10. 0
    I just want to say that I know I'm a terrible interview. I don't handle hypothetical situations well at all. Even when I take acls classes, 'faking' a situation doesn't work for me.

    Even the interview I had last, the manager tried to get me to relax and I still had the sweaty palms.

    It's very hard to be an interviewer. Tough to gauge what you think the person wants to hear. When I thought an interview went well (it was all about pt satisfaction and no nursing) I never got called.

    My last interview, I was given feedback and I really appreciated it. I was told I came off quiet and reserved. Not true about me. But it just goes to show; and I hate wearing business casual clothes.

    I made a portfolio that included my résumé (longevity), perfect attendance awards, letters of thanks from coworkers and managers and letters from patients. I'm socially awkward but when I'm in my nursing uniform, it's like an alter-ego. Maybe my next interview should include a photo of my closet, which would show a majority of white nursing scrubs over normal clothes.


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