New to ER

  1. Hello all!

    I am an experienced med/surg nurse who will begin working next month in a busy ER (30,000+ patients yearly). I will be entering a preceptorship in my new job and in the meantime I have registered for some courses (Critical Care, Peds, Dysryhmias) to prepare myself. Any advice as I embark on this exciting new venture will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks -- Daniela
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   CHUBBY
    Originally posted by choquita:
    Hello all!

    I am an experienced med/surg nurse who will begin working next month in a busy ER (30,000+ patients yearly). I will be entering a preceptorship in my new job and in the meantime I have registered for some courses (Critical Care, Peds, Dysryhmias) to prepare myself. Any advice as I embark on this exciting new venture will be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks -- Daniela
    Good Luck...That's a decent volume. Hopefully, you'll get through all your preceptorship before you're "counted" as staff. Just soak in everything you can and don't be afraid to ask questions.


    [This message has been edited by chubby (edited September 06, 2000).]
  4. by   mom2almar
    I too am a new ER nurse. With 12 years in heme/onc I transferred to a level 2 trauma/ER in April. I also took the courses you mentioned and a 6 part critical care course. My orientation was good but not quite long enough, 5 weeks (24 hours/week.)Ask to extend your orientation if you dont feel ready to go on your own. I found the hardest parts were not knowing where anything was and in some cases not even knowing WHAT a doctor is asking for. The paperwork was also confusing at first. "The pink copy goes here, the yellow copy goes there, unless it needs to be dictated, then it goes overthere" HUH? I misplaced a few charts. But you have your med-surg skills and priority setting is the key. 6 monthes now and I'm still learning something new everyday and that's what I was looking for. Remember, everyone was new at one time.
  5. by   CEN35
    Danny (sorry I was always one to use nicknames for people)

    Everything you have been told is accurate, so far. Tryin to learn where everything is, tough usually. No matter how uptight you get just stop briefly and think rationally, that's the key. Everybody can be overwhelmed at some point. After 2 months, I thought I was ready and knew it all, after 6 months same, after 9 monthsame, etc etc. However, to be perfectly honest with ya? It took two years in the ER (Level II Trauma center, that se's now 40,000 a year), beofe nothing surprised me, and nothing got me rattled, or overwhelmed etc. The learning curve IMO was on a scale of 1-10, a 10 the 1st 6 months, an 8 the next 6 months, a 4 the next 6 months, and after 2 years a 1-2. So the 1st 12-18 months you may learn a lot. Of course, also know that I NEVER had experience of any type prior to ER (other than EMT training). I went form new grad to ER, and have done nothing else since. Good Luck Danny, and have any quesions? Email me and/or reply here.........

    Rick (CEN35)
  6. by   Tobash
    Welcome to Emergency nursing!! You are ahead of the game with your med-surg experience and are already planning by taking the additional classes. You should be an asset in your dept. As a clinical preceptor in a 60,000+pt/yr ED, I recommend that you establish learning objectives at the outset with your preceptor. This includes new technical skills (ie. defib/cardoversion/intubation/abg's etc.) and assessment skills not in your med/surg past (ie. trauma/peds/psych/ortho). Also if you are transferring within the same institution, make sure you bring your previous skill checklists. Unit specific policies and guidelines are your most important policies to focus on during your orientation. Recommended classes to attend during your first year: ACLS/PALS/ENPC/TNCC and Non-violent Crisis Intervention. I wish you much luck and rewards!........Tobash

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