new Rn as a preceptor?

  1. I'm a fairly new RN. I graduated in 2002, and started right out of school as a new Emergency Room RN. I precepted for a good 16 weeks, and have been on my own now for about a year and a half. Everyone whom I work with says that they feel like I have been an RN longer than that, my ANM's and Managers really like me and feel that I am a great asset to the team, and know what I'm doing. Recently, my managers have asked me to start precepting other new grads. I feel comfortable with myself as an RN, I know that I'm competent and know what I'm doing, but I dont have the 30 years of experience that other ER nurses do. I expressed this to my manager, but she says, "dont be critical of yourself" and really wants me to start precepting others. Am I being silly? Should i just accept this and start to precept others? Even though I've only had a year and a half experience, is this okay for me? This is an experience that I would LOVE to have, I just want to make sure I'm not doing the wrong thing in saying YES to this experience!
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   llg
    It might help you to remember that preceptors don't have to know everything and/or be exert at everything. Their primary role is to help somebody else learn things. That includes helping them to find the answers to their questions by looking it up, finding someone with more experience who can answer it, etc.

    Even those people who have 5,10, 30 years of experience don't know everything. We all have to ask for help/advice now and then. As a new preceptor, you will simply have to identify your resources and don't be afraid (or embarassed) to use them. Demonstrating to your orientee that everyone has to ask for help sometimes is a part of being a good role model and teacher.

    Good luck,
    llg
  4. by   camay1221_RN
    Your managers have given you a great compliment! I have worked with RN's who have been in the field for a long time, and I wouldn't want some of them precepting anyone! Apparently, your competency speaks volumes to those in power!

    If this is something you really want to do, then I say, "Go for it!"


    Quote from newfloridaRN
    I'm a fairly new RN. I graduated in 2002, and started right out of school as a new Emergency Room RN. I precepted for a good 16 weeks, and have been on my own now for about a year and a half. Everyone whom I work with says that they feel like I have been an RN longer than that, my ANM's and Managers really like me and feel that I am a great asset to the team, and know what I'm doing. Recently, my managers have asked me to start precepting other new grads. I feel comfortable with myself as an RN, I know that I'm competent and know what I'm doing, but I dont have the 30 years of experience that other ER nurses do. I expressed this to my manager, but she says, "dont be critical of yourself" and really wants me to start precepting others. Am I being silly? Should i just accept this and start to precept others? Even though I've only had a year and a half experience, is this okay for me? This is an experience that I would LOVE to have, I just want to make sure I'm not doing the wrong thing in saying YES to this experience!
  5. by   maddiecat
    Absolutely! Remember, that the best way to get really good at something is to teach it someone else. You might be surprised at what good it will do you too. Best of luck.
  6. by   MandyInMS
    Apparently they have faith in you and your capabilties like the others have said..NOBODY , no matter how long they have been in nursing, knows EVERYTHING..no one expects you to..I'm sure they picked you because they see you as having great 'people skills' , patience, and ability...go for it ...best wishes (((hugzzz)))
  7. by   ang75
    My vote, snatch up the chance. This is a great compliment for you. Other than being able to put it on your resume, you get answer tons and tons of questions.:chuckle Just sort of kidding. There are tons of questions, but we can all use review on lessons learned long ago, right? You will do a fabulous job I am sure. Your boss seems to feel so as well. Do it. Good luck.
  8. by   MaleAPRN
    Say yes!!!

    Consider this an honor! They (your peers) obviously see the talents that you have as an ER nurse.

    I became a preceptor after 1 yr of being in the ER. I even became the interim educator at one time (for 6-7 months)! Most of the nurses there at the time were there for many, many years...and they asked me! It's because I showed initiative and I was a quick learner. Most importantly, I knew to ask questions when I'm not sure. It's the cocky ones that think they know it all that mostly get in trouble.

    DO IT! DO IT! JUST DO IT! :hatparty:

    Good luck.

    Vinny
  9. by   zambezi
    Its funny you should bring this up...I am in the same situation...new grad in critical care in 2002...about six months ago, I started precepting travelers to the unit...then our ICU nurses to our unit (CCU...when ICU nurses precept there, it is just a short one or two day orientation to our unit in case they float). Now our CNS has asked if I would be willing to help train the next set of new grads...Like you, I feel pretty confident in myself, I know what I am doing, etc but don't have all of those years of clinical experience! I think that I want to start out just "filling in"...our new grads get at least two months on nights (after a little more than amonth on days)...I don't know if I would want a new grad for the entire two months at this point...but I love to teach, I feel that it makes me a better nurse becuase I have to explain and think about what I do...Anyway, not much to add but I just wanted you to know there is someone else in the same situation! I am also interested in what others have to say...
  10. by   SWFlorida
    Not all nurses have the patience or interest to teach. Its good to pair new grads up with someone they can relate too also. Its a great combination. You may want to inquire whether you get added pay for this. I've worked at hospital in the past who give you a few dollars more per hour for actual time that you are precepting another nurse. There is a lot of added responsibility and paperwork involved. You deserve to be compensated for this.
  11. by   veetach
    what a great compliment!! One suggestion that I have is, to evaluate your knowledge base, and your understanding of hospital policies and procedures , and if you are informed enough to act as a teacher and a resource, then go for it!

    I know from experience that a preceptor is going to be expected to know all..... and if something happens while you are orienting a new employee, then it will all fall onto your shoulders.

    We have an RN in our dept who totally believes she knows more than anyone else, and has been given the duty of a preceptor. She has been out of school x 3 years, and is a good nurse, but the older more experienced RN's do not think she is experienced enough to be a preceptor.....

    She has been overheard misinforming her orientees on different things, and believe me, some people will not let her forget it...

    Good luck to you, though.
  12. by   suzanne4
    yes!

    just do it...........

    you should feel proud that they asked..........
  13. by   Tweety
    Agree that it's a compliment to you that you are a preceptor. Being a preceptor is about a lot of things, not just clinical skills and years of experience. Obviously you have a lot to offer. Go for it and enjoy!
  14. by   purplemania
    Your conscientousness shows what a good preceptor you can be. Remember that novice nurses don't need a preceptor with tons of experience, because they are learning the basics. Also, as preceptor you should be able to include other nurses as resources for your orientee ("I have asked Joe to work with you today regarding sterile dressings"). I hope your education dept. provides preceptor training.

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