new Rn as a preceptor? - page 2

I'm a fairly new RN. I graduated in 2002, and started right out of school as a new Emergency Room RN. I precepted for a good 16 weeks, and have been on my own now for about a year and a half. ... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    Quote from newfloridaRN
    I'm a fairly new RN. I graduated in 2002, and started right out of school as a new Emergency Room RN. I precepted for a good 16 weeks, and have been on my own now for about a year and a half. Everyone whom I work with says that they feel like I have been an RN longer than that, my ANM's and Managers really like me and feel that I am a great asset to the team, and know what I'm doing. Recently, my managers have asked me to start precepting other new grads. I feel comfortable with myself as an RN, I know that I'm competent and know what I'm doing, but I dont have the 30 years of experience that other ER nurses do. I expressed this to my manager, but she says, "dont be critical of yourself" and really wants me to start precepting others. Am I being silly? Should i just accept this and start to precept others? Even though I've only had a year and a half experience, is this okay for me? This is an experience that I would LOVE to have, I just want to make sure I'm not doing the wrong thing in saying YES to this experience!
    Dont be hard on yourself
    Personally, as a nurse for over a quarter of a century and as a former orderlie and as a former Corpsman. I have absolutely no interest in being a preceptor or a mentor. There are additional meetings you have to go to, weekly performance reports and all sorts of crappy paperwork. So no I wont do precepting, or as they call them here "Clinical Guides" Now that is a stupid name for a preceptor.
    So be glad that they place so much confidence in you, and get ready for additional paperwork and meetings.
    I would rather be on the golf course

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