Medicaid. Is it being abused? - page 24

Medicaid was a great idea when first introduced to assure that even the very poor could get quality health care. I just wonder when I see someone drive up in a newer car come up to the triage desk... Read More

  1. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from LeahJet
    I think that just about anyone here that half way keeps up on this BB knows about your extensive expertise in the research, administration, and investigative aspects of nursing and healthcare in the 70's and 80's. You have accomplished a lot and you are proud...and rightfully so.
    Just as most of us aren't privy to all the facts and research that you have been exposed to for so many years, I think it may be fair to say that maybe you may have limited exposure in "the trenches". As someone else pointed out earlier.... SO many ER (and other) nurses can't all be wrong. While we may not have the facts, figures, and graphs sitting in front of us on a desk, I am pretty sure we have a grasp on what is going on out there. Just like the age old gripe that nurses have with administration.....
    It looks good on paper, but it ain't workin'.
    Hate to tell you this but I worked in the trenches just like everyone else did, even when I was in administration. I worked staff relief at P & S, NYC. And in the 80s, I also worked in staff relief during season, here in Florida. So please don't make the comment about administration. And one can limit ones education and the journals one reads if one wants. I've had a very busy and active life, tied up with work education and raising my daughter. I read when ever I can find the time, on the bus, in bed, eating a meal, waiting in a physician's office, waiting in a client's employer's office, by the pool, at the beach,even in the bathroom. My daughter has commented that I will die with either a book or journal in my hand. I sure hope so.

    Grannynurse
  2. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from LeahJet
    I think that just about anyone here that half way keeps up on this BB knows about your extensive expertise in the research, administration, and investigative aspects of nursing and healthcare in the 70's and 80's. You have accomplished a lot and you are proud...and rightfully so.
    Just as most of us aren't privy to all the facts and research that you have been exposed to for so many years, I think it may be fair to say that maybe you may have limited exposure in "the trenches". As someone else pointed out earlier.... SO many ER (and other) nurses can't all be wrong. While we may not have the facts, figures, and graphs sitting in front of us on a desk, I am pretty sure we have a grasp on what is going on out there. Just like the age old gripe that nurses have with administration.....
    It looks good on paper, but it ain't workin'.

    By the way (and this is not meant as a put down) but you failed to mention I have worked in more then 15 years. And that my experience is hopelessly outdated, unless you count all my ER visits, conversations with nursing staff and my own personal obersvations. But then again, some think they count for nothing because they have been observed from the patient's prespective. And we all know how distorted patients views are, just look at their unreasonable ER demands.

    Night

    Grannynurse
  3. by   LeahJet
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    Hate to tell you this but I worked in the trenches just like everyone else did, even when I was in administration. I worked staff relief at P & S, NYC. And in the 80s, I also worked in staff relief during season, here in Florida. So please don't make the comment about administration. And one can limit ones education and the journals one reads if one wants. I've had a very busy and active life, tied up with work education and raising my daughter. I read when ever I can find the time, on the bus, in bed, eating a meal, waiting in a physician's office, waiting in a client's employer's office, by the pool, at the beach,even in the bathroom. My daughter has commented that I will die with either a book or journal in my hand. I sure hope so.

    Grannynurse
    First and foremost, I can and will make comments about administration. Anyone that has worked in the past 10 years knows how administration can be. Do you not take into account any of the posters here and cases of injust treatment by the powers that be? Again, do we all have an incorrect comprehension of what we see every day? We do not get all of our info from journals....we live it. Which, by the way, I tend to be a pretty well read person myself. Maybe "one" can have an all or none attitude...assuming that one does not read and keep well informed or educated because one actually works at bedside. For one so openminded and enlightened, there seems to be a lot of assuming and judging going on. But wait, I'm not on Medicaid....so I am not exempt from judgement.

    As a previous poster stated....opinions will not change. I have read with an open mind and I truly do see points on both sides. Has my opinion changed? No.
    Again, it never ceases to amaze me how some of the most liberal can pass judgement themselves and it is viewed as acceptable as long it is beneficial to their own cause.
    Last edit by LeahJet on Jan 12, '06
  4. by   LeahJet
    I think I will respectfully withdraw from this "debate". I respect the opinions of both sides of this issue but as I said, my opinion will not change.
    It is frustrating and diminishing to go around and around when the end result will be the same.
    Grannynurse, I am sure you are a nice person as well as informed. Differences are what makes this world an interesting place.
  5. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from LeahJet
    I think I will respectfully withdraw from this "debate". I respect the opinions of both sides of this issue but as I said, my opinion will not change.
    It is frustrating and diminishing to go around and around when the end result will be the same.
    Grannynurse, I am sure you are a nice person as well as informed. Differences are what makes this world an interesting place.
    Likewise I am sure you are as well. I tend to view my world in this manner. Is a glass with half water, half full or half empty? For me, it is generally half full. I went thru my half empty stage, back after my accident, for a few years

    Grannynurse
  6. by   sgckatibug4
    I know that's right. When I'm out and see someone with a big brand new SUV I think to myself they're in so much debt I'm glad I'm not in their shoes. I try to tell my son who is 9 that bigger and better is not always the best. What will they do if they have an accident that impairs them from working? They will lose it all.
  7. by   Sara, RN
    The real injustice of our medicaid system is that its original intention is not the current use. Anyone in the ED sees repeated misuse of our department...I don't have time to wait in the urgent care for the 2 week h/o sore throat; I want an U/S now, a young female who presents with 2 wk h/o abdominal pain; I don't have the money to get the amoxicillin or the tylenol for my 2 yo. Yes, these people have fake nails, $700.00 tatoos, smoke, designer clothes, etc. I wonder when "the system" became someones right, abused for generations???
    I have no problem helping someone for a while to better their life/circumstances. I also believe that it is NEVER good to let your mind and body be idle, therefore, any job is OK and gives a sense of worth and responsibility.
    What needs to happen is people need to be educated on choices. You can have a baby, you can get some money, you can go to school, you can work at the grocery store, but it is YOUR responsibility and the help is for a limited time only!
    On my less tolerant days, I think the depo shot should be given prior to the money given, but then how do you control all those boys???
  8. by   teeituptom
    Look at it from the other way. If it wasnt for medicaid then the MDs and hospitals would be getting absolutely nothing for all the care we give people on medicaid.
  9. by   lindarn
    Quote from SWFlorida
    How about the young teenage girls who end up pregnant. Its almost an automatic qualification for full medicaid insurance, housing and food stamps. This can go on for generations.

    Perhaps the government should tax those who have children out of wedlock as a burden to society. This may encourage teens to practice birth control. Those who are able to care for their children could receive a tax break if they show they have proper insurance, a home, and a full time job.

    Is the system geared for the achievers or the irresponsible?
    This IS going on for generations. That is where the term, "generational welfare", comes from. My 12 year old daughter just told me that a girl in her class, (7th grade- middle school), is pregnant, doesn't know who the father is (she thinks that is a HS boy). She has told me that the girl's mom is an alcoholic, (parents are divorced), and the girl steals booze from the bottles when her mom is not home. She also told me that this girl fills up a water bottle with booze, and takes it to school with her. I feel terrible for this girl, and that she was a perfect set up for this to happen by her family dysfunction/dynamics. I am torn between keeping my mouth shut about this (as my daughter wants me to), telling a school counselor, and/or calling CPS, and making a complaint. Anyone with thoughts on this subject? I hate being a rat, but I also hate knowing what this girl is being set up for in life, through no fault of her own. I am open to suggestion.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  10. by   JeanettePNP
    Quote from lindarn
    This IS going on for generations. That is where the term, "generational welfare", comes from. My 12 year old daughter just told me that a girl in her class, (7th grade- middle school), is pregnant, doesn't know who the father is (she thinks that is a HS boy). She has told me that the girl's mom is an alcoholic, (parents are divorced), and the girl steals booze from the bottles when her mom is not home. She also told me that this girl fills up a water bottle with booze, and takes it to school with her. I feel terrible for this girl, and that she was a perfect set up for this to happen by her family dysfunction/dynamics. I am torn between keeping my mouth shut about this (as my daughter wants me to), telling a school counselor, and/or calling CPS, and making a complaint. Anyone with thoughts on this subject? I hate being a rat, but I also hate knowing what this girl is being set up for in life, through no fault of her own. I am open to suggestion.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    Of course you should get involved! You are not being a "rat". Isn't this what we always teach our children - if someone is in trouble you must tell another adult who can help?
  11. by   HisTreasure
    Quote from lindarn
    This IS going on for generations. That is where the term, "generational welfare", comes from. My 12 year old daughter just told me that a girl in her class, (7th grade- middle school), is pregnant, doesn't know who the father is (she thinks that is a HS boy). She has told me that the girl's mom is an alcoholic, (parents are divorced), and the girl steals booze from the bottles when her mom is not home. She also told me that this girl fills up a water bottle with booze, and takes it to school with her. I feel terrible for this girl, and that she was a perfect set up for this to happen by her family dysfunction/dynamics. I am torn between keeping my mouth shut about this (as my daughter wants me to), telling a school counselor, and/or calling CPS, and making a complaint. Anyone with thoughts on this subject? I hate being a rat, but I also hate knowing what this girl is being set up for in life, through no fault of her own. I am open to suggestion.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    It is such a sad story but unfortunately it is not uncommon. At least around here. While you may feel obligated to get someone to intervene, and rightly so, the truth is that this young lady's life has already taken quite a disappointing turn. From here in her life can only have a few options, none of which are especially promising. At least here, with some of the outreach teens I have worked with in the past, these children are placed in young mother programs or foster care. The young mothers programs get them set up in a boarding house. They get school and mothering instruction which is ideal. But then, they are set up in their own apartments on welfare and PCAP. This is to help them get on their feet, but it doesn't work that way. They have their babies at home for however long the state allows and then they must enroll in a work experience program for 30 hours a week. They receive vouchers to put their children in child care while attending the WEP. They aren't paid, they remain on assistance. They get one day a week to look for a job, but in the meantime the are getting child care assistance. If they find a job and they make too much, they lose their assistance or have to pay too much out of pocket for childcare. They are forced to either re-enroll in public assistance (after quitting their job or losing it on purpose) or they have to work two jobs and they have no time to attend classes to better their lives or spend much needed time with their children. Some remain working for the small cash stipend they get from public assistance until their case is closed. Then what?

    Those in the foster care system often get lost. There are the success stories, but I have worked with far more girls with negative outcomes rather than positive. My experience with the foster care system is limited, so I won't comment much on this and leave myself open to much critism in that respect. I do know of three young ladies who were at the outreach center who where products of CPS intervention due to their young motherhood. Two ended up back home with their mothers, who were not fit to raise their own children, much less their grands. One was still with her foster family and her baby was thriving. Her case was exceptional because her foster mother allowed her to stay even after she turned eighteen. That can't be said for all situations.

    I believe you have every right to report it to someone to at least investigate the situation. I just know that there aren't a plethera of happy endings.
  12. by   TheCommuter
    Yes, I think many people are abusing Medicaid.
  13. by   teeituptom
    Are they abusing it
    Or are politicians of both sides using it to buy votes

    Im no Judas with my vote for sale at 30 pieces of silver

    gold maybe

    golf certainly

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