LOC or ABC first? - pg.3 | allnurses

LOC or ABC first? - page 3

I feel like this is a silly question, but it is a topic that recently came up in class (I am just about to finish nursing school), and it is driving me off-the-wall CRAZY! We all know that our... Read More

  1. Visit  Pets to People profile page
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    [QUOTE=FlyingScot;7199119]Except to the person you start chest compressions on who was really just asleep.

    QUOTE]

    This wouldn't happen unless you skipped C and so didn't check the persons pulse before starting chest compressions :/ It would be pretty important to make sure their heart isn't actually beating before you start pumping on their chest lol
  2. Visit  Pets to People profile page
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    Quote from cardiacrocks
    You always have your rare situations as well. When someone is hypoglycemic/hyperglycemic, they can lose consciousness and if it's too low you won't be able to wake them. So, in that situation you need to assess their breath, etc. then check BS, you are most likely not going to start chest compression's on this person, just saying. Anyway, I know this is off topic. Basically, when you are taking the NCLEX you need to think like a nurse not an EMT.
    You completely skipped over PULSE/HEART BEAT. If they are breathing you do not then check their BS lol aka BG, you check thier pulse! You know, ABC, not AB then BG. If you check their ABC and they are within normal range and they are unconcious then you could check BG.

    If a pt is unconcious, for whatever reason, and they are completely unresponsive, you check airway, then breathing THEN pulse. You give them only rescue breaths if they have a heart beat but no respiration and rescue breaths and chest compressions if they have no resp and no beat.
  3. Visit  Pets to People profile page
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    Yes, yes I know, I still haven't gotten in the habit of the CAB, my bad.

    And I just realized, it is LOC first! If you see someone unconcious you don't just walk up and lay your head on their chest or put your hand under their nose to check for pulse and respirations. It's "hey are you ok?!", give a little shake, no response then sternal rub then CAB. Of course this all happens in a matter of seconds but it's still LOC first.
  4. Visit  virushunter profile page
    0
    In my experience, ABC is always first but LIC simultaneously tues into that. If a person can't breath or isn't profuse ing, you will immediately notice the alteration I their LOC. if you can't breath, you can't think or speak. You will get an initial feel for their LOC but it may change depending on how quickly and successfully you address their ABC
  5. Visit  cardiacrocks profile page
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    Quote from Pets to People
    You completely skipped over PULSE/HEART BEAT. If they are breathing you do not then check their BS lol aka BG, you check thier pulse! You know, ABC, not AB then BG. If you check their ABC and they are within normal range and they are unconcious then you could check BG.

    If a pt is unconcious, for whatever reason, and they are completely unresponsive, you check airway, then breathing THEN pulse. You give them only rescue breaths if they have a heart beat but no respiration and rescue breaths and chest compressions if they have no resp and no beat.
    Yea, I know that, hence the fact that I put RARE situation. I know all about the ABC's. Gesh, I am a Registered Nurse not an idiot, gesh.
  6. Visit  FlyingScot profile page
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    [QUOTE=Pets to People;7201806]
    Quote from FlyingScot
    Except to the person you start chest compressions on who was really just asleep.

    QUOTE]

    This wouldn't happen unless you skipped C and so didn't check the persons pulse before starting chest compressions :/ It would be pretty important to make sure their heart isn't actually beating before you start pumping on their chest lol
    Really?!! I didn't know that.
  7. Visit  brithoover profile page
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    If a patient is symptomatic with a HR of less than 60 it is appropriate to start chest compressions. Thought I'd throw that one in there
  8. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
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    Quote from brithoover
    If a patient is symptomatic with a HR of less than 60 it is appropriate to start chest compressions. Thought I'd throw that one in there
    Only with peds, not with adults.

    Only pulseless adults get compressions. Symptomatic bradycardia gets you an ambulance ride, external pacer pads, and probably some atropine...

    PALS vs ACLS
    turnforthenurseRN likes this.
  9. Visit  brithoover profile page
    0
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Only with peds, not with adults.

    Only pulseless adults get compressions. Symptomatic bradycardia gets you an ambulance ride, external pacer pads, and probably some atropine...

    PALS vs ACLS
    Oh yeah I have peds only brain..sorry bout that!
  10. Visit  Suburban.Raider.11 profile page
    0
    I'm a newly licensed AEMT and ABC is always first, in any situation. LOC can be determined while you're assessing airway. breathing, and circulation. Typically you are speaking to your patient, so their level of consciousness quickly becomes apparent.
  11. Visit  mish_RN profile page
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    I assess LOC while doing my ABC. That's what I have learned, and it works faster in emergent situations.
  12. Visit  SweetMelissaRN profile page
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    Quote from brithoover
    If a patient is symptomatic with a HR of less than 60 it is appropriate to start chest compressions. Thought I'd throw that one in there
    I'm pretty sure that's only on infants. Even if a person is symptomatic and has a heartbeat of 30, you don't start compressions unless they are pulse less, at least with adults.
  13. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    0
    Quote from SweetMelissaRN
    I'm pretty sure that's only on infants. Even if a person is symptomatic and has a heartbeat of 30, you don't start compressions unless they are pulse less, at least with adults.
    It's for peds in general, not just infants... check out PALS.

    The only adults who get compressions are those without a pulse.


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