I;m New and I have a question.

  1. :spin: Hello... I'm new to this site and I have a question. I'm 15 weeks pregnant and I have a problem with being assigned to triage. You never know who is going to walk through you door with what. I don't want to put my baby at risk, nor do I want to inconvenience my co-workers, because there are very few that enjoy the triage assignment. Does anyone know of any articles or research that has been done on this situation? Any input is appreciated. Thanks!!
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   nurseangel47
    Welcome to allnurses. Good luck with the baby. No pat advice here but maybe someone else could refer you to the information you need.
  4. by   pinoyRN_23
    im also a newbie here...just took my nclex-rn exam and luckily passed on my first take...thinkin of pursuin my career in this area...still not that confident though...can anyone tell me how much do they usually pay entry level nurses on the ER dept?

    thanks!
  5. by   TazziRN
    Triage is usually the safest place for a pregnant nurse because there is no heavy work. At my last facility all the pregnant ER nurses were assigned to triage during the last trimester, if not before. The one single thing you can do to protect yourself is wash your hands, you know that.
  6. by   NurseCard
    I don't really know what advice to give you, but I do feel for you. Right now as we speak, I'm working a shift on a unit of my psychiatric hospital, reserved for the most violent (or tendency to be violent) patients. I refuse to refuse the assignment because I feel like it isn't fair, and also because, for the most part, I am behind a VERY strong glass barrier most of the night. Plus, these patients actually mostly sleep.
  7. by   traumaRUs
    You still have the "anything can come through the door" feeling in the back in the ER too. I would offer up the frequent hand-washing part too.
  8. by   chip193
    Triage is where all the Moms to be want to be put in my place. No lifting. Triage is done from a chair (which you'll appreciate as you put on weight as the baby grows).

    Good luck!
  9. by   RunnerRN
    I would prefer triage if I were you. If you're really nervous about some people, make a deal with your coworkers that you'll triage all the kids (if possible) and they'll do the psychs. I would do that for my coworker
  10. by   VegRN
    I am not really sure what you are worried about. Triage sounds like it would be a preferable assignment as other posters indicated.
    I know of an LPN that refused to go into an isolation room (MRSA) because she was pregnant. I think this is ridiculous and I can't imagine it's based on any type of research.
    I highly respect the above poster that said she refuses to refuse an assignment in her psych ward. If you signed up for the job, you should do it unless there is evidence that it would actually harm the baby.
  11. by   Altra
    Quote from ERNURSE02
    :spin: Hello... I'm new to this site and I have a question. I'm 15 weeks pregnant and I have a problem with being assigned to triage. You never know who is going to walk through you door with what. I don't want to put my baby at risk, nor do I want to inconvenience my co-workers, because there are very few that enjoy the triage assignment. Does anyone know of any articles or research that has been done on this situation? Any input is appreciated. Thanks!!
    How would you avoid the "who is going to walk through the door with what" if you were in the back, not assigned to triage? It's the nature of the ER.

    Wash your hands, wear gloves when appropriate to look at a wound or whenever else you think it's necessary, and try to avoid being coughed on. You'd do these things anyway.

    Our pregnant co-workers appreciate triage because it gives them a chance to sit down.
  12. by   scribblerpnp
    I think the OP may be worried about possible illnesses she may encounter through triage that would be bad for the baby. These are people with illnesses which have yet to be diagnosed. There is a possibility that the OP may come in contact with some bad stuff. For example getting chicken pox in the first part of pregnancy can result in congenital varicella syndrome. This condition is can result in birth defects, including skin scarring, malformed limbs, an abnormally small head, vision or hearing problems, and motor or mental developmental disabilities. There are some other communicable diseases that can really harm a fetus as well. But if your vaccines are up-to-date and the titers are ok, I would think the risk is minimal.

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