How to prepare b4 orientation for new grad rn position

  1. 0
    Hello group. I graduated 5/2012. I will be starting a new grad er position in about a month. I havent touched a book since i passed nclex in July. What should i do to prepare for new position? should i pick up my med surg book, pharm book. I purchased an ER Study book. What did you guys do to prepare?

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  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 1
    I would start by refreshing on a head to toe assessment and get ready to run, you will learn more in 6 months then you did in all of nursing school.
    EDdude likes this.
  4. 1
    Congrats on the job!! I'm a new grad RN about 10 weeks into my orientation in a very busy Level 1 Trauma Center. I would recommend reviewing your head to toe assessment and going over steps for skills (IV starts, NG tube placement etc). I would also recommend listening to EM Basic podcast, you can find it on iTunes or google it and I think you can listen to it on his page. It's made for Med students/Residents but there is so much great info on commonly seen issues in the ED and you'll get great tips for your assessment and it'll give you an idea of what tests/labs to expect. I've learned a ton of great info from this podcast.

    Starting in the ED as a new grad can be the coolest, scariest, most awesome and overwhelming thing ever. I've seen and done and learned so much since I've started and know I still haven't scratched the surface. The one thing that every single nurse I work with has told me is don't be afraid to ask questions, they all say they're afraid of the newbie that thinks they know it all and doesn't ask for help. Good luck and enjoy the ride.
    Cahoon BSN RN likes this.
  5. 0
    Thanks for the info
    Quote from prep8611
    I would start by refreshing on a head to toe assessment and get ready to run, you will learn more in 6 months then you did in all of nursing school.
  6. 0
    Thank you. I just downloaded about 10 lectures, I will listen on my drive to work. I never knew this existed. I pose another question for you since you are a new grad. My current job is a sitdown job, non stressful, I have been there for 13 years since i graduated with my BBA, do u think I can handle juggling both fulltime job, the reason being is because sometime in May, my company will offer me(coworkers) a buyout package to voluntarily leave, if I quit in Feb i will get nothing.
    Quote from EDdude
    Congrats on the job!! I'm a new grad RN about 10 weeks into my orientation in a very busy Level 1 Trauma Center. I would recommend reviewing your head to toe assessment and going over steps for skills (IV starts, NG tube placement etc). I would also recommend listening to EM Basic podcast, you can find it on iTunes or google it and I think you can listen to it on his page. It's made for Med students/Residents but there is so much great info on commonly seen issues in the ED and you'll get great tips for your assessment and it'll give you an idea of what tests/labs to expect. I've learned a ton of great info from this podcast.

    Starting in the ED as a new grad can be the coolest, scariest, most awesome and overwhelming thing ever. I've seen and done and learned so much since I've started and know I still haven't scratched the surface. The one thing that every single nurse I work with has told me is don't be afraid to ask questions, they all say they're afraid of the newbie that thinks they know it all and doesn't ask for help. Good luck and enjoy the ride.
  7. 0
    I am a Director over two ED's and Adult Critical Care. I have seen many new grads come into my ED's and my first piece of advise is to prepare yourself mentally. My background is Critical Care, but once the ED's fell under my direct oversight, I quickly developed a new found appreciation for ED nurses. I would go into your new position as a blank sheet of paper and a dry sponge. Ask lots of questions and place yourself in the hands of the experienced RN's. They have a wealth of knowledge to share and you only have to ask and they will do everything possible to mentor and coach you. We don't expect you to know everything in 6 months. Actively seek out your mentors. The most important piece of advise I can offer is ask yourself "why". Whenever you're performing a procedure or giving a medication, ask yourself why you're doing it. If you don't know the reason, ask.
    Good luck.
  8. 0
    Thank you for responding. I definitely will be a sponge and always rewmember to ask why?
    Quote from Holygrail
    I am a Director over two ED's and Adult Critical Care. I have seen many new grads come into my ED's and my first piece of advise is to prepare yourself mentally. My background is Critical Care, but once the ED's fell under my direct oversight, I quickly developed a new found appreciation for ED nurses. I would go into your new position as a blank sheet of paper and a dry sponge. Ask lots of questions and place yourself in the hands of the experienced RN's. They have a wealth of knowledge to share and you only have to ask and they will do everything possible to mentor and coach you. We don't expect you to know everything in 6 months. Actively seek out your mentors. The most important piece of advise I can offer is ask yourself "why". Whenever you're performing a procedure or giving a medication, ask yourself why you're doing it. If you don't know the reason, ask.
    Good luck.
  9. 0
    12 weeks on the tele unit


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