How do you get patients to give you a "very good?" - page 3

It seems like no matter how hard we try, our percentage of "very good" responses continue to drop. How do you get the patients to mark very good as opposed to "good" on the survey they get in the... Read More

  1. by   CCU NRS
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I just ran across this cartoon that describes the situation to a tee!

    http://www.nurstoon.com/comic118.html


    very funny
  2. by   teeituptom
    That was cute
  3. by   sbic56
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I once worked at a hospital where staffing and pt care were horrible. However, staff had it drilled into their heads to be super polite and suck up to pts.
    These staff always got high "customer satisfaction" ratings. Most pts don't know the difference between excellent nursing care or a lousy nurse who is extra polite.
    I hear you, but remember, patients don't know what we know, so they aren't really aware what we may not be doing for them medically. What they do know is when someone treats them well. It's just as easy to be nice as not and being kind is every bit as important as giving great care in their minds.
  4. by   fiestynurse
    Quote from mtnmom
    however, I know of at least one nurse on my unit who has been heard telling patients, "are you happy with the care you have gotten...here is how you spell my name..." Sad but true.

    Guess who has tons of patient positive comments in her file and who doesn't?

    -
    I say GOOD FOR HER!!!

    I have also heard nurses tell patients to write that the hospitals - need more nurses - the nurses are over-worked - the nurse-patient ratio is too high
  5. by   RNin92
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    I once worked at a hospital where staffing and pt care were horrible. However, staff had it drilled into their heads to be super polite and suck up to pts.
    These staff always got high "customer satisfaction" ratings. Most pts don't know the difference between excellent nursing care or a lousy nurse who is extra polite.
    I totally agree...and the cartoon was pretty darn cute (if not just a little too real!). :angryfire

    However, I've never been "very good" at suck-up...so I better stick with my skills!!!!
  6. by   berry
    Again, with the damn lidocaine and IV starts get over. I just keep laughing ever time I read something about it(I tried it once starting one in somebody's foot could not find my vein again then blew it stuck the other foot no lidocaine and got it). We give out a pre addressed/pre stamped survey with each discharge I always write, rn my name, the md, and his name. I have received many positive and negative responses. I do not really care one way or the other as I tell my boss if the good = the bad we can call it even. The best thank you can every get is that family member or patient coming back, grabbing you with a big bear hug, and thanking you because they or a son or daughter is still alive. Most ER docs and nurses are hard asses we see the dregs of society all day long every day and maybe I was getting a little sick of the moronic complaints clogging up the waiting room the n/v abd pain screaming for food as soon as you put them in the bed and so on. The other nigh at the end of a long 16 hour day we saved a guy pulled him back from being gone just talking with son while waiting to get him up to a unit made up for all the stupid crap I had dealt with for the last three shifts. The son's gratitude meant more than any excellent check on a form could and he was the kind of person who would have tossed it out anyway.
  7. by   teeituptom
    Its sad that some nurses feel that need to do so
  8. by   MrsWampthang
    Quote from Trauma_Mama
    The nurses who get the "Very Good" ratings are the ones who care enough to take the initiative to keep their skills current; and who care enough about the patient's comfort to inconvenience themselves, for instance by administering lidocaine before starting their IV's.

    To quote a nurse who complains that she only gets "good" ratings: "Why take the time? Maybe it is because like I said, I never used it as a medic, was never taught it as a nurse so have never used it and never will." I just don't see the need."

    This "I really don't give a rats *ss." Attitude is very clear to the patient!
    One example of why there are several threads dealing with people attitudes on this board.

    I posted asking for suggestions for the surveys that our ER is getting from all the patients that return surveys, not just the ones that I take care of. SHEEEEESH!

    Pam
  9. by   CCU NRS
    Quote from berry
    Again, with the damn lidocaine and IV starts get over. I just keep laughing ever time I read something about it(I tried it once starting one in somebody's foot could not find my vein again then blew it stuck the other foot no lidocaine and got it). We give out a pre addressed/pre stamped survey with each discharge I always write, rn my name, the md, and his name. I have received many positive and negative responses. I do not really care one way or the other as I tell my boss if the good = the bad we can call it even. The best thank you can every get is that family member or patient coming back, grabbing you with a big bear hug, and thanking you because they or a son or daughter is still alive. Most ER docs and nurses are hard asses we see the dregs of society all day long every day and maybe I was getting a little sick of the moronic complaints clogging up the waiting room the n/v abd pain screaming for food as soon as you put them in the bed and so on. The other nigh at the end of a long 16 hour day we saved a guy pulled him back from being gone just talking with son while waiting to get him up to a unit made up for all the stupid crap I had dealt with for the last three shifts. The son's gratitude meant more than any excellent check on a form could and he was the kind of person who would have tossed it out anyway.
    I mean IV starts are not really that painful it is a big stick that hurts for about a minute, people need to feel that pain to understand the importance of protecting the site and to keep from havning to get a replacement if they pull them out.
  10. by   laurakc
    Ok, this is what we were told.
    We were told to rehearse.
    Look at the questions. It does not say, "did the nurse abuse or hurt you"?
    It's like..was the nurse concerned with your privacy...so you say, Let me close the door and provide you with some privacy...did the nurse introduce herself..so you say, Hi, I am ..., I will be the nurse "caring" for you today..(don't say taking care..on our survey it says did the nurse care about ....)and you must be or are ...
    Just read the survey, rehearse the answers, and then, when you rehearse it enough, you will be able to "cue your patients to answer it correctly..
    Now, we do have patients that no one can ever satisfy..
    But, you have still provided privacy, introduced yourself by name, etc. and they really can't deny that..then, overall care will probably not be so good, but..
    Anyway, this is actually a trick, but when trials have been performed on live people, it actually worked...
    Now, to get people to remember your name and mention you, you have to be extremely nice, nonjudgemental, and go way out of your way...check on them frequently, look in on them and say goodbye, etc. (and candy and gum work well as bribes as well) You have to take the time to get to know what they really would like..and give it to them if possible..sometimes all they want is a smiling face..but not very often..
    Good luck
  11. by   MrsWampthang
    Quote from laurakc
    Ok, this is what we were told.
    We were told to rehearse.
    Look at the questions. It does not say, "did the nurse abuse or hurt you"?
    It's like..was the nurse concerned with your privacy...so you say, Let me close the door and provide you with some privacy...did the nurse introduce herself..so you say, Hi, I am ..., I will be the nurse "caring" for you today..(don't say taking care..on our survey it says did the nurse care about ....)and you must be or are ...
    Just read the survey, rehearse the answers, and then, when you rehearse it enough, you will be able to "cue your patients to answer it correctly..
    Now, we do have patients that no one can ever satisfy..
    But, you have still provided privacy, introduced yourself by name, etc. and they really can't deny that..then, overall care will probably not be so good, but..
    Anyway, this is actually a trick, but when trials have been performed on live people, it actually worked...
    Now, to get people to remember your name and mention you, you have to be extremely nice, nonjudgemental, and go way out of your way...check on them frequently, look in on them and say goodbye, etc. (and candy and gum work well as bribes as well) You have to take the time to get to know what they really would like..and give it to them if possible..sometimes all they want is a smiling face..but not very often..
    Good luck
    Thanks for the tips. I don't know about your ER but what kills our scores are parking and doctors. Well, you can only do so much!

    Again, thanks,
    Pam
  12. by   mtnmom
    candy or gum as bribes???? with my luck the pt would choke on it ...plus the whole idea of a bribe seems kinda slimy to me.

    I do not give bribes of any sort. I give the best care that I am capable of given the situation and treat the patient and family with respect and kindness - that is the best that I can do.

    I introduce myself each shift as "hello, I'm...and I will be with you tonight". When I leave the room I remind them that I will be checking in frequently, that if they are asleep I will try not to wake them unless necessary, and that they should not hesitate to call inbetween if they need anything. When I leave in the morning I say goodbye if they are awake and wish them a good day. Whenever possible I try to learn a little bit about them, get to know them and infuse some humor - maybe get them to laugh - good therapy for anyone!

    Our hospital uses a system where for every ten positive written comments that you save and turn in you get a pin. I have only gotten two so far because I don't solicit compliments. Anyway, where would I wear tons of them?

    A large portion of our patient population is Hispanic and non-English speaking and I do my best to communicate with them as well as possible and really treat them well (a lot of nurses treat them like do-do). I never hear comments from these people because often they do not have a lot of education and can't speak English, but I sure feel good inside when I see them smile. One patient I had a few months ago gave me some sort of little decorative thing her mother had made for the people who took really good care of her. It is quite a piece of work - not fine art by any means but it means more to me than ten pins. I display it proudly in my family room.

    In the meantime I keep all the candy and gum for myself....if my kids dont get it first
    Last edit by mtnmom on Mar 8, '04 : Reason: to fix the smileys
  13. by   teeituptom
    Our Hosp doesnt carry bandaids than the generic boring ones. So I always carry a box of decorator bandaids or fred flintstone ones, or dallas cowboy ones or dallas stars ones.
    for the kiddies, and some adults also

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