How do I know the ER is for me? - page 2

Hi everyone. I just had an interview in the ED at the hospital I currently work at. The job is mine if I decide to pursue it (it was a bid). Now I'm not quite sure if I want it! Fact is I don't know... Read More

  1. Visit  edmia profile page
    0
    Take it. The ED is fantastic. Your nursing assessment and technical skills will grow tremendously and you'll be able to pick your jobs if after a while you decide it's not a perfect fit.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  2. Visit  N1colina profile page
    0
    Quote from OnlybyHisgraceRN
    I'll be on nights as well, which will be super busy. My main weakness is IV starts and drawing blood. That gives me so much anxiety.
    Oh really? See, I miss drawing blood! I did it in family practice, but haven't since. I've never started an IV, but I am excited to start learning! You know what I'm nervous about? Someone coding on me! I still have to take ACLS & PCLS, and I haven't really had too many codes on our floor. Most codes we call are Code B's (strokes), but those are easy! I am worried about the patient in respiratory distress, or cardiac arrest....I guess because I haven't had one yet, which is normal, right?
  3. Visit  N1colina profile page
    0
    Quote from edmia
    Take it. The ED is fantastic. Your nursing assessment and technical skills will grow tremendously and you'll be able to pick your jobs if after a while you decide it's not a perfect fit.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    Sweet. Thanks!
  4. Visit  emtb2rn profile page
    0
    Quote from N1colina
    Most codes we call are Code B's (strokes), but those are easy!
    Not to be snarky but what happens when you call a code stroke on your current unit? Does the pt go somewhere else to be taken care of by somebody else? Yeah, that's easy. In the ER that stroke is your pt until they go to the OR which is rare or their unit bed is ready (see threads on unit holds in the ER) or the're transferred. And you still have other pts.

    Most strokes we call in the ER happen before the pt gets to the room, gets undressed, lined, labbed or often even had vitals taken. And the clock is ticking from when that code is called. Door to ct in 25 minutes, ct read in 45 minutes of arrival, tpa if indicated in 60 minutes of arrival.

    Don't mean to discourage you but be careful about what you think is "easy".
  5. Visit  N1colina profile page
    1
    Quote from emtb2rn

    Not to be snarky but what happens when you call a code stroke on your current unit? Does the pt go somewhere else to be taken care of by somebody else? Yeah, that's easy. In the ER that stroke is your pt until they go to the OR which is rare or their unit bed is ready (see threads on unit holds in the ER) or the're transferred. And you still have other pts.

    Most strokes we call in the ER happen before the pt gets to the room, gets undressed, lined, labbed or often even had vitals taken. And the clock is ticking from when that code is called. Door to ct in 25 minutes, ct read in 45 minutes of arrival, tpa if indicated in 60 minutes of arrival.

    Don't mean to discourage you but be careful about what you think is "easy".
    Thank you for your concern and your opinion on what you consider to be easy or difficult. I was simply stating my opinion, as well. Also, I wouldn't be so quick to judge on what I do with a patient when we call the stroke code... Because we are a STROKE UNIT so no I don't give up the patient after. I take care of them the whole time, and do everything you mentioned while keeping my 5 other patients....so I would tone it down a bit and not take what I'm saying to another person so personally... Let me rephrase for you: I am more comfortable with stroke codes because I deal with them more frequently. I am less comfortable dealing with cardiac arrests. Is that a more appropriate statement??
    Tina, RN likes this.


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