hostile chargenurse - page 2

My current charge nurse has really become hostile to employees. She has a sacarstic remark about everyone and everything. She has no problem making remarks to your face or behind your back. I work a... Read More

  1. by   bigfishsmallpond
    Quote from tlf91
    As a former ER Manager I can tell you the problem is not uncommon. The best advice I can give you is to document every event. In the time of confrontation or in discussion with the Manager or Director you will need this to reference. The problem is everyone is afraid of this person. Probably have been several to leave the department because of her. Make sure any confrontation you have with her is witnessed. House supervisor would be good. "He said she said" is not a good thing to have in this instance. If confrontation occurs, tell her very plainly that you will not continue the conversation until the House Supervisor is present. She will very soon avoid doing this with you because these people never want a witness. Demand respect. You tell her that she does not have to like you but you will not be treated unfairly or unprofessionally. You need to report this to your Manager. Most of the time they know whats going on but quite frankly without formal complaints and documentation, their hands are tied. Others will follow the lead. I hate that you have this situation. It makes for a miserable work environment. Good luck!!!
    Good advice, and I agree. I am a manager of an Ed and while I would like to say I have never fallen into that sort of behavior, I must admit that I have. There is alot of stress and frustration (also some fun!)working in an area like this. I found that the staff becomes very close and almost too involved with each other.It is hard to draw the line between what you are obligated to do as a manager, and what you want to do as a friend and fellow worker in the dept.Your CN sounds insecure , and that usually comes out in critical negative comments. Unfortunately, it is becoming a "her against us"and everyone wonders what side you are on. This is always a losing position-right now, it sucks to be you!Hopefully, your honesty and reputation will win out over the angry and hurt feelings.Consider NOT having a charge nurse. Perhaps if you all shared in the responsibilities, there would not be a need for someone to be in that role. Also, remember that there is a harrassment element here-your HR department needs to clear the area of the hostile environment!
  2. by   GDog7NYC
    Being the Night Shift Manager of my Emergency Department, I understand that there will be times that one may become snippy or a flat out b--ch. We all have our moments. But to deal with a Charge Nurse that is that way day in and day out? Sounds like someone needs a reality check and fast. I agree with what was said previously about someone being so burned out that perhaps they may need to step down and enjoy a change of pace. That helps tremendously. There have been times that I have felt like I did not want to be in charge for a night. When this happens, I talk to my staff, and hand over the desk to someone else while I take on a patient care assignment for the next 12 hours. I'm all the happier for it. Fortunately, I have worked with the same strong and very cohesive night shift for the last 4 years and I can virtually put anyone in charge and know they will be able to do a good job. Someone should suggest this approach to that Charge Nurse via your Nurse Manager. Go as a group. Write a letter. Whatever it takes. Just realize that there is strength in numbers. The person in charge of an ED should be seen as both an advocate for staff as well as patients, and should conduct themselves in a calm, organized and decisive manner. Anything less than that should not be tolerated.
  3. by   tlf91
    Quote from GDog7NYC
    Being the Night Shift Manager of my Emergency Department, I understand that there will be times that one may become snippy or a flat out b--ch. We all have our moments. But to deal with a Charge Nurse that is that way day in and day out? Sounds like someone needs a reality check and fast. I agree with what was said previously about someone being so burned out that perhaps they may need to step down and enjoy a change of pace. That helps tremendously. There have been times that I have felt like I did not want to be in charge for a night. When this happens, I talk to my staff, and hand over the desk to someone else while I take on a patient care assignment for the next 12 hours. I'm all the happier for it. Fortunately, I have worked with the same strong and very cohesive night shift for the last 4 years and I can virtually put anyone in charge and know they will be able to do a good job. Someone should suggest this approach to that Charge Nurse via your Nurse Manager. Go as a group. Write a letter. Whatever it takes. Just realize that there is strength in numbers. The person in charge of an ED should be seen as both an advocate for staff as well as patients, and should conduct themselves in a calm, organized and decisive manner. Anything less than that should not be tolerated.
    I applaud your knowing when to take a breather. I'm sure your coworkers respect you for that. I try to live by one rule. If I can not come up with something to say that is respectful I dont say anything at all. ER nurses go to the trenches everytime they walk through the door. Good shifts are far and few. You have to love it to understand why anyone would subject themselves to such an environment. I was charge nurse for 5 years and manager for three. I have walked away to gather myself on many occasions. I don't know about you but there are enough battles with patients, family members, docs, administration, EMS, etc..to have tensions among the staff. If there no team work not only is it miserable but dangerous. Great response. Wish you all the luck.
  4. by   tlf91
    Quote from gettingmymsn
    Good advice, and I agree. I am a manager of an Ed and while I would like to say I have never fallen into that sort of behavior, I must admit that I have. There is alot of stress and frustration (also some fun!)working in an area like this. I found that the staff becomes very close and almost too involved with each other.It is hard to draw the line between what you are obligated to do as a manager, and what you want to do as a friend and fellow worker in the dept.Your CN sounds insecure , and that usually comes out in critical negative comments. Unfortunately, it is becoming a "her against us"and everyone wonders what side you are on. This is always a losing position-right now, it sucks to be you!Hopefully, your honesty and reputation will win out over the angry and hurt feelings.Consider NOT having a charge nurse. Perhaps if you all shared in the responsibilities, there would not be a need for someone to be in that role. Also, remember that there is a harrassment element here-your HR department needs to clear the area of the hostile environment!

    Thanks. You are absolutely right. In some situations it is better to rotate charge. I was very slow in placing fixed charge nurses in my department. When I did, they were held to the highest standards and expectations. Disrespect was not a part of the job description and never acceptable behavior. I was blessed with very great employees. Rarely had problems except with one nurse and with time she came around to my way of thinking. The only problem with the "hostile environment" as least where I worked was that administration frowned upon using this route. Usually labeled the person as "trouble".Of course I worked for HCA who writes really pretty words in their policies about this but does not quite seem to follow them. I just think its really sad that we can no longer just take care of people. I wish you so much luck. You sound like a good Manager.

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