ER vs ICU, how did we get there? - page 6

by RNin92

5,111 Unique Views | 56 Comments

Ok... In my hospital the lines have been drawn. I don't like them...the lines I mean. Somewhere along the way the ED has become the enemy of the ICU and I am not sure how that happened. So I am looking to see how things... Read More


  1. 0
    personalities is an issue


    as that old song saya


    youve got personality
    walk with personality
    talk with personalty, too

    cute song

    very apropos
  2. 0
    I had a patient come in the ER a few days ago. CP, diaphoresis, vomiting, SOB, and ST elevations through the roof. We did the whole nine yards on her, NTG, Heparin, and Retavase. Finally by the second dose of Retavase she started to reprofuse.....which, in itself, can be a touchy, scary time. Luckily she didn't fibrilate. I had her for about 90 minutes before I transported her to ICU. When I got to the unit with her, I attempted to give report to the nurse taking over, all she was concerned about was why the patient still had her pants on!!!! Who cares that we just freaking saved this lady's life! I calmed explained to her that removing the patients pants was not a high priority in an acute MI situation and walked out the door. Is it just me?? :angryfire
  3. 0
    Wow. I'm ever so thankful our Ed and Icu get along. We even have a code nurse and one of her jobs is to come down when we have an ICU pt and help us if needed or facilitate the trf by placing the pt. Bed control still gets notified but there is a direct link between our ED and the ICU. I treasure our ICU nurses and their abilities because while I'm perfectly comfortable stabilizing a pt. I'm not comfortable monitoring them forever. It's always nice to know there is help even just an comforting voice telling us hang in there you're doing good.
    We run into problems holding pt's in ED- ICU pts' nurse's have there own protocols as set by the internal med docs. We don't have that access and once pt is admitted the ED docs don't touch the pt. So the reletionship between ED and our ICU is close - we desperately try not to dump on them and they in turn are there when we need help.
  4. 0
    Quote from marcicatherine
    I had a patient come in the ER a few days ago. CP, diaphoresis, vomiting, SOB, and ST elevations through the roof. We did the whole nine yards on her, NTG, Heparin, and Retavase. Finally by the second dose of Retavase she started to reprofuse.....which, in itself, can be a touchy, scary time. Luckily she didn't fibrilate. I had her for about 90 minutes before I transported her to ICU. When I got to the unit with her, I attempted to give report to the nurse taking over, all she was concerned about was why the patient still had her pants on!!!! Who cares that we just freaking saved this lady's life! I calmed explained to her that removing the patients pants was not a high priority in an acute MI situation and walked out the door. Is it just me?? :angryfire

    HAHAHA are you sure you are in Arkansas and not here in PA with me??? LOL One night I had a lady come in with full blown pulmonary edema, we worked like a bunch of madmen to get her stablized. I cut off her vest (some nicely knitted vest with button holes too small for the buttons so I could not get it off easily) anyway, it was touch and go for a while, but we finally stabilized her. The next night I had a call from the ICU nurses trying to chastise me for cutting off her clothes. I told them I chose to sacrifice the clothes instead of the patient.. good grief!
  5. 0
    Quote from marcicatherine
    I had a patient come in the ER a few days ago. CP, diaphoresis, vomiting, SOB, and ST elevations through the roof. We did the whole nine yards on her, NTG, Heparin, and Retavase. Finally by the second dose of Retavase she started to reprofuse.....which, in itself, can be a touchy, scary time. Luckily she didn't fibrilate. I had her for about 90 minutes before I transported her to ICU. When I got to the unit with her, I attempted to give report to the nurse taking over, all she was concerned about was why the patient still had her pants on!!!! Who cares that we just freaking saved this lady's life! I calmed explained to her that removing the patients pants was not a high priority in an acute MI situation and walked out the door. Is it just me?? :angryfire

    '
    You promptly reach over with your trauma scissors and cut them off for her and then smile sweetly
    Or let her borrow your trauma scissors
  6. 0
    Quote from teeituptom
    '
    You promptly reach over with your trauma scissors and cut them off for her and then smile sweetly
    Or let her borrow your trauma scissors
    Hmmmmmm...

    I can think of a MUCH better use for those scissors!!!

    :angryfire :angryfire


    Kiddin'...Just Kiddin'
  7. 0
    I will leave that alone hehehehe


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