ER violence - page 7

:wavey: Hi I'm interested in knowing what types of violent situations you may have been exposed to in the ER. Does a lot of it come from drunks? Thanks Matt... Read More

  1. by   JBudd
    Tom, glad you're walking again, how much golf did you lose out on ?
  2. by   teeituptom
    Quote from JBudd
    Tom, glad you're walking again, how much golf did you lose out on ?
    a little over a week untill pain subsided
  3. by   TinyNurse
    I have a situation that I am still weired out about.

    I was working agency at a hospital in houston, and the charge wanted me to "help" with a lavage. ( do they even do that anymore??? haha) so i said, cool, and went into the patients room.

    the patient was an OD arms, legs flailing, etc. the primary nurse told me to hold her mouth open while he inserted, next thing i know, my arm is about to be broken.

    i told the nurse that we need other people to help restrain ........he refused. i told him then that we need security, we need restraints, he refused. I continued to help until my arm could no longer hold the pressure....... I told him i was leaving the room because it was unsafe.

    the primary nurse told me....."if you are going to nurse here you have to get used to this"

    *****>?????

    later i was called into the supervisors office because I "walked out during the middle of a procedure" I stated my case, and all was well

    point being the ANA takes a strong point against violence towards nurses. I've seen ribs broke, arms broke, i've been bitten, and i'm not gonna go through this just to do my JOB.

    ya know, in some states it's a felony to assault a doctor, but nothing to assault a nurse. that's sorta weird to me.
  4. by   HyperTension
    I find it interesting that ED/ICU nurses who are anti-taser are sooo quick to point out the fatalities of taser exposure over the past 4-5 years, (113 I think was the posted number), yet how many patients have you seen that are killed by (drugs, violence, ect, or worse yet by nosocomial infections contracted from poor handwashing, or the floor nurse who OD'd a patient on coumading, digoxin, or the forever loved narcotic overdose that is now smurf blue secondary to the transdermal fentanyl, epidural, and the 2 vicoden ES that the floor nurse gave the patient for "breakthrough pain" whos eggs where forever scrambled due to hypoxia?

    **I know, long run-on sentence....**
  5. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from TinyNurse
    I have a situation that I am still weired out about.

    I was working agency at a hospital in houston, and the charge wanted me to "help" with a lavage. ( do they even do that anymore??? haha) so i said, cool, and went into the patients room.

    the patient was an OD arms, legs flailing, etc. the primary nurse told me to hold her mouth open while he inserted, next thing i know, my arm is about to be broken.

    i told the nurse that we need other people to help restrain ........he refused. i told him then that we need security, we need restraints, he refused. I continued to help until my arm could no longer hold the pressure....... I told him i was leaving the room because it was unsafe.

    the primary nurse told me....."if you are going to nurse here you have to get used to this"

    *****>?????

    later i was called into the supervisors office because I "walked out during the middle of a procedure" I stated my case, and all was well

    point being the ANA takes a strong point against violence towards nurses. I've seen ribs broke, arms broke, i've been bitten, and i'm not gonna go through this just to do my JOB.

    ya know, in some states it's a felony to assault a doctor, but nothing to assault a nurse. that's sorta weird to me.
    The primary nurse was wrong and should be reported to risk management, of the facility, and your agency. And battery, committed on anyone, is a crime.It is the prosecution that is a^^^^

    Grannynurse
  6. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from HyperTension
    I find it interesting that ED/ICU nurses who are anti-taser are sooo quick to point out the fatalities of taser exposure over the past 4-5 years, (113 I think was the posted number), yet how many patients have you seen that are killed by (drugs, violence, ect, or worse yet by nosocomial infections contracted from poor handwashing, or the floor nurse who OD'd a patient on coumading, digoxin, or the forever loved narcotic overdose that is now smurf blue secondary to the transdermal fentanyl, epidural, and the 2 vicoden ES that the floor nurse gave the patient for "breakthrough pain" whos eggs where forever scrambled due to hypoxia?

    **I know, long run-on sentence....**
    I am one of those anti-tazer nurses. And since I worked in Kings County, Brooklyn, ER, yes I've seen more then my share of violence and drug deaths. And I have been part of investigation teams for nursing and medical mistakes. I still do not believe it is my role orc rsponsibility to taz any patient. And I am surprised that Risk Management signed off on such a policy.

    Grannynurse
  7. by   ohioln
    One thing might be good to put in ERs is a doctor and nurse to see people who come in for something they need on a regular basis and then can be sent out quickly. Where I used to live in PA, there were no urgent care places, so if you needed a doctor and it was after hours, frequently you had to go to the ER if you couldn't wait until the next day the doctor's office was open. Also, maybe clinics around the clock, small ones, could be open to see patients who are not actually and emergency, rather than have them sitting out in the waiting room for hrs. With staffing the way it is, I don't know where the staff would come from, but it's an idea anyway.
  8. by   ohioln
    JBudd, I got hit in the face by a woman who was psych. She hit me in the face with a coffee cup! I'm thankful I wasn't hurt and my glasses weren't broken.
  9. by   jojotoo
    If somebody "needs something on a regular basis" why are they coming to the ER at all? THAT is what their PMD is for!
  10. by   Gussiegoose
    Quote from EDinNC
    If only I had a nickel for every time I have heard "I'm a hard stick..." And I get it on the first try. Pts need to understand that we start IV's on sooo many pts every DAY, many of which are dialysis pts and they are the most challenging. This is our job, and most of the time the IV starts are the easiest part of it. Pts just like to bring a little attention to themselves and add drama.


    Totally agree. :yeahthat:
  11. by   EMSChild
    Everyday in the ER I am verbally abused and on a slow week I’m hit at least once. I have gone out to my car at night only to find a pt. leaning on my trunk. Got a new car REAL quick! Had a hep C pt. scratch me while drawing blood. I’ve gone in to answer a call light and had my nose broke by the pt’s husband. I’ve been kicked, slapped, punched, yelled at, and whatever else. I have a vivid memory of shoving a cop aside and throwing my self over a kid while the cops had their guns pointed at the other pt in the room. That was pretty hair raising.

    I have pulled gang bangers, trying to finish the job, out of the trauma room, while the police stood there. I later asked one of the cops why he didn’t do anything, he said “I’m not that stupid”. Okay, cop with gun versus woman with forceps. Yeah, I’m probably the stupid one.

    I’ve had a guy three times my size, grab my shirt and attempt to throw me across the room. Thank whoever for the two medics and the doctor that tackled him before anything happened. Security showed up five minutes later. Where were they you ask? Well, the “ER only” security guard was upstairs in L&D and the other one was patrolling our phych unit, a mile away. When I first started in this hospital, we had a minimum of ten security guards in the hospital, with two extra to patrol the area. Thanks to the brilliant security director we have (on a good day) two guards for the 600 bed hospital plus the surrounding clinic, phych facility, and the parking areas. I know and trust the security guards, but, I also know that I can’t count on their assistance. It definitely scares me.

    I’m soon starting at a hospital, where they recommend bullet proof vests for ER staff. If I’m wearing a vest, I want a taser!
  12. by   ednurseeducator
    We have had multiple problems with violence in our ER. We are a suburban hospital that sees approximately 65,000 patients a year. Our biggest problem is the psych patients. However, in the last two months, we have had a patient come in and take out a knife at the nurses station and threaten to kill himself and anyone who came near him. The 2nd incident occurred when a jack knife was pulled on me by an alzheimers patient. But the worst happened three weeks ago. We had a patient who died. 2 years old. The godmother wanted to go back and see the child (again: she had already been back twice). We have a strict policy for visiots. They have to have a badge on. The triage nurse told her to hand on a second while she took care of an ill patient. The women went across the triage desk, grabbed her, punched her several times in the face and tried to choke her. In front of the whole waiting room. The nurse is now on PTSD leave. I sure do not feel safe.
  13. by   cinja
    When I was still a cop I tased a guy in the ER, it was a great shot. Picture this if you will. I am waiting for the guy we nabbed to get cleaned up before county will take him when this guy across the way is throwing a fit and trying to wrestle with the nurse and MD. I raise up form the chair I am in and pull the taser out. The MD see this move and knows to get him and the nurse down. I let him have it with a shot that just about maxed out the length of wire and made him talk like a little girl. When were cuffing this guy he resisted again and received several contact shots. With the MD still in the corner I asked him to clear this fool and looked at this guys only, not his burns and said I am pressing charges and Oh, yes he's fine. With that the other guy was quickly finished up and took both out to county. I spent the rest of the night doing paper work.

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