ER violence - page 5

:wavey: Hi I'm interested in knowing what types of violent situations you may have been exposed to in the ER. Does a lot of it come from drunks? Thanks Matt... Read More

  1. by   MassED
    Quote from grannynurseFNP
    I would like to respond from the other side, when a patient feels threatened by a nurse. I am a very hard stick, for drawing blood and starting IVs. I warn the nursing staff of this and request someone who is known for successfully starting on hard sticks. Generally, my request is met in a positive manner. However, I had the experience of having a nurse refuse to stop sticking me, after I had requested she stop twice. The third time, in a very loud voice, I threatened to hit her, if she didn't stop immediately. Needless to say, she stopped and it bought a doctor and two other nurses to my room. This nurse was committing assualt and battery on me. However, I have been criticized, by my peers, for threating to strike this nurse. Criticism I feel is totally unwarrented. Yes, they are patients who can and do assault staff, as do their family members. On the other hard, there are staff who assault their patients by threating their well-being and their physical well being, in the guise of 'helping'. There are two sides to every picture.

    Grannynurse
    If only I had a nickel for every time I have heard "I'm a hard stick..." And I get it on the first try. Pts need to understand that we start IV's on sooo many pts every DAY, many of which are dialysis pts and they are the most challenging. This is our job, and most of the time the IV starts are the easiest part of it. Pts just like to bring a little attention to themselves and add drama.
  2. by   MassED
    Quote from grannynurseFNP
    Wonderful. That way, if the person being tazed has a cardiac arrest, they will get prompt treatment. The use of tazers, by police departments, is being questioned. They have no place in a hospital or a hospital's ER, IMHO.

    I am sure you are only joking but the hospital in which they are used is not. And it appears they have taken the easy way out of their control issue.

    Grannynurse
    Better to have some protection in an unstable environment and deal with the repercussions on that level, than to handle an injured nurse. I have yet to hear of cardiac arrest as a consequence from tazers, and we get those in custody almost daily that have been tazed by the police.
  3. by   mommatrauma
    Quote from EDinNC
    Better to have some protection in an unstable environment and deal with the repercussions on that level, than to handle an injured nurse. I have yet to hear of cardiac arrest as a consequence from tazers, and we get those in custody almost daily that have been tazed by the police.
    Actually, Amnesty International has reported 103 police taser related deaths since 2001. The date ranges from June 2001 to March 2005. With 13 of those deaths just in the first 3 months of this year...I'm not saying in the right setting they aren't benificial, but, they are not benign weapons either...
  4. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from EDinNC
    Better to have some protection in an unstable environment and deal with the repercussions on that level, than to handle an injured nurse. I have yet to hear of cardiac arrest as a consequence from tazers, and we get those in custody almost daily that have been tazed by the police.
    Has anyone ever questrioned why one's ER receives, in custody, people who have been tazed by the police? Sorry but two people have died, here in Florida, in the past six months. The effectiveness, of controlling a person, is not disputed. It is the consquences of being tazed and the supposed studies, by the manufacturers, that is being questioned. And a number of law enforcement communities are questioning these supposed studies.

    And I would like to point out one thing, there is no guarentee that one will never get hurt or even attacked at work. One's employer has a responsibility to attempt to ensure that it's employees remain as risk free as possible. This does not mean, in my opinion, give an employer the right to arm staff with a potentially letal device, to ensure no nurse gets hurt. And, in case you are wondering, I worked in a NYC public ER, one of the largest in the country.

    Grannynurse
  5. by   Knoodsen
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    I think it is time for a change, for you. And for your patients. You are setting yourselfup for burnout.

    Grannynurse
    This profession is what causes burnout. We work hard to learn our jobs and to stay current. We work like dogs caring for entitled jerks. Our employers hate us. That all being not quite enough, we must have other nurses picking on us. I take it back.............................. it isn't really a profession.
  6. by   ClaireMacl
    I had a knife pulled on me the other night. I wasn't in danger really, he wanted to kill himself because he wanted an immediate "Cat Scan", we call them CT scans in the UK, so I can only imagine he'd been watching alot of ER. He held the knife to his throat, but when I pressed the emergency button, he put it away.

    What annoyed me was that the fact that it was a swiss army knife meant that it wasn't determined to be a threatening weapon - I mean, that thing could have pierced the heart of any of us - but apparently too small for arrest! The knife was taken from him and because every one of us refused treatment of the man, he was removed from the ED.

    It goes on every day, I've been in the ED for three years, so it doesn't exactly phase me, but to say a knife is too small at three inches, that's madness!

    Cx
  7. by   spidermonkey
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    Last edit by spidermonkey on Mar 15, '06
  8. by   grannynurse FNP student
    Quote from Knoodsen
    This profession is what causes burnout. We work hard to learn our jobs and to stay current. We work like dogs caring for entitled jerks. Our employers hate us. That all being not quite enough, we must have other nurses picking on us. I take it back.............................. it isn't really a profession.

    I am sorry that you have had such a poor career, that it has given you such a negative attitude. Burnout can be avoided, if you really want to avoid it. And I have rarely come across entitled patients, or as you refer to them, jerks. And while I have had one employer that did not support the nursing staff, I left and worked for a very supportive woman. And advanced thru her company. And she was extremely supportive, following a bad accident that left me permanently disabled. You need to get some type of support and therapy. Your anger issues will interfer with your ability to work productively.
    I feel sorry for you. You must be very unhappy.

    Grannynurse
  9. by   teeituptom
    Quote from Knoodsen
    This profession is what causes burnout. We work hard to learn our jobs and to stay current. We work like dogs caring for entitled jerks. Our employers hate us. That all being not quite enough, we must have other nurses picking on us. I take it back.............................. it isn't really a profession.

    Burn out only happens if you dont golf
  10. by   Esme12
    To ALL,
    Emergency Department violence is on the rise!!!! Or shall I say that we as nurses have ceased to tolerate it just because we have RN behind our name!!
    The increase in violence is proportionate to the Ed overcrowding less inpatient beds and less inpatient RN's to care for those beds. The closing of many Mental Health Facilities across the country has lead to the ED being the forefront of mental health as well as everything else.!!!!!! Mental Healthe patients are self medicating with ETOH. The general public has this sense of entitlement that long waits and their percieved sense of an emergency and prompt treatment have made the ingredients for violence. I have worked in Downtown Gary IN (not as sweet as the song) and the South Side of chicago Cook County(before the new place) but I was never so frightened as I was In a burb of Boston where the average home is 1.1 mil by an unnamed airline pilot because his daughter had a chin lac and he had to wait more that 20 min!!! The administration and nursing are turning a blind eye towards the violence in the Ed. JACH doesn't want restraints you cannot violate a patients rights wtih unlawful search but I had a patient in a nice burb place cut himself out of his own restraints with his own knife after being brought in by police!!!! Our rent a cops Hewy Lewy and Dewy for 10.00 bucks an hour in shirts and ties don't quite cut it...but public image!? there is a disparing negligence for our ED's in the burbs as the City places get it! I have been an RN for 25 years and I wish I could say I have never been assaluted@! work!! :angryfire We need to wake up and stick together!! lost in boston
  11. by   teeituptom
    Had a 17 yo football player come in the other night, drunk as can be, He got combative and charged one of the female nurses, and I had to take him down.

    Now Im in my mid fifties, and Im getting way to old for this. I have several sore muscles. I certainly hope it doesnt hurt my Golfing.
  12. by   JBudd
    [QUOTE=grannynurse FNP student]Has anyone ever questrioned why one's ER receives, in custody, people who have been tazed by the police? Sorry but two people have died, here in Florida, in the past six months. The effectiveness, of controlling a person, is not disputed. It is the consquences of being tazed and the supposed studies, by the manufacturers, that is being questioned. And a number of law enforcement communities are questioning these supposed studies."

    There are dangers in any confrontation with the police, if they have to physically take you down you might get your head smacked on concrete hard enough to concuss, plus you put the officers at risk. Other alternatives? Guns ....... well, I'd rather be tazed than shot. Wears off faster. We end up checking out anyone who gets taken down, tazed or not, if they complain of pain. Cops don't just taze for the fun of it .... (and if yours do, make some noise about it to the community relations boards!). Most of those who come to my ED after being tazed are still cussing and combative, not the types to invoke a lot of sympathy, and certainly demonstrating why they got tazed in the first place.

    And before someone jumps on my case, they may not get much sympathy from me, but they certainly get my professional and thorough care.
  13. by   grannynurse FNP student
    [QUOTE=JBudd]
    Quote from grannynurse FNP student
    Has anyone ever questrioned why one's ER receives, in custody, people who have been tazed by the police? Sorry but two people have died, here in Florida, in the past six months. The effectiveness, of controlling a person, is not disputed. It is the consquences of being tazed and the supposed studies, by the manufacturers, that is being questioned. And a number of law enforcement communities are questioning these supposed studies."

    There are dangers in any confrontation with the police, if they have to physically take you down you might get your head smacked on concrete hard enough to concuss, plus you put the officers at risk. Other alternatives? Guns ....... well, I'd rather be tazed than shot. Wears off faster. We end up checking out anyone who gets taken down, tazed or not, if they complain of pain. Cops don't just taze for the fun of it .... (and if yours do, make some noise about it to the community relations boards!). Most of those who come to my ED after being tazed are still cussing and combative, not the types to invoke a lot of sympathy, and certainly demonstrating why they got tazed in the first place.

    And before someone jumps on my case, they may not get much sympathy from me, but they certainly get my professional and thorough care.
    Jolting a healthy, young male, without any known cardiac problems, with 50,000 v is usually not going to result in any lasting problems, to him. How many of those, who show up in our ERs, after being taz are young, healthy males without any known cardiac problems? Not many. And those that are taz, by police officers, are generally high on drugs or have mental health problems and/or other physical health problems. And why is it the responsibility of a health care professional to taz anyone? And why are police departments now questioning the possible negative outcomes? And why are police departments now questioning the manufacturers 'studies'? And, why, in other countries, that experience the same problems, do they deal more effectively with them, other then committing another act of violence?

    And before anyone jumps on me for being a bleeding heart liberal, I am and I am also the niece of a retired NYC police officer. And neither he nor I believe it is the responsibility of a nurse to taz anyone, let alone a patient.

    Grannynurse

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