ER or ICU? - page 2

Hi! I am a student nurse who is interested in working in critical care. I need to select a site for my senior preceptorship, and was wondering what the best setting for this would be - working in an... Read More

  1. by   LilgirlRN
    Originally posted by 502Nurse
    Hi!
    I am a student nurse who is interested in working in critical care. I need to select a site for my senior preceptorship, and was wondering what the best setting for this would be - working in an ICU unit or in the ER. It seems the ER would give a much broader view of urgent care, yet the ICU is where I would like to work.

    Any comments or suggestions are appreciated!

    Thank you.
    I was hired to work in CCU straight out of nursing school, back then we sorta doubled as ICU too when they were full. I now work in the ER and have for many years, but if it weren't for the experience I had working in and intensive care setting, I would not have been able to function in the ER back when I first joined the staff. I agree with many others who have said that you have time to learn the whyfors in ICU, things move much too quickly in the ED for you to learn things like how to take care of an entubated patient, hopefully they won't be in the ED for long after they are tubed.

    As far as gaining experience is concerned, in a crisis situation, such as a code, stand back and watch what each member of the team does. When it is all over ask questions, don't ever be afraid to ask..the only stupid questions are the ones that are never asked. I am continually amazed at the lack of knowledge among some of my peers, people who have adequate experience (as in years of nursing), but just don't know things that I consider essential to being an ED nurse. Watch, gather your thoughts and ask as many questions as your preceptor will answer. If you are interested in any particular thing, seek out the nurse that is most qualified in that area of experise and spend time with him/her. ED nurses tend to fall into the "Jack of all trades" category, they know a little about a lot of things, some seem to excel in certain areas however.

    I wish you great luck starting out in your career, the only other thing I would consider doing other than nursing would be medicine. I love what I do and as a result I am very good at it ( I should be, I've been doing it FOREVER!) You cannot beat nursing for commeraderie, and for new nurses, pay. It also pays to move around some, change hospitals, each time you move, you increase your pay, then chose the one you like the best and settle there. OK..I'm running off at the fingers here, good luck 502. Wendy
  2. by   Granted Fal
    I may be starting ER as a new grad and a comment in your reply piqued my interest: "I am continually amazed at the lack of knowledge among some of my peers, people who have adequate experience (as in years of nursing), but just don't know things that I consider essential to being an ED nurse..."
    Not to hang you on a pole or anything, but I'm curious on what some examples of such things may be... especially since i don't want to be one of these kinds of nurses. I have a specialization in psych and detox nursing that i'm taking with me, but my fear is inadequate assessment skills, I didn't work critical care or EMS or all that... I was given the impression that these would develop especially with the increased volume of patients that you encounter. Any feedback would be appreciated.
    Rod



    Quote from LilgirlRN
    I was hired to work in CCU straight out of nursing school, back then we sorta doubled as ICU too when they were full. I now work in the ER and have for many years, but if it weren't for the experience I had working in and intensive care setting, I would not have been able to function in the ER back when I first joined the staff. I agree with many others who have said that you have time to learn the whyfors in ICU, things move much too quickly in the ED for you to learn things like how to take care of an entubated patient, hopefully they won't be in the ED for long after they are tubed.

    As far as gaining experience is concerned, in a crisis situation, such as a code, stand back and watch what each member of the team does. When it is all over ask questions, don't ever be afraid to ask..the only stupid questions are the ones that are never asked. I am continually amazed at the lack of knowledge among some of my peers, people who have adequate experience (as in years of nursing), but just don't know things that I consider essential to being an ED nurse. Watch, gather your thoughts and ask as many questions as your preceptor will answer. If you are interested in any particular thing, seek out the nurse that is most qualified in that area of experise and spend time with him/her. ED nurses tend to fall into the "Jack of all trades" category, they know a little about a lot of things, some seem to excel in certain areas however.

    I wish you great luck starting out in your career, the only other thing I would consider doing other than nursing would be medicine. I love what I do and as a result I am very good at it ( I should be, I've been doing it FOREVER!) You cannot beat nursing for commeraderie, and for new nurses, pay. It also pays to move around some, change hospitals, each time you move, you increase your pay, then chose the one you like the best and settle there. OK..I'm running off at the fingers here, good luck 502. Wendy
  3. by   askater11
    Wow interesting!!!

    Sounds like not too many like the ICU. That's where I"m at now--though I sometimes float to other telemtry floors.

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ER or ICU?