ER Nursing

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    I'm a new nursing student, who was pondering a couple of questions. First: What are the different levels of trauma units, or emergency rooms, and how big are they?...and secondly, how close is the television show "ER" to reality? I've heard both extremes...either it is very similar to it, or it is nothing like it at all. I particularly would like to know about the nurses.....Thank You, TMP
  2. 4 Comments so far...

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    TMP - Trauma Centers are designated hospitals, that are supposably ( and I use that loosely) capable of dealing with a person or persons involved in a trauma situation. For each level, I, II, III, IV, there are certain requirements that need to be met. Level I & II Trauma centers are basically the same, with only one difference. A level I trauma center, muct do research, and publish their research and findings. Level II's are not rquired to do this. Both Level I & II trauma centers, are required to have a in hosptial, board certified surgeon at all times. They are also to have a OR crew ready, and/or on call within 30 minutes at all times. I don't know much about level II & IV trauma centers, there are not that many of them. I can tell you in Ohio, that I beleive there are no level III, IV trauma centers. Basicaly the requiresments are less and less. If you want to find out more, or are interested in trauma look up the ENA web site @ WWW.ENA.org - I think this is right. Tell them your interested in taking the TNCC, and obtaining a book for it. That will tell you pretty much anything you want to know. Size of the hospital has no correlation with a trauma center. The level IV has the bare minimum requirements.

    As far as the TV show. I work in a ER in a suburb of Cleveland. We see about 35,000 patients a year. A rough guess, 65% get treated and released, 35% need to be admitted. OUt of those people Traeted and released 15% probably don't need to come in. You will see that many people use the er like a doctor's office. You will see everything, from AAA's, MI's - to a stuffy nose and intoxication. We have days when all the rooms are full, and a few individuals get put in the hall. Simply because there are more patients, than we have room for. There will also be nights when you see only 20 people during your shift. Only once every two to three weeks, does our er seem remotely close to TV. You will see that you rarely have 4 or 5 people all crashing at the same time, or with immediate life threatening problems (that require attention, that second). It might be more similar in some of Chicago's, NY, or LA's inner city er. I would bet most likely not though. Any other questions, post them. Later-


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    I work in a level III ER and we see about 70,000 people a year......we get our share trauma that are brought in by personal vehicles otherwise the traumas are supposed to go to the Level I in our area and the EMS are pretty good about this....I've also worked in a Level I and they saw less patients then we do here but they did have a lot more protocals and procedures to follow....there is not much leway with a lot of level I trauma centers...also, the residents will drive you crazy...if you're nice to them they follow you around like puppy dogs and they're always in your way when you have a really sick patient...good luck :-)
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    I have had er exper in a number 3 trauma center i ant to work in number 1 or 2 trauma i woant to be an er tech do you know i would go by doing that i need to get my foot in the door can someone help i am an emt can someone send me a reply

  6. 0
    I have had er exper in a number 3 trauma center i ant to work in number 1 or 2 trauma i woant to be an er tech do you know i would go by doing that i need to get my foot in the door can someone help i am an emt can someone send me a reply



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