ER job interview, need help!!!

  1. Hey guys!
    I'm quite new here, and need some advise from you in the know outthere.
    I've been an RN x 15 yrs, but left my staff RN position (med/surg) back in 19 95 I've done all kinds of paper-pushing jobs since then, like managed care, case management, home care, and all other "cares" imaginable. I also managed to get an M.S in Acupuncture, and was in the private practice for a while...and...All of the sudden, I started hating myself for being "underachived",pretty much destroyed everything I've done, and went off to a Caribbean med school . The sense of "reality" came back to me rather quickly ( 2 semesters), when I realized what I'm getting myself into. I came back quite sick both physically, and quite beatten up mentally. So it's now almost one year later, and I'm just beginning to get some sense of normalcy again. But I realized that after doing paper-pushing for so long, I've developed aversion to it. I know I need to get back to the basics ASAP. So just for a heck of it I've "fired a few shots" of my resume and, wat do you know, they called me. Of course, they asked me about psych and med/surg (done both), but I told them I want ER, or critical care Am I crazy? I think that with proper training, and the orientation I could do it. They said they'll consider me for ER :kiss. Good. I want something fast moving, and clinical. So what do you say guys...please give me some DOs and DON'Ts for the ER interview.
    Sorry for all this rambling
    Your input is greatly appreciated.
    Thanks
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   KatieBell
    Relax. If they ask any questions about lack of critical care (which they very well might), tell them you want to take a critical care class. Remember that MOST of the admitted patients really do go to a MED/Surg floor, so the majority of ED patients are Med Surg, dischargeable, leaving some really sick ones. We think about the sick ones because they cause more stress...and it isn't very heroic to tell your S.O. Hey, I saw four people with Gastroenteritis today...
    I'd just stress your interest to learn, your experience with Psych (as many ED nurses do not like psych patients, and many ED patients who have medical problems have psych issues, you'll be an asset!). Be positive about your past experiences, and don't harp on them, and appear flexible. Be sure to have all the stats you can get on the place itself, and of course ask appropriate questions about orientation and all that.

    What type of ED is it? Is it a trauma center or a community hospital- do they typically take new grads? If they normally take new grads, I would think it would not be a problem to train you.
    Good Luck, let us know how the Interview goes!!!
  4. by   Papadoc
    Hi KatieBell!
    Thank You very much for your repply. It makes a lot of sense. It's a City hospital (HHC in NYC). Basically they get very diverse population there. It's near the Belt Parkway in Brooklyn, so they get their fare share of MVA, within 10-15 min drive there are housing projects, so lots of chem dependency/psych, some gun shots, also lots, and lots of seniors around, so they get the "frequent Flyer" milage. Also lots of outpatient clinics everything from primary care to vascular surgery. I'm applying there by choice...it's a walking distance for me, and if I could get flex, I may be able start rebuilding my Acupuncture practice on the alternate days. I actually did intake for several home care companies on-site at this hospital, but I wasn't their employee. I also managed to be a patient in this ER some 5-6 yrs ago ... Well...for a New York "City" hospital, I guess, it was totally "organic" experience :chuckle ,if you know what I mean. I could most definitely get a job at some of these "brand" name, magnet hospitals. But it would involve commute to the City, and too much of politics. Oh, we'll see how that goes. I truely hope that giving ER a shot is worth it.

    Thanks again
    atieBell]Relax. If they ask any questions about lack of critical care (which they very well might), tell them you want to take a critical care class. Remember that MOST of the admitted patients really do go to a MED/Surg floor, so the majority of ED patients are Med Surg, dischargeable, leaving some really sick ones. We think about the sick ones because they cause more stress...and it isn't very heroic to tell your S.O. Hey, I saw four people with Gastroenteritis today...
    I'd just stress your interest to learn, your experience with Psych (as many ED nurses do not like psych patients, and many ED patients who have medical problems have psych issues, you'll be an asset!). Be positive about your past experiences, and don't harp on them, and appear flexible. Be sure to have all the stats you can get on the place itself, and of course ask appropriate questions about orientation and all that.

    What type of ED is it? Is it a trauma center or a community hospital- do they typically take new grads? If they normally take new grads, I would think it would not be a problem to train you.
    Good Luck, let us know how the Interview goes!!! [/QUOTE]
  5. by   NYNewGrad
    Quote from Papadoc
    Hi KatieBell!
    Thank You very much for your repply. It makes a lot of sense. It's a City hospital (HHC in NYC). Basically they get very diverse population there. It's near the Belt Parkway in Brooklyn, so they get their fare share of MVA, within 10-15 min drive there are housing projects, so lots of chem dependency/psych, some gun shots, also lots, and lots of seniors around, so they get the "frequent Flyer" milage. Also lots of outpatient clinics everything from primary care to vascular surgery. I'm applying there by choice...it's a walking distance for me, and if I could get flex, I may be able start rebuilding my Acupuncture practice on the alternate days. I actually did intake for several home care companies on-site at this hospital, but I wasn't their employee. I also managed to be a patient in this ER some 5-6 yrs ago ... Well...for a New York "City" hospital, I guess, it was totally "organic" experience :chuckle ,if you know what I mean. I could most definitely get a job at some of these "brand" name, magnet hospitals. But it would involve commute to the City, and too much of politics. Oh, we'll see how that goes. I truely hope that giving ER a shot is worth it.

    Thanks again
    [/QUOTE]

    Hmmm... CI hospital?
    Read your post with interest. I'm a brand new grad BSN and have an interview this week for an ER daytime position in a local hospital. I have NO er experience and was wondering what I can say that will make a positive impression on the nurse manager?
    Last edit by NYNewGrad on Jan 12, '06
  6. by   Papadoc
    Hi NYNewGrad!
    Congratulations!
    You should not have any problems getting a job, even though you've just graduated. Emphasize your willingness, and the ability to learn. You'll get orientation first, then the probation. They usually build your case/patient load at reasonable pace. At some point, of course, you'll be expected to function independently. So put your best foot forward. Your interviewers are also humans (I hope :chuckle ).They too were new grads once upon a time. But do your homework, and be ready to answer some dirrect Qs,i.e: Why do you want to work in ER vs other units? How do you handle stress, and fast pace of inner city ER?etc. Remember, they are interviewing you, but also you are interviewing them. It's got to "click" for both paries.
    Best of Luck to you. I know you'll do fine

    Hmmm... CI hospital?
    Read your post with interest. I'm a brand new grad BSN and have an interview this week for an ER daytime position in a local Brooklyn hospital. I have NO er experience and was wondering what I can say that will make a positive impression on the nurse manager?[/QUOTE]
  7. by   NYNewGrad
    ...
    Last edit by NYNewGrad on Jan 12, '06
  8. by   Veteran Nurse
    ED part time will turn into FT before you know it. You should not have any problen getting enough hours PRN until then.

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