ER internships or programs for new grads?

  1. Hello there. I was wondering if anyone knows of any hospitals that have ER programs for new grads either internships or extensive orientation. Thank you very much for you time.
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   ERCNNKY
    UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE HOSPITAL IS JUST NOW INITIATING A NEW GRAD PROGRAM WITH EXTENDED ORIENTATION. DON'T KNOW IF THIS IS A GOOD IDEA IN EMERGENCY CARE. THINK YOU MAY NEED SOME EXPERIENCE UNDER YOUR BELT BEFORE YOU GO INTO EMERGENCY NURSING.
  4. by   ERRN93

    Hi,
    I agree, jumping right into ER Nursing may be a bad idea.
    Emergency Nursing is "Different" from other areas of nursing. I think a new grad is easily overwhelmed by all the " Not by the book experiences" you encounter, almost daily
    Take some time and get some experience under your belt, the ER will still be there.
  5. by   CHUBBY
    I'm strongly in agreement with all of the above regarding ER- more pts are coming in sicker- and they're doing more to them in the ER than before (concious sedation , d&c's )
    In the past,I've worked where we've held 2 intubated OD's overnight in the ER for lack of an ICU bed, and your sick cardiacs can wait for ever if there's only one ICU bed left and a trauma rolls in the door. I only see it getting worse- the population is getting older, with multiple problems to manage, there's that "upcoming" nursing shortage in the next few years, we're going to be having an "observation" area soon where people are held for <24 hours and then d/c'd...
    Anyone for WaWa? At least they get profit-sharing...
  6. by   KR
    Hi,
    First of all I would like to thank everyone for their input. I have one question or thing to add about working in the ER etc. I have been involved in EMS and running on the ambulances since i was 14 and got my EMT-B at 16. Would that make a difference in if I should wait to work in the ER or still think I should wait. Thank you all very much.
    Kimberly Rush
  7. by   NurseyK
    I have heard a rumor lately that it is illegal in New York to hire new grads in ER. Anyone else heard the same? (We have 2 newbies in our ER at present...) I can't seem to find any info at legal sites...Thankx!
  8. by   Aurelia Fox
    KR, I am a nearly new graduate nurse myself. I agree with you that experience in an area doe make a diffrence as to if you should go into it as a "newbie." Anyway, I live in Flagstaff, AZ. Our hospital here (small medical center) just starting hiring into the ER with their new grad program. There is one position open every spring in the ER (I don't know when you graduate), it is already filled for this year. I know because it is a friend of mine who has similar experience to you. Getting a job in a specialty area can be harder than med-surg but it is possible. I wish you good luck and don't think you should give up your dream of working in the ER out of school.
  9. by   DHall14206
    KR- I graduated with my BSN 7 years ago and entered in to a residency at Tacoma General ER which prepared me for the fast pace of the ER setting. I believe that there is a very small window of opportunity for RN's to function optimally in today's ER's. They are fast paced, high acuity, heart pumping shifts that wears and tears on a nurse. I find that the new grads that I have since worked with have high energy, empathy, and stamina to keep up with the pace and obtain the needed skills with the residency program. Good luck.
  10. by   CEN35
    I see you do not live far from Cleveland. I work for a hospital now associated with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Finding experienced ER nurses to work a part-time or full-time position is getting more difficult all the time. Certainly this applies to 2nd and 3rd shift jobs. The more experienced nurses are seeking jobs that are not associated with the clinical setting. All of this leads to the hiring of more and more new grads. I was the second new grad hired in to the er at our hospital. Since then, 3 or four more have bben hired also. Most orienting time ranges from 4 - 12 weeks, depending on the persons ability to catch on and do well. Most hospitals decide the amount of orientation time individually. You'll have to check around.

    CEN
  11. by   jenny lynn
    Hello KR,
    I too am a new grad RN and have worked in an ER as a cna/clerk for two years. I have to be honest with you: I'm getting a little sick of all the resistance toward new grads in the ER. ER is also my passion and I intend to go right into ER. I agree it is high-paced and specialized but what better place for a new nurse, full of energy and motivation to learn. If these hospitals and nurses were more open to initiating a new grad program (maybe 2-3 new grads in a department who got real good precepting) We would survive and excell. If these ER RN's spent half as much time teaching us as they do on their egos then they's be raising the new generation of ER nurses (not to compete with them but to complement them in the work place). There, that should get a reply and I am open to any feedback.
  12. by   nicolegrow
    I understand that patient safety is and will always be #1, but it is disheartening to hear that experienced nurses aren't welcoming new grads with open arms. We are not perfect, which is why we need the experienced nurses to help us transition from novice to expert.
    Hospitals in my area hire new grads in EDs and ICUs. They offer longer orientation periods and maintain a ratio of experienced nurses to new grads with patient safety in mind.
  13. by   Pixie.RN
    Quote from KR
    I have one question or thing to add about working in the ER etc. I have been involved in EMS and running on the ambulances since i was 14 and got my EMT-B at 16. Would that make a difference in if I should wait to work in the ER or still think I should wait.
    EMS experience can be helpful, but EMS is not the same as the ER. Certainly, there is some overlap, but it's a different world.

    The ER where I was an ER tech for nearly 4 years welcomed me with open arms when I became an RN (my nurse manager said something like, "I'm not letting go of you!" LOL). But even with that ER experience, plus being a paramedic for the last 6 years, it still took hard work to make that transition to ER RN -- so don't expect to hit the ground running.
  14. by   MassED
    Quote from KR
    Hello there. I was wondering if anyone knows of any hospitals that have ER programs for new grads either internships or extensive orientation. Thank you very much for you time.
    If the training for the new RN in the ER is comprehensive, with the right nurses, and for an adequate length of time, I would say it could be on a case by case basis. I really do think that a new nurse needs time on the floor to understand the flow of the hospital: admissions/discharges, orders, calling docs, medication administration, etc. There's so much you don't want to have to explain in the ER (the basics). It just makes it a smaller learning curve when you do go to the ER.

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