ER: A Family's Emotional Well Being - page 2

by AMS7958

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The nurses took report on both patients and prepared the trauma bays for a couple in their 80's who had been T-boned when the husband pulled into an intersection. No current life threatening emergencies were reported. Each... Read More


  1. 5
    I was being precepted by a nurse once who got in the face of a surgeon yelling at her to run a pt straight to the OR, in order to let him kiss his wife goodbye. I'll never forget that courage. You probably did more than you know. God Bless you!
    1feistymama, JustMe54, finn55, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from AMS7958

    The nurses took report on both patients and prepared the trauma bays for a couple in their 80's who had been T-boned when the husband pulled into an intersection. No current life threatening emergencies were reported. Each patient was assessed and stabilized. A recurring theme was each spouse asking about the other spouse.

    After the hustle and bustled settled down we reassured each patient that their spouse was fine. We opened the curtain separating their rooms and informed them that they were right beside each other and they could talk to one another. They could not see one another because they were secured to backboards and unable to turn their heads to the side but they could hear one another. The wife wanted me to know her husband had a blood pressure problem……oh dear she couldn't remember the name of the medicine he was on. The husband told me how they had been married for 60 years and I could see the sparkle of love in his eyes.

    As time went on and test results returned it was decided that the wife had an injury that required her to be shipped to a Level 1 trauma center. The doctor informed the couple of the care decisions he felt were necessary. I began to see fear and worry in the husband's eyes. That is when I jumped into gear of getting the portable heart monitor. I connected the husband to the monitor and moved his IV pole and bed right beside his wife's bed. I put his left bed rail down and her right bed rail down. I told them that if they just reached out they would be able to feel each other's hands. They reached out and found each other's hands and held on tight.

    They talked and reassured each other it would all be okay. They told each other they loved them. The husband told her as soon as he could find someone to drive him to the other hospital he would be there. The doctor told the wife it would be best if her husband stayed all night for just one night to be observed and make sure he was okay. The husband didn't want to but the wife encouraged him that he could see her tomorrow.

    The helicopter crew came and the beds had to be separated after a final hand squeeze and I love you. The Mrs. was loaded and transported to the other hospital while the husband was admitted for overnight observation.

    The next day I came to work I found out the wife had died that night from her injuries. I was heartbroken for this lovely couple. As I reflected, I was so thankful that I had taken the time to connect the portable equipment and rearrange the beds and allow them to hold hands.

    Many times we are too rushed in the ER to make time for the important things in life. And what was more important at this point in time? To hold hands for the very last time...
    Oh my. Brought tears to my eyes. What a beautiful thing you've done. Seems like so often on AN, we see the opposite thing said, but you, my friend, I would be honored to have care for me or mine.
    1feistymama, finn55, hhendu5, and 1 other like this.
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    Very moving story. I am glad there are nurses like you out there. All too often we experience the opposite of what you described. Bless you.
    finn55 and jalyc RN like this.
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    Quote from bebbercorn
    I was being precepted by a nurse once who got in the face of a surgeon yelling at her to run a pt straight to the OR, in order to let him kiss his wife goodbye. I'll never forget that courage. You probably did more than you know. God Bless you!
    New nurses on here are always asking older ones for advice. The OP and your post are great for letting them know to trust their own instincts and stand up for their patients in those times when no one else does. Even the hardest of doctors, etc will probably soften with the aftermath of these actions.
    1feistymama and bebbercorn like this.
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    How wonderful this couple was able to have this last time together! You where very thoughtful.
    1feistymama, bebbercorn, JustMe54, and 1 other like this.
  6. 0
    oh so touching and inspirational. Thank you for sharing!
  7. 0
    God bless you.
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    I am so proud of nurses. God bless you for your caring hearts. God bless you also on those days when you are so overwhelmed you cannot get to do the "extras" you want to do.
    You have touched my heart -- another caring nurse who gives my former profession a beautiful name.
    Last week an interview was featured on Here and Now -- "Nurses Make ‘Profound’ Connection With Family In Iran"
    Here and Now on National Public Radio had a story about a Marquette, MI hospital where ICU staff cared for a dying injured female & her family in the Middle East.
    Nurses Make ‘Profound’ Connection With Family In Iran | Here & Now
  9. 0
    BEAUTIFUL!!
  10. 1
    Oh My God, Thank you for making me cry like a baby! So touching, and so wonderful that you gave them those last moments together. <3
    1feistymama likes this.


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