Eat Before You Get Here! - page 3

WHY is it that as soon as people step one foot into the ER, they suddenly are overcome with hunger and thirst? Now I can understand if the patient is admitted and has been there all day and has eaten... Read More

  1. by   canoehead
    Good going Zudy Where should we mail your unemployment check?
  2. by   zudy
    Mail it to Burger King, sounds good to me, canoehead.
  3. by   Aneroo
    As a SN working her way thru nursing school by delivering pizza's for the hut, I hate to say we DELIVER to the ED! At Golden Corral yesterday for lunch (mother's day...what a dumb idea for lunch) we were seated next to a family of 10...everyone, including the 8 children, were obese as could be. Lost my appetite, waste of 10 bucks. -A
  4. by   stretch thin
    Oh yes, does it ever. And to top it off, those pt's asking, or let me rephrase that, demanding food are the ones that come with abd pain or n/v. You want to ask them, where's your sign. (Stupid sign that is)
  5. by   GDog7NYC
    Sometimes I'd just like to offer them a cup of "shut the hell up and get out of my ER!". But alas, I never do.
  6. by   Bevi
    Quote from RNin92
    I'm pretty sure it does already!!!
    I mean.... the issue was (IMO)kind of speaking to ppl thinking there is dining services in the ER? Was it a value judgement on ppl who need to rely on state money to help them get care....?
    Does it make a difference? Should we worry bout making value judgements and of painting ppl with a broad brush..? Just wondering.... not trying to get anyones ire up...
  7. by   Bevi
    Quote from Nur_1996
    I think they can use their foodstamps for McDonalds can't they??? Worked in a ER for years, so I can really relate to this post. O.K so am I school nurse now, kids come into the clinic c/o belly ache, then tell me 10 minutes later, I need to go now because its time for lunch! They are starting early! :chuckle

    Wow...... i'm a little startled at this one.
  8. by   veetach
    I believe that somewhere in this society of needy, greedy, demanding people, there is a law that, upon arrival in the ER for that "emergent" sore throat or finger pain, then you must do the following:


    1. ask for a meal. Everyone knows the ER is just like a fancy restaurant and serves the fanciest of gourmet foods.

    2. ask for a drink with that meal, especially if you prefer ginger ale, the ER serves the BEST ginger ale.

    3. demand a blanket. Some time during the next few hours you may need one. But then again maybe not.

    4. Go pee. This is a very serious demand, especially if you are brought in to the ER on a back board from a low speed MVA.

    5. complain that the nurses are laughing. OMG they should NEVER laugh. there are SICK people here. .
  9. by   howie122832
    [QUOTE=oramar]Have noticed people with psycological problems have the worst kind of eating habits.



    I have often wondered this one my self..... And what about the pt that are in sickle cell crisis.... I worked oncology, and we got those pt's on the floor occasionally and they were constantly on the light for sandwiches and snacks between meals ( not to mention their pain meds!) I was changing the linens one day of a sickle cell crisis while she was in the shower, and I swear she had sandwiches, crackers, dinner rolls, and other snacks in her bed!!! She had more food in that bed then I have in my whole kitchen!! :chuckle
  10. by   RNin92
    Quote from Bevi
    I mean.... the issue was (IMO)kind of speaking to ppl thinking there is dining services in the ER? Was it a value judgement on ppl who need to rely on state money to help them get care....?
    Does it make a difference? Should we worry bout making value judgements and of painting ppl with a broad brush..? Just wondering.... not trying to get anyones ire up...
    Relax Bevi...
    Just a little humor...
    Your post is very deep...too deep
  11. by   RNin92
    Quote from veetach
    I believe that somewhere in this society of needy, greedy, demanding people, there is a law that, upon arrival in the ER for that "emergent" sore throat or finger pain, then you must do the following:


    1. ask for a meal. Everyone knows the ER is just like a fancy restaurant and serves the fanciest of gourmet foods.

    2. ask for a drink with that meal, especially if you prefer ginger ale, the ER serves the BEST ginger ale.

    3. demand a blanket. Some time during the next few hours you may need one. But then again maybe not.

    4. Go pee. This is a very serious demand, especially if you are brought in to the ER on a back board from a low speed MVA.

    5. complain that the nurses are laughing. OMG they should NEVER laugh. there are SICK people here. .
    So, I am just wondering...

    Do you think people have some secret source of information that tells them just how to act when they come into the ED with their "emergent sore throats, etc"?
    I mean across the land, they are EXACTLY the same!!!
    What's up with that!!!!!

    Ha Ha Ha
    :chuckle
  12. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from GDog7NYC
    Sometimes I'd just like to offer them a cup of "shut the hell up and get out of my ER!". But alas, I never do.

    Can I borrow a cup of that?
  13. by   TiffyRN
    Not that I blame you guys at all . . .
    But the ER nurses at my previous hospital always promised the patients they would get fed when they got to the floor. Of course most of the admissions came right after shift change since they had been holding during shift change which meant they had missed dinnertime from the cafeteria and the snack shop wouldn't open for another hour and a half. Naturally no one had eaten for two or three weeks before arriving to the floor. And they were supposed to receive the sandwich tray (other items could be purchased by the patient from the snack shop) which was safe for most diets; low sugar, no salt, low fat mayo, low fat dressing for the 3 leaf salad. This didn't please most patients but this is expressed to a girl raised on the theory: "He'll eat it when he's hungry" Course my daddy was talking about the dog but oh well. . .

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