Drug Seeker Antics and Dramas - page 2

They are an everyday event in almost every ER around the country. What is the drug of choice in your area? I've noticed around here it is Vicodin. Our latest little treasure was an ex RN... Read More

  1. by   NewEnglandRN
    I, too, have had to go to the ER twice for a migraine. After suffering for 72 hours in acute pain, I had to go... the Dr was great, but the nurse rolled her eyes (according to my sister who was with me.) I was terribly nauseous and had been vomiting for hours. By the time I got to the ER, I was having dry heaves.

    I am taking Calan as a preventative, but it does not work very well for the migraines (I get them several times a month.) Imitrex is terrible for me... it makes me feel like someone is crushing my throat. I have an Rx for Fiorinal and Compazine. Sometimes is works, sometimes not.

    I realize there are people drug seeking who "use" migraines as an excuse for mediation. But, when you have a migraine for days, it is absolutely terrible.

    I hope if I ever need to go to the ER again, the RN will be compassionate. If you have never experienced a true migraine, you have no idea how unbelievably painful it can be...

    Michelle
  2. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from SWFlorida
    I got a call from a pharmacy one night. A pt presented to the counter with a script for "a pound of mofine" (note spelling) Of course we didn't rx this..... The pharmacist laughed all the way till the cops showed up.
    Oh my gosh....unbelievable....
  3. by   Medic946RN
    Quote from SWFlorida
    I got a call from a pharmacy one night. A pt presented to the counter with a script for "a pound of mofine" (note spelling) Of course we didn't rx this..... The pharmacist laughed all the way till the cops showed up.
    When I was working as paramedic the hospital that was our medical command facility had a clinic and pharmacy on the second floor. One day I come down with conjuntivits from my new contact lenses. I asked one of the Er docs to check my eye, he diagnosed the condition, then wrote me script for bactrim eye drops. I was going to the local pharmacy, he stops me and says, why waste time, just go upstairs. When I got there I witnessed the exact same thing. Some guy had swiped one of the ED doc's pads and had written script for "Mofine, 1 pound." Just as I entered the pharmacy, so did two city cops who kindly asked the gentlemen to come with them. Of course he didn't want to, a scuffle broke out. I ended up helping the cops hold him down while they cuffed him. In that state they frown very deeply on falsify prescriptions the guy ended up with few years out of the deal. And he never got any of his "Mofine"


    But just last month I was working in the ED and answered the phone some guy tells me he's from a local pharmacy and that he has prescription for percocet but he doesn't have the DEA number of our ED doctor on file and would I give it to him! Oh yeah, like that's gonna happen! Thanks for playing and as a parting gift you get an edition of our home game!
  4. by   burger914
    In the ER,I can understand you would get many drug seekers, but in Long Term Care..it's driving me crazy...My facility takes anyone to keep the beds full and I am sick of chasing patients up the street when they decide they need a fix! Mostly what I have seen is herion and crack addiction with some Xanax for good measures. Lovely isn't?
  5. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Medic946RN
    When I was working as paramedic the hospital that was our medical command facility had a clinic and pharmacy on the second floor. One day I come down with conjuntivits from my new contact lenses. I asked one of the Er docs to check my eye, he diagnosed the condition, then wrote me script for bactrim eye drops. I was going to the local pharmacy, he stops me and says, why waste time, just go upstairs. When I got there I witnessed the exact same thing. Some guy had swiped one of the ED doc's pads and had written script for "Mofine, 1 pound." Just as I entered the pharmacy, so did two city cops who kindly asked the gentlemen to come with them. Of course he didn't want to, a scuffle broke out. I ended up helping the cops hold him down while they cuffed him. In that state they frown very deeply on falsify prescriptions the guy ended up with few years out of the deal. And he never got any of his "Mofine"


    But just last month I was working in the ED and answered the phone some guy tells me he's from a local pharmacy and that he has prescription for percocet but he doesn't have the DEA number of our ED doctor on file and would I give it to him! Oh yeah, like that's gonna happen! Thanks for playing and as a parting gift you get an edition of our home game!

    This same story about "mofine, 1 pound" has been going around for years. It is in an Echo Heron book. My ER doc told me it happened in med school. I've heard this story from numerous nurses through the years.

    Urban myth? Old-wives-tale?

    steph
  6. by   RainbowSkye
    Quote from PA-C in Texas
    Of course the addicts won't care for the Stadol NS that you prescribe, but perhaps that will dissuade them from using the ED as their supplier.
    Here in my little ER Stadol nasal spray is quite popular with the abusers. A pharmacotherapeutics instructor once said that anything you can put up your nose can quickly become addictive: cocaine, heroin, Afrin, Stadol nasal spray...
  7. by   BabyRN2Be
    Quote from stevielynn
    This same story about "mofine, 1 pound" has been going around for years. It is in an Echo Heron book. My ER doc told me it happened in med school. I've heard this story from numerous nurses through the years.

    Urban myth? Old-wives-tale?

    steph
    Steph,

    Which Echo Heron book is it in? I do remember one of the books when a pt pronounced morphine, "Mopheen" (or something like that), but it didn't say it was a "pound of mopheen." Just curious, am I missing an Echo Heron book somewhere?? I tell ya, in my summer read mode, a new Echo Heron book would really hit the spot.
  8. by   SWFlorida
    I heard that a lot of those who try to pass phony scripts get basicly a slap on the wrist because their lawyers will put up the defense that their drug addiction drove them to it. They generally has to go to a rehab facility.

    Our ER started using bright red scripts that are difficult to just make a copy of on a scanner.
  9. by   z's playa
    Quote from PA-C in Texas
    I would just like to say a few words about the agonists/antagonists that are available. I have found that they are very effective drugs. If there are migraines that won't respond to the 5-HT agonists, ergotamines, toradol, and either Talwin, Nubain, or Stadol, it is time for a head CT.

    Of course the addicts won't care for the Stadol NS that you prescribe, but perhaps that will dissuade them from using the ED as their supplier.

    Head CTs or not, why does no one want to except that sometimes, nothing will work. Especially around that time of the month. IF the pt comes in more than once a month ,and shows no improvement from previous # of visits...then CT. Most migraines DO respond to triptans and DHE, but there are circumstances that warrent a nod, not a rolling of the eyes.

    PS Not saying you rolled your eyes! Just to all of us in general.
  10. by   unknown99
    In our ER, the only narcs that a Er doc will write a script for are Lomotil and Darvocet. Even at that, they only write it for a max of 8 doses. The seekers don't even hardly come around anymore.
  11. by   teeituptom
    Sorry there are some who are obviously so blatant, that it is being perfectly human To Roll Your Eyes At Them

    While they have all these problems, RSD, FMS, Migraines, All these other chronic pain syndromes Where as some like Pain Management specialists love to make up and foster these labels because its good for there business. Yet their patients always seem to end up in the ER wanting MORE

    While Physicians like ER Docs do tend to take them with a grain of salt, becaause the ER does get abused by these patients all wanting more.

    Might be better if these so called Pain Management specialists would work more than routine office hours.
  12. by   PA-C in Texas
    I believe in adequate pain control. When I send people home with fractures and an appointment to follow up with an orthopedic surgeon (which they will have to drive for a good way to get to), I am not hesitant to write for the Lortab 10. I will light up your world with MS if you come in with ischemic chest pain or fentanyl if you are a major trauma patient.

    However, I can't envision a situation in which I would administer dilaudid, morphine, or any other Schedule II narcotic to a patient with a migraine headache. If it ever comes to that, you better believe that I am going to be on the phone with a neurologist asking if he will accept transfer of the patient.
  13. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from BabyRN2Be
    Steph,

    Which Echo Heron book is it in? I do remember one of the books when a pt pronounced morphine, "Mopheen" (or something like that), but it didn't say it was a "pound of mopheen." Just curious, am I missing an Echo Heron book somewhere?? I tell ya, in my summer read mode, a new Echo Heron book would really hit the spot.
    Ditto, the patient wanted Mofeen(?) for chest pain....to my knowledge there was never an attempt to get a pound of it, though. I think that the poster may be mistaken regarding their source.

    I have had numerous patients pronounce it like that, though.

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