Is this common? The new face of the ED - page 3

by mariposa311 6,970 Views | 37 Comments

I have worked in the ED for 4 years. Anyone who works in an ED knows the current situation with ED care. Too many patients (esp with non-urgent complaints) and we are incredibly understaffed. The turnover is so high, like I said... Read More


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    o btw I am an RN and have been for the last 36 years of my career. I have worked in all types and sizes of hospitals and will tell you that the majority of er nurses are fantastic and I believe the ones complaining may be a very small minority!
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    Quote from GM2RN
    I have worked in the ED almost 4 years and there are many times that I don't get any breaks let alone 30 miutes for lunch. We aren't required to clock out for lunch; the time is automatically deducted and you have to remember to write it in a time book to get paid if you don't get your lunch. Even if I am getting paid when I don't get to take time for lunch, I would rather have the much needed break than the extra few dollars.
    Yep me too, I'd love to have the breaks; however if I don't get to sit down uninterrupted for 30 minutes and eat, I write the edit.
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    Quote from billyboblewis
    Sorry ER nurses. I have worked off and on in ER for many years and it is a much lighter job than working the floors. I am sure there are many times you get plenty of time to eat and someone goes out and picks food up. No one in the nursing field is getting giant raises. Is there some reason you think ER would be singled out?
    Now as a patient on occasion in the ER I can say that I have found nurses and Doctors to be on the lazy side and very disrespectful to patients when they dont see blood and guts or compound fractures or chest pain. So I have a headache and it doesnt go away. The pain is what made me go to er in the middle of the night not an urge to get narcotics. I dont have to hear an RN say you just ran out of your prescription. It is really sad that you can go to an urgent care and get better treatment of staff with less training. So to make things clear I almost lost my life because nurses and doctors in the local er did not diagnose my subdural hematoma with all the standard symptoms and history.. ER people get your act together and treat all patients well.

    Well shucks, sign me up for this amazing ER with the light workload and people going out to buy lunches for everyone's 30 minute breaks! Why am I suffering through saving lives when I could be doing that?
    barrettrn1, Hagabel, nuangel1, and 5 others like this.
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    Quote from billyboblewis
    o btw I am an RN and have been for the last 36 years of my career. I have worked in all types and sizes of hospitals and will tell you that the majority of er nurses are fantastic and I believe the ones complaining may be a very small minority!

    You have the right to your opinion, but that doesn't make your opinion right!
    nursegirl75 likes this.
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    Quote from billyboblewis
    Sorry ER nurses.
    As with many units there are problem nurses but that is no reason to generalize. I assure you that I have been on both ends in my own ER, both as RN and patient, and it can be difficult. I do not know the size of your city but here on an average night 100+ patients in 8 hours was average. I would make it a point to do patient education every time I went into a room. I cannot tell you how many times I arrived at work to find that we were 20 to 30 charts behind overflowing from evenings. I am truly sorry that your subdural was missed, that is why I really liked having treatment protocols in place. Once a RN started a protocol the flow had to be completed - the Doc on that night could not short-cut the path.

    ER's will always be treated as if it is a clinic by many patients and that abuse of the system will have unintended consequences for the truly sick or emergent patients. The ability of the hospital to cover any shortage of nurses in an ER that gets slammed would be not only helpful but it would be safer. Safer for the patients, safer for the nurses but it means the costs of care go up and management is all about keeping the costs down. But despite all the negatives I would have never left the ER - I never burned out but I knew nurses that did and I was glad to see them go.

    (And Yes I am allergic to latex, severely allergic - anaphylaxis level and I cannot have Epi so avoidance is my best option. A hospital can go "latex free" but that does not make it safe for the severely allergic. Short of demolishing the existing buildings and rebuilding with no latex containing products the buildings are already contaminated and therefore unsafe. I have not been to a movie since 2005, cannot go out to eat at a dine in restaurant, cannot buy new furniture, cannot find a safe bathing suit, (just to name a few obstacles) and shopping is a nightmare as my battery for my filter system only lasts for 2 hours and people tend to stare and make rude comments. I am on Social Security disability as a result.)
    GM2RN likes this.
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    Our ER is latex free.
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    @redhead_NURSE98!


    W
    e do not clock out for lunch, they automatically deduct it from our pay, and the two 15 minute breaks? Have never happened.

    @billy bob

    I have no idea what ER you went to. But that is a way overgeneralization. If you came in our ER with a HA that wouldn't go away, first thing we could do is a head CT, before meds or anything. It is our protocol. Doctors and Nurses lazy? I just had to laugh at that.
    nuangel1, TheSquire, and GM2RN like this.
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    as for people coming to ER vs urgent care or clinic, we are just at the fringe of seeing a greater influx of these patients. the flip side, hospitals don't recieve a great amount of reimbursement so staffing may continue to be a nightmare at times. Clinics charge for first visits (even with medicaid), urgent care has a co pay, and some people just don't want to bother making an appointment and further more don't wish to sit in a clinic for an hour so the ER seems to them the answer
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    Quote from mariposa311
    @redhead_NURSE98!


    W
    e do not clock out for lunch, they automatically deduct it from our pay, and the two 15 minute breaks? Have never happened.

    You don't have a manner in which to edit and show that you did not take a lunch?

    You have even better grounds for a fair wage lawsuit, because all of your employees are being shown as taking a lunch when they may not be. Again, the reason companies get away with this is because we let them.
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    Quote from GM2RN
    I have worked in the ED almost 4 years and there are many times that I don't get any breaks let alone 30 miutes for lunch. We aren't required to clock out for lunch; the time is automatically deducted and you have to remember to write it in a time book to get paid if you don't get your lunch. Even if I am getting paid when I don't get to take time for lunch, I would rather have the much needed break than the extra few dollars.
    I work in Dialysis and even if we are not able to take our 30min lunch break, they dock our pay anyways. I have went on break before, clocked out, 15mins later I'm called back to the floor for whatever reason, clock back in, then get called in the office to get grilled because I ONLY clocked out for 15mins...


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