benadryl inj, in anaphylaptic shock?

  1. 0
    tell me everything you knew about it..
    because i never know benadryl inj is exist.

    thank you.

    leesha

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 19 Comments...

  3. 0
    Is this homework?

    And I strongly suggest a drug handbook or an app such as Medscape or Epocrates that allows you to look up drugs including administration, pharmacology, et al. You won't always have AN.com handy to ask what's what.

    In a nutshell: benadryl IV does the same stuff benadryl PO does, except much faster. It can be used for anything from an allergic reaction to anxiety to abdominal pain. It should be diluted and never be pushed any other way than slow (25 mg/min max).
  4. 3
    Quote from brainkandy87
    Is this homework?

    And I strongly suggest a drug handbook or an app such as Medscape or Epocrates that allows you to look up drugs including administration, pharmacology, et al. You won't always have AN.com handy to ask what's what.

    In a nutshell: benadryl IV does the same stuff benadryl PO does, except much faster. It can be used for anything from an allergic reaction to anxiety to abdominal pain. It should be diluted and never be pushed any other way than slow (25 mg/min max).
    Nope,it is not a homework.
    I'm asking this because i never encounter with this drugs before.since I'm a student nurse and been in nursing for 4 year-i never give even saw this drug.I'm asking my colleague about this and he also did not know benadryl injection is do exist.Because in our country Benadryl is in syrup form and always prescribed as a cough mixture.I'm quite sure Inj Benadryl is not practiced in our country.I do search about it before post it here but I want to hear from all of you (nurses all over the world) that had administer and knew this drug like you knew your own palm.Its nice to heard from other experienced.So,I'm posting here at AN-to hear world answer.i hope you got it--i'm not assuming AN as customer service counter or dictionary

    thanx for the info.It means a lot to me even it just a nutshell
    SHGR, pseudomonas, and Esme12 like this.
  5. 1
    Benadryl comes in a variety of forms - liquid, pill, and injectable. In fact, it can easily be obtained as an OTC (over the counter) med in cough syrups and sleeping pills, as well as an allergy med. The injectable is by prescription only, and is used as you are aware, as a something for a major allergic reaction.

    Diphenhydramine is sometimes used as 'pre-med' before giving blood or blood products to certain patients, to avoid a possible reaction.

    Best wishes to you!
    7feetunder likes this.
  6. 0
    It is not a first-choice, first-line med but it exists and sometimes used.
    The problem is, benadryl works really slow comparing with tempo of anaphylaxis. The start of action is expected, under normal circumstances, within 15-20 min., and the patient can die well before this time passes. Also, benadryl, especially given IV, can cause hypotension, doesn't directly treat bronchospasm and its sedative effect may not be desirable.

    I carry benadryl SL pills and SQ auto-injector (the latter thing isn't available in the USA so I buy it in Europe) in my "allergy pack" with total dose 200 mg. I use them only for local and less severe reactions. Paramedics and ER personnel usually inject it later, IV or SQ, but only after blood pressure is under good control.
    Last edit by KatieMI on Sep 11, '12 : Reason: content
  7. 2
    http://www.resus.org.uk/pages/reaction.pdf

    Sign up for medscape......it is free and an excellent resource for you. Your answer to your question lies here.
    Anaphylaxis Treatment & Management......Medscape: Medscape Access

    Anaphylaxis typically presents with many different symptoms over minutes or hours with an average onset of 5 to 30 minutes if exposure is intravenous and 2 hours for foods. The most common areas affected include: skin (8090%), respiratory (70%), gastrointestinal (3045%), heart and vasculature (1045%), and central nervous system (1015%) with usually two or more being involved.
    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction of rapid onset affecting many body systems. It is due to the release of inflammatory mediators and cytokines from mast cells and basophils, typically due to an immunologic reaction but sometimes non-immunologic mechanism.

    Immunologic

    In the immunologic mechanism, immunoglobulin E (IgE) binds to the antigen (the foreign material that provokes the allergic reaction). Antigen-bound IgE then activates FcεRI receptors on mast cells and basophils. This leads to the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine. These mediators subsequently increase the contraction of bronchial smooth muscles, trigger vasodilation, increase the leakage of fluid from blood vessels, and cause heart muscle depression.

    Diagnosis

    Anaphylaxis is diagnosed based on clinical criteria. When any one of the following three occurs within minutes/hours of exposure to an allergen there is a high likelihood of anaphylaxis:


    1. Involvement of the skin or mucosal tissue plus either respiratory difficulty or a low blood pressure
    2. Two or more of the following symptoms:- a. Involvement of the skin or mucos membranes and. Respiratory difficulties. Low blood pressure
      d. Gastrointestinal symptoms
    3. Low blood pressure after exposure to a known allergen

    During an attack, blood tests for tryptase or histamine (released from mast cells) might be useful in diagnosing anaphylaxis due to insect stings or medications. However these tests are of limited utility if the cause is food or if the person has a normal blood pressure, and they are not specific for the diagnosis.
    Due to the release of these histamines and vasodilitation the drugs of choice are Benadryl IV, epinephrine SQ, and Zantac/Ranidiatine IV are given. The benadry is an anti-histamine and the Ranidatine is a histamine blocker and the epinephrine as a vasoconstrictor and broncho-dilator.

    I hope this helps.
    7feetunder and merlee like this.
  8. 2
    I do not carry injectable benadryl, but know I was given it after my c- section.

    We use benadryl for my son's allergies, and his care program indicates even with severe reactions, if he is able to swallow, give benadryl first to start the medication working. Obviously if his throat is already closed he will receive his epi pen, but the epinepherine does not stop the reaction. It merely opens the airway An antihisthamine is needed to stop the reaction. So, when at all possible, benadryl immediately. It can start to work hopefully before the epi wears off.
    7feetunder and merlee like this.
  9. 0
    Quote from brainkandy87
    Is this homework?

    And I strongly suggest a drug handbook or an app such as Medscape or Epocrates that allows you to look up drugs including administration, pharmacology, et al. You won't always have AN.com handy to ask what's what.

    In a nutshell: benadryl IV does the same stuff benadryl PO does, except much faster. It can be used for anything from an allergic reaction to anxiety to abdominal pain. It should be diluted and never be pushed any other way than slow (25 mg/min max).
    ^ This.

    Really. OP never heard of diphenhydramine injectable?

    It can also work like an antiemetic too--though there are better ones out there.


    I like LexiComp, but I think it ended up being more expensive than Epocrates.
  10. 0
    Quote from LCinTraining
    I do not carry injectable benadryl, but know I was given it after my c- section.

    We use benadryl for my son's allergies, and his care program indicates even with severe reactions, if he is able to swallow, give benadryl first to start the medication working. Obviously if his throat is already closed he will receive his epi pen, but the epinepherine does not stop the reaction. It merely opens the airway An antihisthamine is needed to stop the reaction. So, when at all possible, benadryl immediately. It can start to work hopefully before the epi wears off.
    ^ This too.
  11. 0
    Quote from samadams8
    ^ This.

    Really. OP never heard of diphenhydramine injectable?
    I didn't until I started nursing school...and even then, I didn't actually encounter the IM version until I started working. Also, depending on the country that he/she lives in, it may not be used in lieu of other medications.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top