Are all floor nurses rude to ER nurses? - page 5

Hello everyone, I have been an RN for about 3 years (1yr med/surg; 2 yrs cardiac) I just started working ER about 3 weeks ago, and I just have a quick question. Are alot of floor nurses rude and... Read More

  1. by   darius000
    I have been an ED nurse for 10 years. My worst experiences are taking patients to ICU, some of the Nurses just don't want to talk or know you. I worked for awhile in after hours management and did my best to educate ward (or floor nurses) as to why it was important to move patients out of ED ASAP. Now in ED I do my best not to send patients close to handover or shift change unless we are really clogged up(which is all too often). During the day we now have what we call the Emergency Department Transfer Coordinator or EDTC. It is his or her job to liaise with the wards in regards not only getting patients out of ED but also getting patients out of the wards to make room. But i think the biggest problem is the lack of understanding between the work load. There is fault on both sides and communication is important here. Oh and if I got offered $10 to keep a patient until after shift change I could probably make an extra $400 per shift....
  2. by   Roy Fokker
    I cringe sometimes when I hear some of my co-workers - the ones who have never worked on a floor - bad mouth floor nurses and call them everything from "lazy" to "incompetent". I feel bad when I hear floor nurses dismiss ED nurses as inconsiderate jerks who don't care what happens on the floors.

    Every time a feud like this erupts, I'm tempted to tell the parties involved to "walk a mile in the other person's shoes before castigating them"... but I shut up before I begin.

    Why? Because I think it's a waste of time!

    I figure that if you're old enough and a so called "adult" but yet behave like a petulant, pouting child - then no amount of words or wisdom is going to get through to you.

    My parents raised me to be considerate towards others. I can't imagine doing some of the things y'all just listed - whatever happened to honesty and basic courtesy?

    When I worked the floor, I'd tell ER - "I'm really slammed right now. I promise I'll call back in 15 minutes". Baring any un-forseen predicament (pt. fell, code etc) I kept my word. Now when I work ER, I try to be considerate to the floor. Usually they ask for 10-15 minutes and I oblige. I try not to be overtly pushy unless we're drowning (some weekdays we easily see over 300 patients a day).

    The way I see it: Floor nurse or trauma junkie - we both got a job to do. An admission or a transfer is going to throw a money wrench into the works - but it's nobody's "fault". Griping and grousing and stalling don't help - they only make an already hard task that much more harder.


    cheers,
  3. by   nuangel1
    roy well said.i too have been both.i have seen it from both sides also.we all are there for the pt's .there is no need to be rude too eachother ever.
  4. by   northshore08
    It's a great thing when nurses work together to see these situations from both sides, and I am all for working together. Whenever I have the chance to work with staff from other departments, I get to know other nurses and when I call their floor we can relate to each other. Often they call for help with IVs or such, and if I have questions about floor stuff that I am not familiar with, they are helpful. Codes go smoother because we know each other and I feel like we work together better. They know that I am not a floor nurse and they tell me that they could not work in the ED.

    But evidently not everyone thinks this way, and the pt suffers on that skinny stretcher mattress while the staff argues. So I think you need to be discerning when it comes to staff members that avoid report. If the bed is not clean, call the house supervisor to see if the stat clean has really been called, and the supervisor will immediately know you are having trouble getting the pt to their assigned bed. Be resourceful and ask to give report to the charge nurse if the staff nurse is unavailable, or if the nurse says "Hey, I didn't know I was getting a patient!" Then you have notified the charge nurse that you are having a problem. Occasionally this has resulted in the immediate availability of the assigned nurse.

    (These steps only take a few minutes, and you are already waiting 30 min or more to give your report.)

    I know each hospital has different systems and bed control methods; adapt these ideas prn!

    My favorite method would be the "fax and take up in 30 minutes" method listed before.
  5. by   TraumaNurseRN
    Quote from bluesky
    I just switched to ER nursing about 3 mos ago. When I take patients to the ICU I don't take any crap from the occasional jerk... as I was myself an ICU nurse for 4 yrs and know exactly how to outgame them. It's pretty fun, actually.

    I know the ICU nurses are exactly the way you described.....just adds fuel to the fire.......
  6. by   alkaleidi
    Working at both a level 2 trauma center in a large city (PRN now) and at the only hospital in a very large rural county, it is the same story at both. Fortunately for me, BOTH hospitals have a policy of no-delay report. If the receiving nurse is not available, the lead/charge is expected to take report. Unless there is a crisis on the floor (i.e. respiratory/cardiac arrest), report is taken when the call is made from the ER. No exceptions. Of course, floor nurses are hostile at times but for the most part OK (I'm sure some complaining goes on after the phone call ends, but whatever!).

    This policy is expected to be upheld even at shift change when nurses are either (a) giving report or (b) recording report. It's much easier to pause a tape recorder for LITERALLY 1-2 minutes than tell an ambulance to hang out because you don't have a bed for them and their patient that is coding will just have to wait!

    I really REALLY don't understand why people on the floors (med-surg OR ICU) get bent out of shape -- report does NOT take 20 minutes, it takes a matter of 1-5 minutes. The same amount of time it takes you to urinate. You wouldn't wait 20-30 minutes to pee if you needed to go RIGHT THEN, so why put off report when it's a short simple process? I have worked med-surg-peds. Going from one to another, I really don't get what the big deal is.
  7. by   bluesky
    Quote from TraumaNurseRN
    I know the ICU nurses are exactly the way you described.....just adds fuel to the fire.......
    Well you know, I'm not talking about all nurses... just ICU at my current facility. First, they don't have to take stepdowns, so when I'm calling_ they only have one other sick patient. Secondly, they have 30 free minutes from the time I fax the SBAR (written report) before I am allowed to call or bring up the pt.

    When I was working SICU, the OR called telling me they'd be here in 5 minutes (the bed was already down there) and I had to get ready,accommodate, and maybe get a half arsed report from the CRNA who brought the pt on arrival.

    Just last week I sat on a DKA pt on an insulin gtt for 2 hrs before her highness was ready. Well, when I delivered the pt the RN tried to claim that one of her IV's was infiltrated, and then asked me a million questions that she would have known the answers to had she actually read the SBAR... such as about her urinary output, etc. She made a huge deal out of the IV although it wasn't red, swollen, cool but it probably was on it's way out. Well I was pretty peeved about her whining, so I left without my monitor. When I came back 15 minutes later to get my monitor, the IV was still in place, arm not elevated or warm compressed. Now the monitor showed her pressure to be like 70's/40's which I found pretty odd because she had been solid 160s in the ED (now I will say she was at great risk of getting septic because her foot was rotting off... and she was tachy but afebrile). But she was mentating well. Well these girls were all bent calling the intensivist, getting their boluses ready and giving me the evil eye. I then quietly noticed that the NIBP was loose and not properly placed. When I re-took the pressure with the proper fit much to the dismay and protest of chickypooRN, the pt's pressure suddenly perked right back up to the 160's without any bolus or pressor yet. All she could muster was "well she must have perked up". Mwaaahahahahahah!

    My charge nurse said I should have invited them over for an inservice on NIBP use but I didn't have the presence at the time!
  8. by   Abigail25
    I just don't get it. When I call the floor, I got out of my way to be friendly, courteous and treat the unit secretary and the receiving RN the way I would want to be treated. When I get to the floor, I greet, smile and ask how their night is going. They still treat me like crap. They barely speak, won't help transfer the patient from the stretcher to bed and won't acknowledge me when I hand the chart off. *** is that all about? You would think they would want to help transfer the patient from the stretcher to the bed...perfect time to assess their skin without having to turn them without help.
    I get that we = work but come on, the poor attitude doesn't change the situation at all. It only makes it worse.
  9. by   northshore08
    Quote from bluesky
    Well these girls were all bent calling the intensivist, getting their boluses ready and giving me the evil eye. I then quietly noticed that the NIBP was loose and not properly placed. When I re-took the pressure with the proper fit much to the dismay and protest of chickypooRN, the pt's pressure suddenly perked right back up to the 160's without any bolus or pressor yet. All she could muster was "well she must have perked up". Mwaaahahahahahah!

    My charge nurse said I should have invited them over for an inservice on NIBP use but I didn't have the presence at the time!

    LOVE IT!!!
    (it's the little things that count.....)
  10. by   traumaokc
    I have worked in the emergency room for over 6 years and this has always been a problem. I came from ICU and cannot ever remember telling anyone in the er that I could not take there pt. It did not matter what was going on in the unit. But once I hit the ER I had a better respect for what they really do everyday. I have always tried to be polite when calling report but when they tell you sorry that nurse is at lunch can you call back in 30 minutes? I didnt have lunch and I am still doing my job. I will never understand why the friction is so bad between ER and every other area of the hospital except for OR. No one realizes we are all trying to do the same thing, take care of patients the best we can, and if I have a bed assignment for someone that has been on a stretcher for hours, its time for them to get upstairs. One of my favorites is when you receive your bed assignment and you try to call report, the bed has changed and oh that one isnt ready yet? Who comes up with stuff. I have actually taken a pt to the icu and given bedside report because I was tired of the bed changing, or you have to wait until shift change or whatever the excuse is... ER is a whole different world.
  11. by   NurseDiva76
    Quote from Abigail25
    I just don't get it. When I call the floor, I got out of my way to be friendly, courteous and treat the unit secretary and the receiving RN the way I would want to be treated. When I get to the floor, I greet, smile and ask how their night is going. They still treat me like crap. They barely speak, won't help transfer the patient from the stretcher to bed and won't acknowledge me when I hand the chart off. *** is that all about? You would think they would want to help transfer the patient from the stretcher to the bed...perfect time to assess their skin without having to turn them without help.
    I get that we = work but come on, the poor attitude doesn't change the situation at all. It only makes it worse.

    This is my pet peeve! One floor where I work is notorious for this.

    I don't give a flying crap if they're rude to me when I bring the patient up, I'm a big girl and will get over it. I just smile and bounce around and tell them how lucky they are that I chose to grace them with my presence and bring them a delightful patient for admission.

    But when they're acting like whiny brats and making their snippy comments in front of the patient is when I blow my top! I actually had a sweet little old lady ask me one time if her nurse was mad at HER!!! I rolled her into her room while three nurses and two techs sat scowling and huffing and sighing loudly at the desk, AFTER I had asked for lifting help not once, but twice. She looked up at me and said, "Oh, dear, I hope I'm not going to be any trouble for them."

    Or, this classic that I hear ALL the time: As soon as I get off the elevator with a patient, I hear, "Oh, Good Lord...ANOTHER one? We're closed. You've already been up here too many times. We're not taking anymore patients tonight." They may be joking, but the patient doesn't give a ****. They're sick and don't need to hear it.
  12. by   firecoins
    ER nurses take it on EMS workers.
  13. by   NurseDiva76
    Quote from firecoins
    ER nurses take it out on EMS workers.
    Yep. It's the circle of life.

    Then the EMS workers go home and kick their dog.


    HAHAHA! Just kidding. But it's true. I've seen it. As soon as we hear "MFD #5 to XYZ Hospital" on the radio, a collective groan goes up, no one wants to get the call, and eventually someone hits the button and snarls at the poor unsuspecting paramedic.

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