What do you prefer to be called?

  1. For those of you who have a DNP, do you prefer to be referred to as Doctor? Do patients or MDs call you Dr. when speaking to you or about you? I feel that once an individual has a doctorate degree, they can be called a doctor.
    •  
  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   MGMR
    In a clinical setting (unlike in academia), calling yourself Dr. ___ is misleading to the general public - or anyone for that matter. Unless you are a physician (MD/DO), it isn't appropriate to address yourself as Doctor because it is assumed that you are a physician. There are RNs working at the bedside with DNPs, should they introduce themselves as Doctor ____ to their patient, even though they are working as a bedside nurse? There are OTs and PTs with doctorates, what about them?
  4. by   JellyDonut
    If you teach Dr is appropriate in the school setting or if you want to make a reservation and you feel like being a bit full of yourself. However, in patient care settings the Dr designation should remain with the physician. They are the leader of the healthcare team and for DNP/DPT to introduce themselves that way only serves to confuse the patient.
  5. by   prelift
    anybody with a Dr. title in academics can be called doctor if they want, not sure why people would care to besides ego reasons.

    But in clinic, only physicians should be called doctor, otherwise it is misleading.

    Why does this matter if you are not an NP yet again? But hey what do we expect we get one of these every few months wanting everybody and their dog to call them doctor nurse.
  6. by   Bluebolt
    In a teaching or academic setting it's innapropriate to not refer to them as Dr. "Blank". I don't know of any nurses with a clinical doctorate who commonly introduce themselves as Dr. "Blank" in hospital settings. In fact if I run into my professors at the grocery store, gym, church and call them Dr. "Blank" in front of others they seem uncomfortable by the formal title. I think nurses who work many years towards their doctorate don't cling to the title to validate them like some other professions may.

    As more and more clinicians obtian doctorates in healthcare the common title usage may change in the future. I expect if many people start using the title it will just require a few words after it explaining, "I'm Dr. Smith, your physician"; "I'm Dr. Jones, your nurse practitioner"; "I'm Dr. Wright, your dentist" etc.
  7. by   meanmaryjean
    I only make my kids call me Doctor. True story.
  8. by   DizzyJon
    As everyone else has stated, I don't use the title of doctor in clinical practice. I am damn proud of my doctorate degree, but I'm not a physician. I have my degree credentials on my email signature and my ID badge. If someone sees it and asks what it means, then I am happy to discuss, but most people don't care. When I had just a master's degree. I would jokingly tell patients that wanted to call me Dr. dizzyjon they could refer to me as Master Dizzyjon if they prefer.
  9. by   llg
    I have a PhD, not a DNP -- but I work in a hospital most of the time. I generally don't use the title "Doctor" because it adds unnecessary confusion and complicates interactions. But I have no big objection to the title, either. If I am being introduced to speak at an educational event, etc. and my credentials are on the presentation screen, the agenda, etc. I don't mind being called "Doctor." In fact, I appreciate it being acknowledged when the circumstances are appropriate for it.

    In some circumstances, it seems appropriate. In most circumstances, it seems to cause awkwardness and/or confusion -- so I let it go without a thought. No big deal.
  10. by   ElvishDNP
    Academically? Call me Doctor. I worked hard for my title and I'm gonna use it.
    At the bedside? People call me by my first name, like they always have.
    I'm lucky to work in a place where we're on a first name basis w/ most of our physicians as well.
  11. by   zedillo85
    Quote from JellyDonut
    If you teach Dr is appropriate in the school setting or if you want to make a reservation and you feel like being a bit full of yourself. However, in patient care settings the Dr designation should remain with the physician. They are the leader of the healthcare team and for DNP/DPT to introduce themselves that way only serves to confuse the patient.
    I think it's appropriate for them to refer themselves as doctors as long as they specify that they are nurse practitioners i.e. 'I am Dr X, your nurse practitioner.'

    It's up to the staff to call DNP doctor. Almost all of them won't. Don't expect physicians (MD/DO) to call DNP doctors. I have not seen them and other staff do it...
  12. by   mmc51264
    That is why I want my DNP, so I make my kids call me Dr Mommy. JK, oldest will have his doctorate pretty quickly.
    I agree with others: Dr ____ for academia and not for bedside. Although a friend said she will use the Dr if it helps get a dinner reservation, etc.
  13. by   Jules A
    Quote from zedillo85
    I think it's appropriate for them to refer themselves as doctors as long as they specify that they are nurse practitioners i.e. 'I am Dr X, your nurse practitioner.'

    It's up to the staff to call DNP doctor. Almost all of them won't. Don't expect physicians (MD/DO) to call DNP doctors. I have not seen them and other staff do it...
    The problem with "I'm Dr. so and so: your NP" is that it won't get said every time someone calls their self "Dr", people only hear and retain a minimum amount of conversation and regardless it does lead to confusion.

    My guess is we will see more hospitals creating policies about this in the future. Not only for nurses but PT, OT, janitors etc. it seems every genre now has a doctorate of something. Some hospitals already don't allow anyone other than a MD or DO use the Dr. title.
  14. by   zedillo85
    Well, if you have earned it, why not use it...
    Last edit by zedillo85 on Jul 8

close