Is getting your DNP worth it? - page 3

So I plan on getting my masters to become a nurse practitioner. After that I was thinking of following it up and earning my DNP. Is it worth it? Do DNPs have the title "Dr." I.e. " Dr. name FNP DNP"... Read More

  1. by   adammRN
    Setting all the digressions aside...

    It is completely worth it if you look at it from a wholistic perspective (ahhh nursing education); education is an investment in yourself and your future. It's something that is one of the core components of living a fullfilling life. It is terrible that tuitions are getting absurd, but when it comes to the need for providers, the ability to find a specialty that suits you and help those in need all while making a decent living, you can't go wrong if you can spend the little time and money now.

    Education works only one way, and that way is opening opportunity. You can always go back to the bedside if your heart pulls you that way, but I am sure there is a way you can fulfill that want with a doctorate. Part of my problem, and I'm sure many others is thinking outside the box. I am typically a very cut and dry thinker, but there are so many ways that you couldn't imagine to put your skills to use no matter what they are in BSN, DNP or certificate in wound care.

    I battled with myself for a long time about going back to get my doctorate, and it is with the above I can say 100% I am going to do it and stop thikning too much about it the "what ifs" in my brain that give me anxiety and doubt about doing it.

    You can probably guess I'm choosing the DNP Psych track
    Last edit by adammRN on Sep 20
  2. by   MsXmas1
    Quote from offlabel
    If a good deal is what you're after, a DNP has nothing to do with it. My partner has a BSN and certificate in anesthesia, works 20-30 hours a week and has 15 weeks a year off and takes >200K. And there are better deals than that...
    Where (city, state) does your partner work?
  3. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from MsXmas1
    Where (city, state) does your partner work?
    The devil is in the details
  4. by   nursetony9
    I'm currently enrolled in a BSN-DNP Adult and Gero program and have four semesters remaining. If I were to do it all over again, I wouldn't. I would stick with an MSN level NP program. Why? My reasoning for becoming an NP is to be a clinician; with more in-depth knowledge of physiology and pathophysiology, health, and disease. Unfortunately, that experience is not within the foundations of DNP education. In my opinion, the DNP is a degree that pushes people into leadership positions and academia. If you are like me, someone who wants to see patients, a few days a week at most, maintaining a sense of life outside of nursing/healthcare; well, the DNP is NOT for you. I have spent way too much time, energy, and money for the DNP to have a return investment in my career solely as a clinician. I don't live and breath nursing and value life far too much than pushing the daily grind of full-time work. I am fortunate that I don't have to work fulltime, but with that said, the DNP is not for everyone. Sadly, the DNP has become the terminal educational pathway for APRNs, and I can't help but notice the similarities of academia and Ponzi-schemes. The DNP does not deliver on the promises it attempts to represent. The DNP should remain an optional platform for nursing seeking advanced education beyond a masters degree.
  5. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from nursetony9
    I'm currently enrolled in a BSN-DNP Adult and Gero program and have four semesters remaining. If I were to do it all over again, I wouldn't. I would stick with an MSN level NP program. Why? My reasoning for becoming an NP is to be a clinician; with more in-depth knowledge of physiology and pathophysiology, health, and disease. Unfortunately, that experience is not within the foundations of DNP education. In my opinion, the DNP is a degree that pushes people into leadership positions and academia. If you are like me, someone who wants to see patients, a few days a week at most, maintaining a sense of life outside of nursing/healthcare; well, the DNP is NOT for you. I have spent way too much time, energy, and money for the DNP to have a return investment in my career solely as a clinician. I don't live and breath nursing and value life far too much than pushing the daily grind of full-time work. I am fortunate that I don't have to work fulltime, but with that said, the DNP is not for everyone. Sadly, the DNP has become the terminal educational pathway for APRNs, and I can't help but notice the similarities of academia and Ponzi-schemes. The DNP does not deliver on the promises it attempts to represent. The DNP should remain an optional platform for nursing seeking advanced education beyond a masters degree.
    I hear similar complaints from MSN NP programs too. That the programs don't prepare the NP students enough for graduation.

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