Your opinion of the DNP - page 2

by kayceeACNP 5,031 Views | 16 Comments

I happened to be on my alma mater's website, and I noticed that they have completely gotten rid of all of their MSN level Nurse Practitioner programs and have turned them into a DNP. I'm assuming this is because of the... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from LiLoRN
    2. If you are an MSN prepared NP are you pursuing or considering pursuing a DNP? If yes, why?
    At this point in my career, absolutely not. I am swimming in financial aid debt and am looking forward to working as an NP. I just can't fathom paying for more schooling that will not increase my salary or my chances of finding a job. Maybe down the road I will consider it. I will, however, strongly consider getting my post-master's in another specialty.
    Would you consider it if the DNP were free? I only ask because my hospital is part of a university so I get free tuition. Or would you not because, like you said, it's largely irrelevant to those who just wish to be nurses (not management, education, etc) and it doesn't increase your salary, responsibilities, and job chances.
  2. 0
    Hmmmm...free would definately make me think more about it. But if I'm getting a free education, I'd probably enroll in a post-master's program that actually could get me a different job/pay scale....That's an interesting question though and if I ever had that opportunity I would really have to consider it.
  3. 4
    I think they are jumping the shark with the DNP requirements.
    They are going to find that once this new healthcare law takes effect and doctors are leaving private practices the need for Advanced Mid-Levels are going to go ever higher.

    We'll see, but I think this DNP by 2015 business is hogwash.
    PMFB-RN, kayceeACNP, LiLoRN, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    "If you are an MSN prepared NP are you pursuing or considering pursuing a DNP? If yes, why?"

    With my current student loan burden and my position as an intensivist APRN locked down, there is no way I would go back to complete my DNP. I think grandfathering us all in would be a much easier, and cost effective route for us.
  5. 2
    none of the schools in indiana (at least none that i am aware of) even have a direct entry dnp yet. most of them have either recently came up with post-masters dnp programs or are planning to add them.
    the dnp is just another example of degree inflation… plain and simple. the aacn said as much in their position statement. they cite “other professions” terminal degrees as examples and say that nursing needs parity with them… pt, ot, phamd, etc. for some reason americans think it takes a doctorate to be a professional. look at most of europe… to be a physician you do one year of prereqs and then do a 4-5 year bachelors of medicine degree. it’s the same deal for lawyers and pharmacists (or chemists as they call them). you really don’t need 4 undergraduate years (usually with little to do with your profession except for learning the basics) to get a foundation for some of these professions. ironically nursing is probably the only example where a undergraduate foundation (in nursing) would be helpful.
    PMFB-RN and foreverLaur like this.
  6. 0
    I think Valparaiso University in Indiana has a BSN to DNP program.


    Quote from hoosier guy
    none of the schools in indiana (at least none that i am aware of) even have a direct entry dnp yet. most of them have either recently came up with post-masters dnp programs or are planning to add them.
    the dnp is just another example of degree inflation… plain and simple. the aacn said as much in their position statement. they cite “other professions” terminal degrees as examples and say that nursing needs parity with them… pt, ot, phamd, etc. for some reason americans think it takes a doctorate to be a professional. look at most of europe… to be a physician you do one year of prereqs and then do a 4-5 year bachelors of medicine degree. it’s the same deal for lawyers and pharmacists (or chemists as they call them). you really don’t need 4 undergraduate years (usually with little to do with your profession except for learning the basics) to get a foundation for some of these professions. ironically nursing is probably the only example where a undergraduate foundation (in nursing) would be helpful.
  7. 0
    Quote from Aymese
    I think Valparaiso University in Indiana has a BSN to DNP program.
    I believe so does Purdue and IUPUI


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