DNP Category?

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    DNP student here! With all the debate going on in the NP category over the viability, sensibility, training and etc... of the DNP program, doesn't it seem like time there is a DNP category, maybe under the "advanced practice" section? I'll always be an NP but I think there will be some issues that will be snoozers for NP's that DNP's might want to discuss, and vice-versa?
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    thank you for representing as a dnp!! there has been alot of negative feedback about that degree. what made you pursue? i was a biology major undergrad. currently pursuing my mph. interested in the cnl --> dnp route. what do you think?
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    Hi
    Does cnl mean clinicial nurse leader? I'm not sure that term. The DNP programs vary quite a bit, some have a clinical component, for others its optional as are other optional areas such as education. So I would think it would depend on what you want to do with your education, and also gaining the appropriate clinical content at some stage in your career!
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    Considering how much time is spent talking "about" the DNP, and how little is done "by" the DNP, I think it would be great to get some discussion going about what's going on with the profession.

    And yes, you'll have to deal with some old topics brought in from "outside", but it's unavoidable (and happens in the forums anyhow, even with a dedicated "sticky" thread for such things).

    Maybe start with a thread (like this), and see if it develops enough interest to justifiy a new sub-forum.
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    We already have a sub-forum for the DNP student here: http://allnurses.com/post-graduate-nursing/

    One question I do have is, once one has the DNP and practices as NP (APN) just like the MSN-prepared NP, what issues would be different between the MSN/DNP degrees?
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    Thats a good question! I think what is changing for me is my overall outlook on healthcare, research and how to integrate it into practice, leadership and such. So...does it make one a better clinician? That's debatable (as seen in the forums here!) Some DNP programs do offer more clinical, so its a little early in the game to see where this is going. I do think I will practice differently: instead of just digesting the tried and true treatments taught in my clinicals, I would step out, look at the research more carefully and function more independently, not just because I was emulating an APRN role taught to me. Bring the best forward and know how to add to it.
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    Quote from Smitty08
    instead of just digesting the tried and true treatments taught in my clinicals, I would step out, look at the research more carefully and function more independently, not just because I was emulating an APRN role taught to me. Bring the best forward and know how to add to it.
    Not to be argumentative, but that's what my MSN program emphasized ...
    sirI likes this.
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    I think the DNP gives more education, networking and planning for those NPs who are looking to start their own practice. This develops confidence and stimulates ideas. There are many MSN NP's practicing and some have started their own practice, but working on a capstone project as part of a DNP degree empowers NPs to start looking at ways in which NPs can effect change in many of the areas of practice. Some are helping to write laws, some are opening up practices in unconventional ways (like starting a practice visiting clients in nursing homes), supermarkets, schools etc. Many MSN prepared NPs can do these things but I think the degree helps invigorate those who want to do these things and it gives them more tools to get the job done.
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    Thank you for representing. I'm starting the BSN to DNP program next week... I'll let you know how to goes....
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    I'm applying to programs right now...I think the true "difference" will be ultimately in the expansion of the NP as community/ national healthcare advocate. The curricula that I have seen emphasize health care systems, economics, etc. Yes, I did receive that information in my MSN program as well. And the argument is that PTs, pharmacists, etc. already are coming prepared with a doctorate, let's get nursing on board as a profession as well. By 2015 AACN recommends the DNP as entry into practice for NPs. Not to worry, MSNs will be grandfathered in. But honestly, most of us did as much work in our MSN programs as most PT/OT/ other allied health professionals do to get a doctorate, let's be recognized for it. Just my $0.02.


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