Deciding on a NP program

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    Well, now that I finally have a job as an RN it's time to research the continuation of my career. I had always planned on continuing on to NP though 15 years ago I had no idea exactly what I wanted to do. I bounced between the idea of getting both NP and CNM, but I find I want to work with children. That being said I don't want to pigeon hole myself into a narrow specialty, which is why I'm wanting FNP. I can always get extra training or even a post-master's certificate in peds.

    My trouble is picking which school. I can go to the school I competed my BSN with, but will have to wait until next year to apply. I am also researching Frontier Nursing University and Western Kentucky University. Both have the BSN to DNP option, my alma mater does not yet. I know I want to state rather local, meaning within my home state as if I do manage to do this I want to participate in commencement (yeah I know, not a big deal to some but for me it is). All three schools are pretty good, though Frontier's classes are all online.

    So I guess my dilema is online vs blended vs in person classes.

    Thanks for allowing me to think out loud. Insights?
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  4. 0
    Visit all of the schools you are considering and meet the faculty. Ask them what their passions are, what do they research? Do you share their interests? Do they inspire you? Apply to several schools. Of those that accept you, attend that which feels like the best fit.

    Good luck.
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    Thanks, I hadn't thought of that. I plan on visiting one this month, the other I might have to wait a little longer as it's a bit farther away.
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    Well, I visited one school and the feedback I got was not what I expected. I was basically told that because of my age getting a MSN-NP would be my best bet and unless I plan on teaching not to bother with the DNP as the certification exam is still open to MSN prepared NP's. I honestly never thought anyone would tell me not to go the DNP route because of my age. She did say ultimately the decision was mine of course, but that she strongly recommended the MSN route because it's quicker for me.

    I still plan on getting the DNP regardless of whether I do it as a post-MSN or BSN to DNP, so the advice pretty much cleared that school from my list.
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    Wow, Wildcat, how old are you? I wouldn't expect to hear that from an educator.
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    Quote from WildcatFanRN
    Well, I visited one school and the feedback I got was not what I expected. I was basically told that because of my age getting a MSN-NP would be my best bet and unless I plan on teaching not to bother with the DNP as the certification exam is still open to MSN prepared NP's. I honestly never thought anyone would tell me not to go the DNP route because of my age. She did say ultimately the decision was mine of course, but that she strongly recommended the MSN route because it's quicker for me.

    I still plan on getting the DNP regardless of whether I do it as a post-MSN or BSN to DNP, so the advice pretty much cleared that school from my list.
    I don't think it was typical age discrimination.
    Being younger your usually encouraged to take more risks and the longer but slightly more rewards for much later in life. Such as taking more risks on 401k when younger.
  9. 0
    Congrats on furthering your education. I have been thinking about it too, but I am currently moving closer to a large city with the hopes of securing a decent nursing job that keeps my soul and sanity happy (well for the most part anyway).
  10. 0
    Waking up my old thread LOL.

    I'm 40 now with a year of Cardiac TCU under my belt. I still really want to work with infants/kids, but have not been able to get a position with the kiddos as of yet.

    FNP or ACNP is the question, one will definately require me to take the GRE. I'm going to apply to my BSN alma mater, Frontier, and EKU. Two other possibilities is Graceland University and Vanderbilt. Only one of those choices has ACNP. I want the option of being able to work in the hospital as an NP and after talking with some I found out FNP can't work in a hospital setting.

    So many choices, so many applications. I'm running up on application deadlines also so, I need to make up my gosh darn mind.
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    Funny, I get orders from several FNPs in my ER on a regular basis, and I'm fairly sure that were still in the hospital

    I also know several hospitalists who are FNPs in the local area.

    Of course I sit here in one state (NM) and you sit in another (I'm guessing KY), so there may be some difference to what is practiced in your state vs mine, but the blanket statement that FNPs can't work in hospital settings is not true, at least, not here.
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    I'm wondering if the new NP I was talking to meant that FNP can't work IN the hospital as a NP. As a PCP they would of course be giving telephone orders when they are on call. At my facility the NP's we actually see in the hospital are the ones working with the one Cardiology group that uses them and the Pulmonary group. I honestly haven't gotten to ask the Pulmonary NP's if they are ACNP or FNP, but since a good portion of they patients they see are in the ICU I would guess they are acute care.


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