Clarification on the DNP requirement of 2015 - page 2

Hi- I'm a bit confused about the whole 2015 DNP requirement for APRNs. Does this mean a DNP, instead an MSN, is required in order to become a Nurse Practitioner starting 2015? Is this applied uniformly in all States or do... Read More

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    There are still plenty of MSN programs out there, including at many top nursing schools. I wouldn't worry about the DNP just yet.
    PatMac10,RN, MichiganRNk8, and ktliz like this.

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    I TOTALLY agree with NPluvsalsa! GREAT IDEA!!!! I will get a DNP when they require a PA to get a doctorate also! Why the heck not? They pay PA in general more than NP anyway, and we do the same work! This whole 2015 DNP push is crazy. It is a way for schools to make more money. It doesn't provide the NP with more money, in fact pay is decreasing steadily for NPs across the nation. Nursing said in 1996 when I got my BSN that BSN would be the entry point for RNs. States can't agree on nationally equal nurse practice acts, what on earth makes you think they will enforce this?! Of course there will be a grandfathering in of MSN prepared ARNPs - that would be healthcare suicide if they did not. No, save your money unless you just want to do it for your own satisfaction. Let me add, also, that the medical doctors / profession do not own the scholarly title of doctor. By goodness, if I spent the time and money getting a DNP, you will call me doctor
    JKCharles likes this.
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    well... since nursing "government" has decided that the dnp should be the entry for practice... the dnp is being pushed. the actual government does not care or get involved. PA's will not require a doctorate. they are not governed by the same people. they are nationally credentialed and the AMA has a say in how they work. Why would they change their requirements now? They have a less expensive education and can get the same jobs. Protest by not getting a DNP if you do not agree, its the only thing you can do at this point.
    WKShadowRN likes this.
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    Quote from angel549
    I TOTALLY agree with NPluvsalsa! GREAT IDEA!!!! I will get a DNP when they require a PA to get a doctorate also! Why the heck not? They pay PA in general more than NP anyway, and we do the same work!
    This actually isn't true. Once you control for gender differences, PA and NP pay are equivalent. In other words, a male PA and NP make the same money, same for a female PA and NP. The fact that far more women are NPs than PAs is what drives the salaries down, sadly.
    quirk, PatMac10,RN, MichiganRNk8, and 1 other like this.
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    i have also read that the averages for women are skewed due to what areas they work in compared to that of men. Many men PA's and NP's work in the higher paying specialties (cardiology, derm, ER, etc) while many women working in family practice, ob/gyn and peds can account for some of the PA/NP and male/female differences.
    MichiganRNk8 likes this.
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    I have heard that, like a previous poster said, that not many institutions and other nursing accrediting bodies are "jumping" on the DNP 2015 wagon quick enough. I've seen it stated that the time frame for this change will be "Pushed Back" to 2025 due to the unlikeliness of it happening in entirety by 2015 which a little more than 2 years away.
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    The AACN is pushing the DNP requirement. I read a paper at IOM.edu - The future of Nursing Education (2011) by Cronenwett from the University of NC Chapel Hill - copied and pasted some of itMost schools of nursing with graduate programs (approximately 475) feel
    tremendous pressure (whether or not they have the resources to mount quality
    DNP programs) to convert their master’s or post-master’s DNP programs to DNP
    programs that prepare NPs for entry into practice because of the American Association
    of Colleges of Nursing position statements on the DNP, as represented
    below:
    AACN members have endorsed the transition from specialty nursing practice
    education at the master’s level to the DNP by the target goal of 2015. AACN
    recognizes the importance of maintaining strong interest in roles (e.g., nurse
    practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nurse midwife, and nurse anesthetist) to
    meet existing health care needs. In response to practice demands and an increasingly
    complex health care system, programs designed to prepare nurses for
    advanced practice nursing will begin the transition to the practice doctorate for
    nurses who initially want to obtain the DNP, as well as for nurses with master’s
    degrees who want to return to obtain the practice doctorate. AACN will assist
    schools in their transitioning to the DNP and in their efforts to partner with other
    institutions to provide necessary graduate level course work. Specialty focused
    master’s level programs will be phased out as transition to DNP programs occurs.
    Master’s programs will continue to be offered and will prepare nurses for
    advanced generalist practice. (AACN, 2006a, p. 12)
    I have seen schools phasing out their MSN NP programs.
    However this paper also poses several problems with the this plan: need for more programs and making them affordable for nurses to attend. See page 31 of the article:

    In February 2009, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing reported
    2008−2009 survey data from 663 nursing schools (87 percent of total number of
    collegiate-level programs) showing that almost 50,000 qualified applicants to collegiate
    nursing programs were turned away (AACN, 2009a). The most frequently
    cited reason was insufficient faculty (63 percent) (AACN, 2009a).

    I have a question for a professor or policy maker. I scanned that paper and the White Paper on Advanced Practiced Registered Nurses (2011). I understand the rationale for creating a uniform scope of practice for the advanced practice nurse, but I believe there needs to be some effort to create more advanced practiced programs. When 50,000 qualified nurses are turned away, there is a problem with the system. While it is essential to define the role of the NP, it is also essential to have NPs to put in this role.

    I live in a state that has 3 programs: one of the programs is too expensive, one has already sent me a rejection letter and I am waiting on a decision from the other program.
    The reject letter said : I regret to inform me that your application for graduate at .... was not accepted by the faculty. We receive many applications.... we are not able to offer admission to all qualified applicants.
    Are more programs being created? When a program only starts once a year, and there is limited positions - what are the chances that someone is putting as much effort in this as they are at changing the requirements for becoming a NP ?


    Last edit by tony55! on Apr 21, '13 : Reason: punct
  8. 0
    I wonder if the states that have nurse practitioners practicing as autonomous primary care givers are those that are moving toward DNP. Iowa nurse practitioners do not have to have a physician coordinating or overseeing their practice.
  9. 0
    Quote from medic33
    I wonder if the states that have nurse practitioners practicing as autonomous primary care givers are those that are moving toward DNP. Iowa nurse practitioners do not have to have a physician coordinating or overseeing their practice.
    I am unaware of any states that are "moving toward DNP." This appears to be, so far, a push entirely by and within nursing academia -- the "real world" has shown little interest so far. (If I'm wrong about that, someone please correct me.)
  10. 0
    Elkpark:
    When I was asking for advice from a NP where I work whether I should go for the DNP or to a school for the Masters, she stressed DNP. My employer is already posing NP positions with a DNP degree preferred. So you are right, I don't know if states are changing, but employers may start pushing for the added degree.


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