2015 DNP - page 3

by BabyLady

I am wondering if anyone has heard any updates. Everything I keep seeing online from the AACN is "recommendation", "strongly encouraged", "highly suggested". I have yet to see anything, that says, "Look, either you... Read More


  1. 0
    I am not familiar with with the DPT issue, but was there a big backlash in the health care world when this started to become more common? Granted, the DPT is not in the same role as a DNP, but I feel as though some of the same issues could arise regaarding patients misidentifying providers.
  2. 1
    I am a FNP practicing for ~2.5yrs.
    I personally haven't met many NPs that are for the DNP. Perhaps its mainly BSN students that are being convinced to progress to this path instead of NP.
    I don't think getting a DNP is going to benefit a NP much unless you want to open your own practice or you want to teach, and primarily teach. Although they tout it as being a "clinical doctorate" its not really. NPs/RNs don't even come close to what MDs have to do in clinical hours for med school and residency.

    I personally am going to attempt to get into med school. Getting a DNP is not going to lessen the restrictions I have as a NP. And personally I don't want patients calling me a Doctor unless i'm a Medical Doctor, I would feel like a fraud.

    In my program (birthplace of the NP) they were really pushing the DNP. Mainly I think its about money, how to keep students in school longer so the schools can make more money. The classes are not really more clinical knowledge about disease, patho or management. The classes are for research, theory, policy and politics.

    I think I would gain more skills and expand my marketability and knowledge if I went and obtained additional training as NNP, Nurse Anesthetist, ACNP, etc over DNP. I don't think people are going to make more money as DNP either. Perhaps it would allow you for more management position if you wanted.

    Overall its not really worth the cost benefit ratio.
    on eagles wings likes this.
  3. 0
    emtreel,

    I agree about the DNP role not being a significant benefit clinically. I spoke to several people who completed the DNP program, all said it basically involves research rather than clinical improvement. Frankly, as it is, I feel that most if not all NP programs are lacking in the clinical exposure area. NP programs focus too much on the nonclinical subjects such as advanced nursing theories, leadership BS which IMO is a waste of time & money; exposure to these subjects ONE TIME in undergrad is sufficient. I would have preferred additional classes in pathology, pharmacology, working with cadavers or more clinical hours. This is where MD & PA outshine the NP routes.

    While eventually, after 3 -5 yrs of practicing under your belt, some NP may feel they are comparable to a primary MD (some probably are, but for myself, I won't pretend my NP education is equal to that of an MD).... So, for me, I won't waste my time racking up students getting a DNP just to be called Dr.

    If I'm going to spend another 2 yrs in school to become a doctor, I might as well apply to an out of country NP to MD programs. I would rather be called an MD than a DNP...

    Having said that, those that want to pursue the DNP route, kudos to you for having the discipline to tolerate more nursing school. Just not for me.

    Note: I may eat my words down the road since I'm just a new FNP graduate, but I don't think so.
    Last edit by middleageNP on Feb 17, '11
  4. 0
    Quote from linearthinker
    Can you name the colleges that have no plans for a DNP?

    Actually some of the top ranked schools are not yet on board. Off the top of my head:
    UPenn
    UNC
    Yale
    UCSF
    UCSF has a DNP:

    http://nurseweb.ucsf.edu/www/ps-dc.htm
  5. 0
    Quote from star77
    That link is a PhD program, not a DNP.
  6. 0
    Ah yes, sorry. I stand corrected.
  7. 0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Remember 30 years ago when "you have to have your BSN in order to be an RN?"

    Well, I think this will be the same way - not worried in the least and think the lack of consistency with the DNP is going to be their downfall.

    I remember a time where they actually were going to make the standard for NP education a Masters Degree and we all know how that fizzled out.
  8. 3
    Quote from emtneel
    I am a FNP practicing for ~2.5yrs.
    I personally haven't met many NPs that are for the DNP. Perhaps its mainly BSN students that are being convinced to progress to this path instead of NP.
    I don't think getting a DNP is going to benefit a NP much unless you want to open your own practice or you want to teach, and primarily teach. Although they tout it as being a "clinical doctorate" its not really. NPs/RNs don't even come close to what MDs have to do in clinical hours for med school and residency.

    I personally am going to attempt to get into med school. Getting a DNP is not going to lessen the restrictions I have as a NP. And personally I don't want patients calling me a Doctor unless i'm a Medical Doctor, I would feel like a fraud.

    In my program (birthplace of the NP) they were really pushing the DNP. Mainly I think its about money, how to keep students in school longer so the schools can make more money. The classes are not really more clinical knowledge about disease, patho or management. The classes are for research, theory, policy and politics.

    I think I would gain more skills and expand my marketability and knowledge if I went and obtained additional training as NNP, Nurse Anesthetist, ACNP, etc over DNP. I don't think people are going to make more money as DNP either. Perhaps it would allow you for more management position if you wanted.

    Overall its not really worth the cost benefit ratio.

    Having a DNP does little, if anything, to aid in opening a practice. One thing (academic title) has nothing to do with the other thing (role and scope of practice). Regarding teaching, the DNP is not the appropriate terminal degree as the DNP is not research based--it is a practice-based degree.

    As far as "NPs/RNs don't even come close to what MDs have to do in clinical hours for med school and residency"you are absolutely correct. The third year medical student who is addressed as doctor has no where close to the 14 years of health care experience as the average NP had in my cohort, nor the average 20 years of health care experience, training and education as within my DNP cohort.

    In abandoning the profession of nursing for medical school, I think you are wise to consider as this path seems to be a much better fit for you. This way, you will never have to consider yourself a "fraud" by holding an earned doctoral degree within nursing.
    Guttercat, Nccity2002, and jcgrund like this.
  9. 5
    Quote from Dr. Tammy, FNP/GNP-C
    As far as "NPs/RNs don't even come close to what MDs have to do in clinical hours for med school and residency"you are absolutely correct. The third year medical student who is addressed as doctor has no where close to the 14 years of health care experience as the average NP had in my cohort, nor the average 20 years of health care experience, training and education as within my DNP cohort.
    I've never worked in any clinical situation where MS-3s are addressed as "doctor" except by mistake, the same as lots of clients assume a male RN is a "doctor" -- MS-3s have not completed their doctoral degree and are not licensed physicians.

    As for the extensive experience of your grad school cohort, that's all fine and good -- but we all know there are a kazillion direct-entry programs across the US cranking out advanced practice nurses with no nursing experience at all, and, if there aren't already direct-entry DNP programs out there, there will be any day now (so, there will be plenty of schools cranking out DNPs with no nursing experience at all). It's just not reasonable, IMO, to make the "but advanced practice nurses have all those years of nursing experience" argument when there are so many people entering advanced practice via the direct-entry route.

    I am another advanced practice nurse who, so far, sees no value or advantage to the DNP boondoggle except to stroke some individuals' egos (oh, yeah, and to make more $$$$ for schools ).
  10. 0
    To me, it is very important that states and the national organizations that certifies advance practice nurses, gets more specific about what is going to happen. Those of us that are in school right now, are at a major disadvantage because we do not know what route to take.

    About 1/2 of the DNP programs I have found only accept students that have an MSN and advanced practice credentials. The other 1/2 are BSN-DNP programs.

    I actually sent an e-mail yesterday to the AACN asking for clarification on this very issue.

    So far, I have not got a response...to me, that is very telling on how "cut" it is not.

    My guess? Is that it may get pushed out maybe 5 more years...I could be wrong...but the colleges are moving very, very slow which is evidence that they are not on board with the plan as of yet.


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