2015 DNP - page 17

I am wondering if anyone has heard any updates. Everything I keep seeing online from the AACN is "recommendation", "strongly encouraged", "highly suggested". I have yet to see anything, that says, "Look, either you... Read More

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    "Fluff" and "DNP koolaid" = belittling. And I think you well know that. Most (all?) of your posts on this subject are incendiary. You are consistently disrespectful and it isn't an accident.
    Last edit by linearthinker on Sep 11, '11
    Nurse2long likes this.

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  2. 1
    Quote from linearthinker
    "Fluff" and "DNP koolaid" = belittling. And I think you well know that. Most (all?) of your posts on this subject are incendiary. You are consistently disrespectful and it isn't an accident.
    Belittling or truthful?

    Quite frankly, anyone who pushes the DNP as much as you do without realizing its massive flaws has ulterior motives or a conflict of interest. So which is it?
    Szasz_is_Right likes this.
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    I don't agree that my program has "massive flaws." I am aware that there are some that are sub par. The comments are not about sub par programs, they are about the DNP in general.

    I'm not "pushing it" now, nor have I ever. I have consistently said it is not for everyone and should not be required for entry to practice.

    I do think we all should support colleagues who are furthering their education, as well as the profession. Doing so does not involve drinking any kool-aid. It only requires a bit of grace, and respect.

    In my experience, it has been possible to discuss the pros and cons of pursuing a BSN, MSN, PhD or DNP without even inadvertently insulting people to whom those things have great value. That some people continually make comments fully intended to deride the DNP, rather than discuss, is a psychological phenomena which mystifies me.
    kdrose01 likes this.
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    We promote the idea of lively debate. This means you are free to disagree with anyone on any type of subject matter as long as your criticism is constructive and polite. Tossing around politically charged buzz words serves no useful purpose, Nursing needs well thoughout dialogue on the DNP as we reach this crucial junction in growth of the nursing profession.
    sirI and traumaRUs like this.
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    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Sep 12, '11
    sirI and traumaRUs like this.
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    caroline,

    what program are you attending if you don't mind me asking? I'm interested in getting my DNP!

    Thank you in advance!
  7. 0
    Here is a nurse-practitioner-written article that describes the 2015 DNP requirement:

    http://nurse-practitioners-and-physi...spx?CTIID=3884
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    Although the above-referenced article is well written - one must realize that the DNP is a THOUGHT, SUGGESTION, but not at all MANDATORY!

    I stand behind my statement that 30 years ago, the BSN was going to be the entry level to RN practice.

    The DNP is going to fall by the wayside too.
    JennyNurse2B likes this.
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    And personally I don't want patients calling me a Doctor unless i'm a Medical Doctor, I would feel like a fraud.
    I think that's really sad, since the debate about the title "doctor" extends far beyond the medical profession. Many physicians want that title designated only for them and not for scholars who have PhDs, though the title historically has stemmed from those who perform scholarly research and not those studying medicine. It's a name to be shared by those who have earned the title through academia and not to be reserved for those of a particular profession.

    All of my family and friends who've toiled away in academia for years (including my mother who holds a PhD in nursing) worked incredibly hard for their degrees, so it's not a fraud to refer to any of them as "doctor" simply because one particular profession has commandeered the title. If you do earn your DNP, proudly own your title. My mom's brother, a physician, proudly refers to her as Dr.

    By the way, after my mom earned her PhD, she said the physicians with whom she worked treated her with more respect. There's certainly something to be said for promoting education among nurses.
  10. 0
    In my experience, it has been possible to discuss the pros and cons of pursuing a BSN, MSN, PhD or DNP without even inadvertently insulting people to whom those things have great value. That some people continually make comments fully intended to deride the DNP, rather than discuss, is a psychological phenomena which mystifies me.
    I'm currently in an ABSN program after spending years climbing the corporate ladder. During my time in corporate America, I've never heard of anyone being accused of "drinking the Kool-Aid" because they wanted to pursue more education for personal or professional reasons. I can't wrap my head around why nurses attack one another over attaining a higher education - isn't that something that is valued in America? Very sad, indeed. Opinions are certainly valuable, but the unprofessional and disrespectful attacks over a difference of opinion are a detriment to nurses and the profession as a whole.

    A few weeks ago, I witnessed foul-mouthed nurses throwing each other into lockers in the break room as a game on my clinical floor. That kind of behavior would never be acceptable in the corporate world, and it hurts the image of nursing. Several of my classmates and I questioned if we wanted to be nurses after witnessing that kind of hooliganism in the work place because we didn't leave our cushy jobs for that nonsense. It was not the only time I've witnessed a complete lack of professionalism among nurses, which is part of the reason I think so many of my highly educated classmates will unfortunately move on from hospital nursing (where we need really good nurses). That being said, I've also seen some fantastic and professional nurses on the clinical floor, who have set really great examples - they're also the ones who are anxious to move on, though. However, in order to improve the image of nursing and job satisfaction, the lack of professionalism and disrespect amongst one another will have to stop. Otherwise, nursing will lose some really nurses as they revert to corporate America or all move onto NP/DNP positions.


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