2015 DNP - page 16

by BabyLady

73,407 Unique Views | 235 Comments

I am wondering if anyone has heard any updates. Everything I keep seeing online from the AACN is "recommendation", "strongly encouraged", "highly suggested". I have yet to see anything, that says, "Look, either you... Read More


  1. 2
    Carla,
    Your program sounds great. I don't want to give the impression that I'm against research and all "fluff" classes, just why repeat and advance them in a DNP when that is not what is needed. I've gotten great benefit from my BSN research and stats courses in being able to differentiate between a good study and a bad one, so they do have merit. The vast inconsistency in DNP curriculums and the fact that most are laden(?) with research and academic courses reflects the fact that "nursing leadership" itself is full of academics. The ANA and other powers that be should have consulted with the laymen (and even physicians) to see what was really needed. If they promote their kind and increase their numbers it gives validity to their point of view.
    CCRNDiva and oldiebutgoodie like this.
  2. 0
    Carla, I agree your program sounds great! Would you mind sharing where you completed your program?
  3. 0
    Hi:

    I attended Drexel University in PA. I am hearing that it is now very competitive to get into.........they are receiving over 400 applicants per each new class that starts.............and the curriculum is only offered at certain times throughout the year.....So once a year the 1st clinical rotation begins and you are unable to start again until the following year.
    Carla
    Carla
  4. 1
    Quote from oldiebutgoodie
    I already took statistics and research as part of my MSN. I guess I don't understand why one would need MORE of it in a DNP. Advanced stats and research would more appropriately belong in a PhD program. The other stuff belongs in an MPH program.

    My ideal DNP program would have separate courses (with their associated pharmacology) in:

    1. Cardiology (with teaching how to read a 12 lead)
    2. Radiology (extensive teaching on reading xrays and CTs/MRIs)
    3. Pulmonology
    4. Renal
    5. Surgery (optional--pick one: general, ortho, etc)
    6. Elective (OB-GYn, peds, pain, primary care, etc.)

    Just my $.02 worth. I'm sure the AACN will be contacting me soon to ask me to elaborate on these great ideas.

    Oldiebutgoodie

    PS--Anybody else have great ideas for their ideal DNP program??
    This sounds great, but I'm wondering.... who would we get to TEACH these classes? There is already a real shortage of nursing instructors (unlike the imaginary shortage of RNs), and finding instructors with the advanced knowledge to teach these courses would be even more difficult. The next logical solution would be having MDs teach in the DNP programs, but I don't even want to begin to think about the political implications there...
    CCRNDiva likes this.
  5. 0
    After reading through many of these discussions, I am surprised at how many are so dead set against the DNP! I am currently studying for my DNP. I searched for a program that would meet my expectations, i.e. clinically based and backed with evidence obtained through research. My program has set residencies that you can choose from. I have learned more in this program than ever.
    If a program offers too much "fluff", then by all means don't attend that program. However, anyone who advances their clinical expertise as well as their education is going to have an improved knowledge base and therefore, more information to draw upon when treating patients. MSN prepared NPs will still provide excellent care, but they will have to draw much more upon their own resources.
    The other plus of DNP, is hopefully NPs will get full reimbursement as I think this is the bigger push behind the DNP. Why should a physician get paid more for suturing a laceration than an NP? Does the MD do better stitches? No. He/she simply has the MD initials. I work in a rural ED where there are no doctors. Because we are also a hand surgery center, many physicians send patients to me because they are not comfortable with hands. Yet I get less reimbursement because I am an NP. Sigh.
    Sorry for the long post. I think NPs deserve respect and recognition for all they do.
  6. 2
    Quote from Caroline32669
    After reading through many of these discussions, I am surprised at how many are so dead set against the DNP! I am currently studying for my DNP. I searched for a program that would meet my expectations, i.e. clinically based and backed with evidence obtained through research. My program has set residencies that you can choose from. I have learned more in this program than ever.
    If a program offers too much "fluff", then by all means don't attend that program. However, anyone who advances their clinical expertise as well as their education is going to have an improved knowledge base and therefore, more information to draw upon when treating patients. MSN prepared NPs will still provide excellent care, but they will have to draw much more upon their own resources.
    The other plus of DNP, is hopefully NPs will get full reimbursement as I think this is the bigger push behind the DNP. Why should a physician get paid more for suturing a laceration than an NP? Does the MD do better stitches? No. He/she simply has the MD initials. I work in a rural ED where there are no doctors. Because we are also a hand surgery center, many physicians send patients to me because they are not comfortable with hands. Yet I get less reimbursement because I am an NP. Sigh.
    Sorry for the long post. I think NPs deserve respect and recognition for all they do.
    I agree with much of what you have said, but just don't know that the DNP in its present incarnation is the best way to accomplish this. I am sure the degree provides benefits (like all advanced degrees), but is it what Advanced Practice needs right now? I would love to see the DNP follow some of the ideas in this thread, but that doesn't mean I'm a "hater". I believe it has value but do not believe it to be equal to an MD.
    eagle78 and elkpark like this.
  7. 2
    Eileen T. O'Grady

    The “Anti-DNP”

    And, there is a message for those who disagree with the DNP. You should not pursue this degree if you are deeply satisfied in your current positions and are meeting patient needs. Earning a DNP requires a spirit dedicated to learning and an acknowledgement that something is pulling you ever deeper into nursing. A strong DNP program will kindle that bright spark, change you, and create tension between what is and what could be. It is not always a comfortable feeling since DNP students realize they have outgrown their flowerpot and must be repotted. If the program is well run, has a high degree of academic rigor, and fosters timely program completion, graduates will be positioned to meaningfully influence health reform and work towards building more humane, lower-cost delivery systems. This dedication and hard work may not be for everyone.



    http://www.webnponline.com/columns/d...opeful-future/
    Nurse2long and prairienp like this.
  8. 2
    Quote from linearthinker
    Eileen T. O'Grady

    The “Anti-DNP”

    And, there is a message for those who disagree with the DNP. You should not pursue this degree if you are deeply satisfied in your current positions and are meeting patient needs. Earning a DNP requires a spirit dedicated to learning and an acknowledgement that something is pulling you ever deeper into nursing. A strong DNP program will kindle that bright spark, change you, and create tension between what is and what could be. It is not always a comfortable feeling since DNP students realize they have outgrown their flowerpot and must be repotted. If the program is well run, has a high degree of academic rigor, and fosters timely program completion, graduates will be positioned to meaningfully influence health reform and work towards building more humane, lower-cost delivery systems. This dedication and hard work may not be for everyone.



    http://www.webnponline.com/columns/d...opeful-future/
    The fluff may not be for everyone.
    Szasz_is_Right and PMFB-RN like this.
  9. 0
    Belittling others' goals and efforts lacks collegiality and professionalism. Shame on you.
  10. 1
    It's not a belittling of anyone's goals. Those who want the DNP are free to pursue it, but not everyone feels that the DNP is the degree that it should be. Again, the benefits that are ascribed to the DNP can be yours no matter what doctorate you pursue. I do not believe that the DNP will suddenly make all NP's equal to MD's. That is not a put down of NP's or a raising-up of MD's, it's simple math. By the same token, you should not belittle and look down on those who don't drink the DNP Koolaid.
    elkpark likes this.


Top