Will you work during a Pandemic? - page 44

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  1. by   Kabin
    Unless already laid off, we're all working during this global pandemic.
  2. by   indigo girl
    Quote from Kabin
    Unless already laid off, we're all working during this global pandemic.
    Exactly, we are already working.

    Those of us who have not been asleep at the wheel have had some time to get used to some of the new normals of this pandemic.

    Those new normals?

    Influenza in hot weather! Who would have thought to see people dying of flu in June?

    Lots of young people getting sick, but the seniors not so much. Flu hitting summer camps and cruise ships! Rows of patients on vents in community hospitals in northern Canada. Families in shock, grieving the loss of their previously healthy young people before us in the news in Milwaukee, Chicago, NYC, Salt Lake City, Miami, El Paso, San Diego...

    We have learned much about the types of conditions that make us more vulnerable to a a bad outcome. And, that they were a lot more common than we would have thought. Surprisingly including more conditions than we would have thought. For example, there are many of us with mild asthma that do not take medication routinely, and would consider ourselves relatively healthy. But, we now know that having any kind of reactive airway disease is a hugh risk factor. Know anyone with sleep apnea or anyone who is 20 to 30 pounds overweight? Diabetics, likewise.

    We have learned that a negative rapid flu test does not mean that the person you are seeing in the ER with c/o flu symptoms is not actually going to die of flu. Most won't, but some will. Some are only going to be diagnosed later when they are critical or at autopsy.

    We know that we have no vaccine yet, and that supplies of just about everything that we will need in a surge are going to be limited.

    It's been an education. This flu snuck up on us when we were already busy at work.

    This is only the first wave.
  3. by   Goju
    Hi all,

    Havent checked in here for a while. My original post was for H5N1 but i am fascinated by the challenge H1N1 posses. While not as deadly as a potential H5N1 Pandemic, H1N1 is still pretty bad. People getting very sick and many dying. A real Pandemic virus. I do believe that health care facilities will run out of PPE soon. Certainly when a surge hits. Enough of those and no supplies will be left leaving you all totally exposed. I fear for your and your family's health and lives come this Fall.

    Quote from Laidback Al
    When Goju first posed his question in 2007 the mostly likely influenza virus to cause a pandemic was H5N1. His hypothetical question really had two questions rolled into one. Will you work during a pandemic and will you worked during a pandemic with a high CFR? We are now in a pandemic. So the question still remains, will you work during a pandemic?

    The CFR for confirmed H5N1 cases is currently around 60% and for a hypothetical H5N1 pandemic it could still be that high. The CFR for the current H1N1 pandemic is unknown because of the opacity in the reporting of health officials, but seems to be under .01% right now. That could change for the next wave which is expected in the northern hemisphere in a few months.

    Goju hasn't checked in for a while, but I imagine he is interested in your response to working during the current, apparently low CFR H1N1 pandemic and if you will work in a high CFR H1N1 pandemic if this virus changes or recombines in the next several months.

    When Goju first posted his question, it was a mental exercise for members of allnurse.com. Now, today, Since June 11, 2009, when WHO declared the first pandemic of the 21st century, it becomes a much more relevant question for each and everyone of us: Will you work during a pandemic or not?
  4. by   Woodenpug
    Yup, the sky is falling. No ppe. OMG, will you help me foxy loxy? serious, how many threads do we need before someone decides that ..... wow, we are actually addressing the situation adequately. So solly, tough to get people to overact. Let's just try harder.
  5. by   Laidback Al
    Quote from Woodenpug
    Yup, the sky is falling. No ppe. OMG, will you help me foxy loxy? serious, how many threads do we need before someone decides that ..... wow, we are actually addressing the situation adequately. So solly, tough to get people to overact. Let's just try harder.
    I am sorry, Woodenpug, your sarcasm is so thick that I don't understand your post. What is your point?
  6. by   DeepFriedRN
    Quote from Woodenpug
    Yup, the sky is falling. No ppe. OMG, will you help me foxy loxy? serious, how many threads do we need before someone decides that ..... wow, we are actually addressing the situation adequately. So solly, tough to get people to overact. Let's just try harder.
    You are free to start your own thread in this forum stating your opinion at any time. If the threads about pandemic flu concerns bother you so much, stop reading them. Entering them to post rude comments is unnecessary.
  7. by   misswoosie
    Don't feel adequately rewarded, appreciated or looked after now, so why would it be any different in this scenario?
    Nurses will be the last people on the govs agenda.They will be too busy making sure the government ministers, members of parliament and royal family (you get the idea-the important people) are protected and cared for.
  8. by   indigo girl
    Of course, most of us are already working, but reading about PPE problems this early into the pandemic is worrisome.

    http://www.calnurses.org/media-cente...-patients.html

    This should not be happening anywhere near this soon if that facility had done what they were supposed to have done. States were warned over 3 years ago to implement workable pandemic plans.

    Someone said something about a national stockpile that includes N95 masks to be drawn upon if needed. I do not know if this is so, but I do know that no one should expect staff to put themselves at risk. How many HCW have pre-existing health problems or habits that would put them at risk for complications if they were infected? Are any of us overweight, diabetic, smokers, asthmatics or pregnant?

    (hat tip to Herring and Fla Medic for the heads up on the PPE articles)
    Last edit by indigo girl on Jul 15, '09
  9. by   Girl Scout
    Wow. Just read that article. I'm shocked! Well, actually, I'm not. :uhoh21: It's not surprising to me that nurses are treated how they're treated. Sad and infuriating, yes. Surprising, no. Heck, CNAs and PCAs, too, we get trampled by administrators. Oh, I could rant and rant but I'll save it for a day when I'm more sane.

    There is only so much you can do without protective equipment. After that, it's a gamble on your health, or your life, and your health could end up being your life. I guess if all nurses threw caution to the wind and went into this pandemic without PPE, we would be further up the creek. It makes about as much sense as just randomly deciding we don't need to take precautions anymore with TB patients. I mean... c'mon!
  10. by   indigo girl
    Does your workplace really care about your safety?

    State Reviews Nurse Swine Flu Threat

    http://www.mercurynews.com/breakingnews/ci_12836945

    Moral of story, make sure you get tested if you get sick at work, and have it documented that in your clinicians's judgement, you are diagnosed as a probable case of swine flu. Remember the rapid test has frequent false negatives. If a clinician decided to put them on Tamiflu because of the s/s, then that should be good enough proof, imo.

    I wonder if the nurses are protected as whistle blowers.

    Quote from www.mercurynews.com

    The complaint was filed with the state Division of Occupational Safety and Health. By law, the state investigation must be completed within six months.

    Since exposure was likely, the nurses were presumed to have swine flu and were being treated for it while staying at home to recuperate, California Nurses Association President Deborah Burger said.

    Sutter Solano's Chief Nursing Executive Kim Trumbull said only one employee tested positive for swine flu and others were only known to have respiratory illness.

    "If we had 10 confirmed cases then we would probably be taking it a little more seriously," Trumbull said.
    The complaint claimed the hospital failed to provide nurses with individually fitted, duck bill-shaped masks used while treating patients who have an airborne illness.

    It said the nurses had been provided with a brand of mask they hadn't been fitted for.

    Trumbull said the hospital has more than 400 masks and provided nurses with fittings to ensure proper use.
    (hat tip PFI/monotreme)
    Last edit by indigo girl on Jul 16, '09
  11. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from misswoosie
    Don't feel adequately rewarded, appreciated or looked after now, so why would it be any different in this scenario?
    Nurses will be the last people on the govs agenda.They will be too busy making sure the government ministers, members of parliament and royal family (you get the idea-the important people) are protected and cared for.
    I'm sorry that you feel that way. :uhoh21:
  12. by   indigo girl
    I am still marveling that we are seeing cases in July where I live. It's sweltering here, yet my hospital has had 3 swine flu related deaths this summer which the hospital has been careful not to relay to staff in their Swine Flu "updates".

    Just last night I found out that we had the entire staff of one floor started on Tamiflu after one nurse there was infected on the job (also not in the flu updates to staff). Yet, a technician assigned to the infected patient on that same unit as a float was not offered Tamiflu because she was just floated to the unit. She got sick as did her husband and 3 children. They all had GI s/s which is a known presentation of this virus. This does not bode well for the fall.

    One of the techs on my own unit is an expectant father. His wife is an RN at our hospital. She was assigned to take care of a suspected swine flu case last week. No one informed her that the CDC recommendations are that pregnant staff be reassigned, and if that is not possible then they should not be present for certain procedures such as nebulizer treatments, CPAP/BiPAP etc. There has been no information at all that would indicate that our hospital is aware of increased risks to pregnant staff. Surely they must be. But, not to tell the staff?

    I have no faith that they are going to offer Tamiflu to anyone that should test negative via the unreliable rapid flu test if that is the criteria that they will use which would not surprise me. It's not so much of an issue if I am infected except that I won't be able to work, and each day off counts as a separate call out. It's not so much of an issue if I only have a mild case, but I do have asthma, and maybe it would be smart to take Tamiflu if I knew that I was exposed and felt sick even if my test came back negative. By now there are many cases of people who have died whose initials tests were negative but were found at autopsy to be positive. Most of the fatal cases in NYC were asthmatics.

    Don't mind me. I'm just having my own little reaction to how my workplace is handling things. I have to say that I feel like a mushroom working there, and I don't like it...
  13. by   GooeyRN
    THAT sucks.

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