Will you work during a Pandemic? - page 4

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  1. by   Goju
    If you do not go "into" work, will you assist neighbors asking for help to care for their sick family members? Would you volunteer to help in your community?
  2. by   EmmaG
    Quote from Goju
    If you do not go "into" work, will you assist neighbors asking for help to care for their sick family members? Would you volunteer to help in your community?
    With protective equipment, yes.
  3. by   Goju
    Ms. Patton, President of the American Nurses Association participated in an online blog for HHS about Pandemic Flu. here
    http://blog.pandemicflu.gov/

    It is a fascinating read. I implore all here to write to her and ask her help in securing Proper PPE and guidelines for nurses dealing with Pandemic Flu.

    Rebecca M. Patton, MSN, RN, CNOR

    Rebecca M. Patton MSN, RN, CNOR, of Lakewood, Ohio was elected to serve a two-year term as president of the American Nurses Association in June 2006. ANA is the nation's largest professional nursing organization representing the major health policy, practice, and workplace issues of 2.9 million registered nurses (RNs) in the United States. A nurse since 1980, Patton was most recently the Director of periOperative Services for EMH Regional Healthcare System in Cleveland, Ohio. She is also a member of the Editorial Board of OJIN: Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, and has written chapters for books on medical-surgical nursing and articles for nursing journals. Patton has a Bachelors of Science in nursing from Kent State University and a Masters of Nursing from Case Western Reserve University. She has held numerous ANA positions including treasurer (1998-2002), Board of Directors member (1994-1998), and delegate to the ANA House of Delegates (2003-2005).
  4. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Goju
    If you do not go "into" work, will you assist neighbors asking for help to care for their sick family members? Would you volunteer to help in your community?
    First, if there isn't enough PPE to go around for medical personnel working in hospitals in such a situation, where are these community volunteers going to get it? Second, without medical supplies such as suction, IV supplies, antivirals, ventilators, oxygen, etc, what would volunteer nurses be able to do for these people that their family members could not?
  5. by   deleern
    we live in a very rural area. I would work as my children are out of the nest. I would insist that my daughter not work and keep herself quarentined. (she is a nurse as well) she needs to be safe for her young family. But my Husband and I have already discused this... And we have always kept a large stock of food. we grew up during the "nucular attack scare era"
  6. by   Goju
    what it would take to make you willing to work under circumstances such as I have described.

    What would you want?

    PPE -- OK, which ones? N95s enough or would you want a higher grade perhaps even 1/2 masks with P-100 filters, goggles? or would you request full face? Would you supply your own?

    Would you expect Tamiflu, for you families? vaccine priority? Would you spend your own money on it?

    would you work if you received extra (hazard) pay?

    would you work if you were supplied a hotel room paid for so you don't have to go home and possible expose your family?

    Would it be easier for you to do all that if you knew that ALL hospital executives were living on site and working?
  7. by   ElvishDNP
    There is no amount of money that would make me want to go in to work. Money is not my priority. My family is.

    If my family gets sick, I want to be the one taking care of them. If they die, I want to be there when it happens. If I get sick, I will probably quarantine myself.
  8. by   alkaleidi
    Quote from Perpetual Student
    Running out of food is NOT a concern for me. I just rec'd another year's worth today, as a matter of fact. My UPS driver didn't even seem too annoyed to be hauling in an 800 lb shipment. I've taken care to prepare myself sufficiently for just about any eventuality (from Alien invasion to Zombie apocalypse, lol) and have encouraged others to do the same.
    OK, can I ask some personal questions? What does 800lb of food look like? I mean, HOW much food makes 800lb? Next, what on earth do you DO with 800lb of food??? Where do you store it? How?

    I'm baffled and intrigued! Tell me more! LOL.
  9. by   Laidback Al
    Quote from RN4NICU
    . . . Second, without medical supplies such as suction, IV supplies, antivirals, ventilators, oxygen, etc, what would volunteer nurses be able to do for these people that their family members could not?
    Don't underestimate your skills and knowledge. I know nothing of nursing and taking care of sick people. Most people are like me and would not have any idea about home care or nursing.

    What volunteer nurses can and should do in the event of a pandemic is be prepared to instruct family, friends, and neighbors (from a distance or with your own PPE) in basic nursing tasks that could be done in the home. If a pandemic is as bad as Goju, myself, and others expect, the medical industry will be set back a hundred years. The home care practices of the 1918 pandemic will again become the modus operandi.
  10. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Laidback Al
    Don't underestimate your skills and knowledge. I know nothing of nursing and taking care of sick people. Most people are like me and would not have any idea about home care or nursing.

    What volunteer nurses can and should do in the event of a pandemic is be prepared to instruct family, friends, and neighbors (from a distance or with your own PPE) in basic nursing tasks that could be done in the home. If a pandemic is as bad as Goju, myself, and others expect, the medical industry will be set back a hundred years. The home care practices of the 1918 pandemic will again become the modus operandi.
    Exactly.

    I don't underestimate my skills or knowledge. However, care in the community is pretty much going to be comfort measures only - family members are perfectly capable of providing this. There is nothing a nurse can do that a family member cannot do to provide comfort measures in the absence of medical supplies. What basic nursing tasks do you think people will be unable to figure out for themselves?
  11. by   Ayrman
    Some very good points have been raised during the course of this thread. Thank you to those who have raised their hands with questions; it is how we all learn.

    Someone asked what 800 lbs of food looks like and where would you store it? Using canned goods by way of example it would fill a normal size clothes closet with stacks of cases of canned goods ranging from meat products to vegetables to fruits (which BTW, aside from tomato products have the shortest shelf life). 800 lbs of whole grains, which some people store with an eye towards cost-effective calorie counts, would likewise fit into a similar area in sacks of 50, 80 or 100 lbs depending upon what you store.

    My lovely bride and myself have both over the years of our lives faced shortages of food, funds and more. As a result we have become ardent preppers if you will, laying back during good times for the lean periods. Food of course, during which course we have found that canned goods stored inside the home (not the garage or storage unit) will last 10 years except as noted above (peaches in particular, as well as some tomato products, will leak out of the cans after as little as 2 years). Toilet paper too, as we both remember the acute shortage of the mid-70's when a night show comedian joked about such, thereby creating an actual shortage as product flew off the shelves, lasting 2-3 months (how many of you have to buy TP every 2 weeks or face doing without?).

    Both of us are beyond the "endangered" ages for H5N1 - at lower risk merely due to age but as she is a teacher (also trained as a Wilderness First Responder with IV, suture, injection and other skills) and I'm an RN we both are involved in high-risk employment when it comes to OTJ exposure - so we have built up medical stores that will allow us to care for each other if it comes to it (assuming the other is well), or those whose care may be entrusted to us such as family or friends, assuming their condition is such that they would not be hospitalized. In fact, I dare say my personal stash of PPE would outlast my floor's (Med-Surg) if resupply were an issue. With attention to waste I could provide care to 2-3 people for 2 weeks if it came to it before running out of gowns and masks any way. I have well more than just PPE - until a couple years ago I ran a small medical supply business out of my home as a sideline and set back a certain portion of my stock for personal use so I'm well set with IV and injection supplies, non-electric suction, soft goods, patient care items and even a portable ventilator.

    If push comes to shove and the pandemic hits hard we can retreat to a location of safety where we'll be implimenting protective quarantine and we'll have a small group of medical people in caring for any that become infected amongst the dozens that encompass our collective families.

    The answer to the question "Will I work" is yes, to a point. Once it becomes clear that safety is a serious issue then we will retreat and I'll be working for beans and billet (something you sleep on, not what you shoot) for a few months. I do know that my current employer has done nothing more than talk about the possibility of pandemic and has no plans to address the issue of same save that they'll cross that bridge when they come to it.

    I understand calculated risk, having worked EMS for 24 years before the career change a few back. That's why I say I'll work while I can but once the risk becomes too great (no PPE, patient loads beyond dangerous, onerous schedules, etc) I'll fall back. Even firefighters don't run into a burning building without certain safety parameters and factors in place.

    Ayrman
  12. by   indigo girl
    Quote from RN4NICU

    ...care in the community is pretty much going to be comfort measures only - family members are perfectly capable of providing this. There is nothing a nurse can do that a family member cannot do to provide comfort measures in the absence of medical supplies. What basic nursing tasks do you think people will be unable to figure out for themselves?
    Yes, you are correct in that most people will be cared for at home by family
    or friends. That is the CDC and HHS strategy. For some, it will be comfort care only,
    but others might have more of a chance of survival with a little extra
    care, and knowledge of how to provide hydration without IV fluids.

    We live in a culture where when people get sick, they depend on the medical
    system to not only tell them what to do, but to do it for them. Most are totally dependent
    on that system. Now, it is not going to be available. People are going to panic when their loved ones
    start to become very ill, and the hospital is not
    an option. Someone has to give them some basic information. To us it is basic, but it is not for them.
    We can not assume that they will know what to do. I can
    only imagine how terrifying this is going to be for some parents.

    I feel certain that govt and health departments will be forced to provide
    this kind of information. We also have other resources that could be
    distributed prior to this event such as this link:

    http://www.flutrackers.com/forum/sho...19&postcount=1

    And, there are other concerns as well, such as what happens when the caregivers in the home get sick?
    What about those people that live alone? What about the children that may be left without parents?
    There is planning that does address these particular issues, plans that utilize schools, armories, etc.
    Many plans rely heavily on volunteers to help provide this basic care for large numbers of victims
    in designated non-hospital casualty areas.
  13. by   Goju
    indigo girl,

    That is an excellent link. This has been an eye opening thread to say the least.

    Nurses will be the front line and by the sound of it... the lines will be very porous.

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